Skip to main content

Full text of "A History of the Church of the Brethren in southern district of Pennsylvania"

See other formats







A HISTORY 



>f 



THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 



in 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA 



by 



THE HISTORICAL COMMITTEE 



Edited by 



J. LINWOOD EISENBERG, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 

Pastor of the Church of the Brethren 
Shippensburg, Pa. 



Quincy Orphanage Press 
Quincy, Pa. 









The ownership of this history is vested in 
the Church of the Brethren of the Southern 
District of Pennsylvania through its Historical 
Committee, G. W. Harlacher, Chairman; 
Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary; A. S. Baugher, 
Treasurer; Mrs. Annie Sheets and M. E. 
Sollenberger. 







o 




o 


o 


00 


- 


r-i 


be 




a> 


Z 


*H 


HH 


o 




«H 


H 




to 


G 


P 


•i-^ 


o 


GO 


ffi 


• i-i 




(V 




3 

o 


H 


rS 




bfi 


a 


• l-H 


* 


(1) 


£ 


a 


o 






n 

c 

• rH 


s 


00 


05 


F-4 


a 


O 


O 


<D 




^ 




H 




o 

H 

02 

— 

X 



5h 

bG 
PQ 



CO 



o 



o 



o 

JS-4 

C 

o 
o 

<D 
CQ 

• - 

M 

+-> 
<D 
<D 

H CO 

F 

DQ 

5 s 



- 
OS 

0> 
CO 



bx> 



•i— i 

P* 
CO 



id 



^h bJDi 
o d 



• i-H 



Dedicated 

I to 

Our Forefathers 

who 

served so faithfully to preserve and promote 

the 

Teachings of Christ 

as interpreted by 

The Church of the Brethren 

in 
The District of Southern Pennsylvania, 






FOREWORD 



Christian Greetings to the Churches of the Southern Dis- 
trict of Pennsylvania, Church of the Brethren : 

You are to be commended for having taken the important 
step of putting a part of your history into a permanent record. 
I have watched with much 
interest for several years the 
progress of the work on that 
assignment. You are to be 
congratulated that you have 
in your midst folks inter- 
ested and faithful from 
whom to form a Committee 
with a sense of historical 
values, and able to meet dis- 
couragements, and to keep 
on going, when the going 
was hard ; and also, I con- 
gratulate you on having in 
your own ministry a man so 
well qualified by educational 
preparation and experience, 
in the person of Dr. J. 
Linwood Eisenberg, as your 
Editor of this splendid his- 
torical program. I am highly 
gratified with what you have 
accomplished in your Dis- 
trict, and mine, and for your 
ancestors and mine, natu- 
rally and spiritually to the third and fourth generations. You 
will understand more fully the responsibility of your in- 
heritance, and it will qualify you the better to serve your day 
and generation, and qualify them for their day to come. 

The Lord bless you, and make you a blessing. 
Sincerely and fraternally, 

GEORGE NESS FALKENSTEIN. 




Elder George Ness Falkenstein 



IX 



INTRODUCTION 



It is a difficult undertaking to write the history of an 
organization or an institution covering a period of more than 
two hundred years. The truth of this statement becomes 
increasingly clear when one reflects upon some of the major 
events in American history which have occurred during the 
past two centuries. A number of the congregations included 
in the area covered by Southern District of Pennsylvania were 
organized more than thirty years before the Declaration 

of Independence was signed. 
The first congregations were 
under the political jurisdiction 
of the King of England, 
George III. These churches 
continued and prospered 
through the years of the 
French and Indian Wars, the 
Revolutionary War, the War of 
1812, the Civil War, and a 
World War. Probably no- 
where was the impact of the 
slavery question felt more 
keenly than along the Mason 
and Dixon Line. 

Again, this period of more 
than two centuries has with- 
out doubt witnessed greater 
social, economic and industrial 
upheaval than any other 
thousand-year period in the 
history of mankind. The 
epoch-making inventions, the 
establishment of national pub- 
lic education, migration across 
a continent, startling scientific discoveries, expanding com- 
merce, rapid travel, and ease of communication have deeply 
affected the life of the Church of the Brethren in Southern 
Pennsylvania as it has every one throughout the country. 

There is another factor which makes the writing of a his- 
tory covering this early period in the life of our church 
difficult. It is the inadequacy of reliable records. However, 
such records as have been available, and the memory of those 
older, were drawn upon in writing the most authentic history. 
Carlyle said, "history is the essence of innumerable 
biographies". In a large measure, this is true. Great move- 
ments invariably revolve about great personalities. Conse- 

XI 




A. C. Baugher, M.S., Ph.D. 

President of 
Elr'zabethtown College. 



Introduction 

quently, the history of the Southern District of Pennsylvania 
will devote considerable space to the biographies of individual 
leaders and their families. It must of course be understood 
that it is impossible to mention all whose names should be 
brought forward. Time and space make this impossible. 

The committee appointed to write the history of the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania has indeed been fortunate 
in securing the services of Doctor J. Linwood Eisenberg as 
editor. His education, experience, and interest qualify him 
for this task. His many years in the educational work of the 
State as a dean, and a president of a State Teachers College 
for almost a quarter of a century, his wide experience in the 
ministry and his acquaintance with the genius of the people 
about whom he writes, enable him to not only assemble 
records, but to write clearly about a people to whom he 
himself belongs. 

Those who read this history should remember that history 
is more than a record of past events. It is a witness of what 
has happened. The proverbial saying that "history repeats 
itself", is not even a half truth. The events of the human 
family are certainly more than a merry-go-round. They are 
more like a spiral upward. As you read this history we hope 
you will see the gradual unfolding of a human drama as it is 
taking place among the people of the Southern District of 
Pennsylvania. We trust that in it may seem the pattern of the 
Kingdom of God, slowly but surely unveiling iteslf. This then 
becomes the sincere message of the book. 

A. C. BAUGHER. 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
March 29, 1941 



XII 



PREFACE 



^pmmmm*^ 



The Editor, reared in the Coventry Church and familiar 
from early childhood with the Germantown church through 
reports of my honored father, John Y. Eisenberg, given every 
four weeks after his Sunday visits to Germantown and my own 
periodic ministry at that historic spot, has found real pleasure 
in bringing together the historical data of Southern 
Pennsylvania. Without that early contact, and the acquaint- 
ance with Brother Abraham 
II. Casel of Harleysville, ■Hi hmh 

Pennsylvania, who knew 
thoroughly the History of 
the Early Church, the task 

would have set % 

great to undertake. 

My acquaintance in ^ 

youth with practically all of 
the leaders of the church in 
the troublesome days of the 
decade 1880 to 1890 gave 
me an understanding of 
many of the problems of the 
early days of the congrega- 
tions of Southern Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The above background 
combined with an interest in 
history caused me to accept 
the invitation of the His- 
torical Committee to edit the 
History. 

The credit for this 
volume in general belongs to 
the Historical Committee 
of Southern Pennsylvania 
consisting of Elder G. W. Harlacher, Chairman; Sister Sudie 
M. Wingert, Secretary; Elder A. S. Baugher, Treasurer; 
Sister Annie Sheets, and Brother M. E. Sollenberger. The 
work with this committee has been most pleasant. 

The Committee began its work in 1934 by suggesting a 
general plan to each congregation and requesting the appoint- 
ment of an individual or a committee to gather the data. This 
plan was followed. Most of the material was given into the 
hands of Sister Wingert who checked and coordinated it. 
The chapters on the congregations were therefore for the most 
part written by individuals or committees of the several 

XIII 




J. Linwood Eisenberg, 

A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 

Pastor of the Shippensburg 

Church of the Brethren, Editor. 



PREFACE 



churches. The chapters on special activities of the district 
were prepared in the same way by individuals or committees 
of people most directly interested in the special activity. 

To all who have worked so faithfully, I wish to express 
my own appreciation and that of the committee. 

Acknowledgment is made to the various histories of the 
church and other historical documents from which data has 
been used. 

Most of the cuts have been made from pictures secured 
through the several congregations. It is regretted that the 
pictures of some of the older leaders are not available, mostly 
because they conscientiously objected to having the pictures 
taken. 

Appreciation is due the Brethren Publishing House at 
Elgin for the cuts that they were able to lend for the period 
of the printing. 

Every effort has been made to have this history a record 
of facts. Where possible, dates have been checked against 
documentary records. In some cases statements are based 
upon the memory of older interested people. The minute 
books of the several congregations have furnished much of 
the information. District and Annual Meeting minutes have 
been checked carefully. An effort has been made to have 

names spelled accurately. 

The Editor has found it 
necessary to eliminate much 
of the material because of 
duplication. In some cases 
eliminations have been made 
because the material was not 
of an historical nature. 

It is especially fine that 
the Forward has been written 
by Elder George N. Falken- 
stein and the Introduction bv 
Dr. A. C. Baugher, both sons 
of Southern Pennyslvania. 

Too much credit cannot 
be given to Sister Sudie Win- 
gert for her careful historical 
research which took her to 
the court records of the sev- 
eral counties, college and 
public libraries, church rec- 
ords of individual congrega- 
tions, District and Annual 
Meeting* records, as well as 
personal visitation and much 
correspondence. The manu- 

XIV 




Miss Sudie M. Wingert 

Secretary of the Historical 
Committee. 






c 



Preface 



script nas been read by her with special reference to historical 
data. 

I wish too to express my appreciation to my very helpful 
wife, Emma Johnson Eisenberg, for her numerous suggestions. 
She has been especially helpful in correcting the English of 
the manuscript. 

The editing of this material has been a labor of love and 
increasing interest. 

I trust you will be patient with shortcomings and any 
inaccuracies which may appear. 

With the prayerful desire that the present generation 
may be inspired to more faithful service in the work of the 
Master this volume is submitted for your consideration. 

J. LINWOOD EISENBERG, 
July 28, 1941 Editor. 



XV 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Forward VIII 

Introduction IX 

Preface XI 

List of Illustrations . .XXI 

Chapters 

I. Origin of the Church 2 

Germany, United States, Southern Pennsylvania 

II. Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 7 

Antietam 7 

Back Creek 42 

Big Conewago — Divided into Lower and Upper 

Conewago, 1849 51 

Boiling Springs 56 

Buffalo 58 

Carlisle 70 

Chambersburg 76 

Codorus 81 

Falling Springs 99 

Greencastle 107 

Hanover 113 

Huntsdale 121 

Lower Conewago 126 

Lower Cumberland 139 

Lost Creek 143 

Marsh Creek 149 

Mechanicsburg 154 

Mt.^ Olivet 156 

New Fairview 160 

Newville 165 

Perry 167 

Pleasant Hill 169 

Ridge 171 

Shippensburg 174 

Sugar Valley 181 

Upper Codorus 190 

Upper Conewago 209 

Waynesboro 224 

XVII 



Table of Contents 

Page 
Welty 259 

York — First and Second Churches 2G2 

York — Madison Avenue 285 

III. Our District — District Meetings 290 

IV. Brethren's Home 309 

V. Children's Aid Society 316 

VI. Missionary Activities of the District 327 

VII. Missionary Reading Circle 337 

VIII. Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 346 

IX. Women's Work Organization 365 

X. Young People's Work 375 

XI. Education 330 

Board of Christian Education 380 

Relation to Juniata College 383 

Relation to Elizabethtown College 386 

XII. Annual Meetings 392 

XIII. Related Organizations 404 

XIV. Special Biography 4X0 

XV. Biographical List 420 

XVI. List of Congregations and Present Presiding Elder 435 



• 



XVIII 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Page 

The Germantown Meeting House in 1899 
Historical Committee 

Elder George Ness Falkenstein VII 

A. C. Baugher, President, Elizabethtown College VIII 

J. Linwood Eisenberg, Editor X 

Miss Sudie M. Wingert XI 

Schwarzenau 

Coventry Brethren Church — Second Building 4 

Map of Southern District 6 

Home of Bishop William Stover 8 

Prices Church — Built 1795 11 

Prices Church— Built 1890 14 

Ministers and Wives, Antietam Congregation 18 

Elder Jacob Snider and Wife 27 

Benjamin E. Price 28 

Preaching Appointments, Antietam 30 

Rouzerville Church, Antietam Congregation 36 

Brandts Church • • • 42 

Upton Church ■ • 44 

Shanks Church 45 

Home of Elder John Shank ♦ • • 45 

Mrs. Mary Catherine Emmert Miller and Granddaughter IQ 

Elder J. Kurtz Miller 47 

McConnellsdale Meeting House 48 

Elder M. B. Mentzer and Wife 48 

Elder Edgar Landis and Wife 49 

Ezra D. Auman and Wife 49 

Elder John Lehner and Wife 50 

Elder David A. Faust 50 

Facsimilie Teller's Sheet— Election 1847 54 

Boiling Springs Church of the Brethren 56 

Bakers Church, Lower Cumberland 57 

Pastor J. Albert Cook and Wife 58 

John G. Royer 59 

House Where Buffalo Church Was Organized 60 

Isaiah Beaver and Wife 61 

John L. Beaver and Wife 62 

Deacon Jacob S. Shively and Wife 63 

Minister Samuel Starook 64 

Elder Mervyn W. Mensch and Wife 65 

Elder Green Shively and Wife 65 

Buffalo Church in 1864, Present Meeting Place 67 

Buffalo Church Group, 1941 69 

Carlisle Church and Parsonage 71 

XIX 



List of Illustrations 

Page 
Elder H. M. Snavely, Pastor ?2 

Ministers and Wives, the Carlisle Church 73 

Carlisle Church, Deacons and Wives 75 

Chambersburg Church 77 

Auditorium Chambersburg Church 77 

Ralph G. Rarick, Pastor, and Wife 78 

Official Board, Chambersburg 79 

Parsonage, Chambersburg Church 8q 

Salem Meeting House 81 

Keeney Homestead 82 

Original Joseph Y. Myers Home 33 

Codorus Church 04 

Elder Jacob Shamberger §<• 

Elder Jacob M. Myers and Wife 87 

Elder D. Y. Brillhart and Wife 89 

Elder J. H. Keller and Wife 90 

Elder S. B. Myers and Wife 93 

Official Board, Codorus Church 95 

Elder S. C. Godfrey and Wife 96 

Pleasant Hill Church, Codorus Congregation 97 

New Freedom Church, Codorus Congregation 97 

Shrewsbury Church, Codorus Congregation 98 

Elder William C. Koontz and Wife 99 

Elder Samuel E. Gearhart 99 

Elder Welty G. Smith 100 

Ministers of Falling Springs Congregation 101 

Browns Mill Church 1Q3 

Hade Church 105 

Falling Springs Church 106 

Exterior of Church, Greencastle 109 

Interior of Church, Greencastle 110 

Official Board, Greencastle Ill 

Choir, Greencastle H 1 

Elder C. E. Grapes 1X2 

Hanover Church as Remodeled by Mission Board 114 

Hanover Church, Remodeled 1841 114 

Elder B. F. Masterson and Wife 115 

Elder D. H. Baker 1 15 

Elder Henry S. Baker and Wife 116 

Deacon Edward K. Hetrick and Wife 116 

Deacon Cornelius Weaver and Wife 117 

Deacon Wilson B. Harlacher 117 

Elder B. C. Whitmore and Wife 118 

Elder B. F. Kline and Wife 119 

Elder J. E. Myers and Wife 120 

Elder J. M. Stauffer and Wife . 120 

Minister E. E. Baugher and Wife 120 

Elder Daniel Keller 121 

Elder Jacob Hollinger and Wife, Mary Ann 122 

XX 



List of Illustrations 

Page 

Huntsdale Church 123 

Huntsdale Church in 1941 123 

Elder John F. Stamy and Wife 124 

Huntsdale Official Board 125 

Facsimilie of Vote on Division and Election, Lower Conewago 127 

First Certificate 128 

Bermudian Church 129 

Wolgemuth Church 131 

Altland Meeting House 132 

Elder Hezekiah Cook 134 

Elder O. W. Cook and Wife 135 

Ministers and Wives, Lower Conewago 136 

Elder S. S. Sheffer and Wife 137 

Deacons and Wives, Lower Conewago 138 

Mohlers Church — Lower Cumberland 141 

Elder William Murphy and Wife 142 

Good Will Church, Lost Creek Congregation 144 

Elder George Strawser and Wife 144 

Smith Homestead, First Love Feast in Lost Creek 145 

Elder J. E. Rowland and Wife 146 

Elder C. E. Grapes and Wife 146 

Elder J. A. Buffermeyer and Wife 147 

Oriental Church, Lost Creek Congregation 147 

Free Spring Church, Lost Creek Congregation 148 

Richfield Church, Lost Creek Congregation 149 

Marsh Creek Church of the Brethren 150 

John M. Myers and Wife 152 

W. A. Keeney and Wife 152 

Elder W. G. Group and Wife 153 

Elder B. F. Lightner and Wife 153 

Church and Parsonage, Mechanicsburg 155 

Elder J. Lloyd Nedrow, Pastor 155 

Mt. Olivet Church 157 

Pastor Earl S. Kipp 158 

Elder Wm. H. Miller 159 

New Fairview Church and Congregation 161 

Elder Michael Markey and Wife 163 

Ministers and Deacons, New Fairview Congregation 164 

Newville Church 166 

Elder S. M. Stouffer 166 

Pastor Cletus S. Myers 167 

Three Springs Church, Perry Congregation 168 

Elder Edmund D. Book 169 

Elder G. Howard Danner 170 

Elder John Fogelsanger 171 

Ridge Church of the Brethren 173 

Shippensburg Church 176 

Deacon W. M. Fogelsanger and Wife 176 

Deacon Wm. H. Fogelsanger 177 

XXI 



List of Illustrations 

Page 

Elder Ross D. Murphy, First Pastor 178 

Elder David Fogelsanger 173 

Presiding- Elder S. A. Myers and Wife 179 

Official Board, Shippensburg 180 

Daniel Shroyer and Wife 182 

Eastville Church, Sugar Valley Congregation 183 

Alfred Miller and Wife 184 

B. Frank Long and Wife, Elder Charles Schwenk and Wife 185 

John Boone and Wife 185 

Chester Shroyer 18G 

Home of Christian Royer 191 

Farm of Henry Hohf 192 

First Church at Black Rock 194 

Black Rock Church Remodeled 194 

Chestnut Grove Church 196 

Home of Samuel Miller 197 

Elder E. S. Miller and Wife 198 

Four Generations of Ministers — The Baughers 199 

Home of Aaron Baugher 201 

Barn of Aaron Baugher 201 

Elder A. S. Baugher and Wife 202 

Elder A. S. Baugher Family 203 

Deacon Jonas Royer and Wife 204 

Deacon A. M. Wolf 204 

Deacons, Upper Codorus Congregation 205 

Deacons Wives, Upper Codorus Congregation 205 

Elder George M. Resser and Wife 206 

Minister Raymond Bucher and Wife 207 

Minister Henry E. Miller and Wife 207 

Deacon L. S. Fuhrman and Wife 207 

Minister Mark Wildasin and Wife 207 

Minister Daniel Mummert and Wife 208 

Presiding Elder N. S. Sellers and Wife 208 

Hampton Meeting House 211 

Mummert Meeting House and Graveyard 212 

Interior Mummert Meeting House 212 

Latimore Meeting House 214 

East Berlin Meeting House 215 

Ladies' Aid Society, Upper Conewago Congregation 219 

Elder Samuel S. Miller and Wife 220 

Presiding Elder J. Monroe Danner and Wife 221 

Official Board, Upper Conewago Congregation 222 

Singing Class, Upper Conewago Congregation 223 

Church of the Brethren, Waynesboro — Built 1830 225 

Interior of Church of Brethren, Razed in 1903 225 

Waynesboro Church — Dedicated October, 1904 229 

Sunday School Room — Waynesboro Church 229 

Elder Jacob F. Oiler and Wife 231 

Elder James M. Moore and Wife 234 

XXII 



List of Illustrations 

Page 

Elder Levi K. Ziegler and Wife 235 

Elder George L. Detweiler 235 

Ministers of Waynesboro Congregation 236 

Facsimilie of Report of First Sunday School, Waynesboro 241 

Sunday School Board of Waynesboro Congregation 242 

J. J. Oiler and Wife 249 

Elder John B. Ruthrauff 254 

Welty Church 260 

Elder J. I. Thomas 261 

Facsimilie of List of Regular Meetings, Beginning 1859 — York 262 

Elder Jacob Aldinger 263 

First Church of York 265 

Elder Joseph A. Long 267 

Elder Edward K. Ziegler, Pastor 271 

Presiding Elder J. J. Bowser 272 

Old Second Church Building — York 275 

New Second Church Building — York 276 

Interior Second Church Building — York 277 

Ministers of York Church — 1939 , 284 

Elder M. A. Jacobs 286 

Madison Avenue Church — York 287 

Ministers of Madison Avenue Church 288 

Brethren's Home 309 

Group at Dedication of Home 310 

Wealthy Burkholder, First Matron 311 

Superintendent of Home and Associates 313 

Trustee Board of Home 314 

Shuman Family, Children's Aid Society 318 

Home of Children's Aid Society 319 

Mame Hollinger Nell, First Superintendent 320 

Children of the Home 323 

Mrs. L. H. Leiter, Executive Secretary 324 

Board of Trustees of Children's Aid Society 325 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Newcomer and Daughter, Josephine 326 

Robert L. Ditmer, Pastor of Van Dyke Mission 332 

Mission Board 335 

Wilbur B. Stover 337 

Edith R. Newcomer, First Secretary of Reading Circle 339 

John R. Snyder 340 

Mrs. Elizabeth D. Rosenberger 341 

Missionary Reading Circle Certificate 343 

Ministerial Board 346 

Mrs. Grace Ziegler, First President 367 

Mrs. W. L. Widdowson, Director of Children's Work 369 

Women's Work Officers, 1941 372 

Elder J. E. Rowland and Wife 376 

District Cabinet, Young People 378 

Board of Christian Education 381 

Founders Hall, Juniata College 284 

XXIII 



List of Illustrations 

Paae 

Elizabethtown College 3^9 

Dr. R. W. Schlosser, Former President 390 

Jacob Price Home, Antietam, 1866 394 

Isaac Latshaw Farm, Big Conewago Annual Meeting, 1819 398 

George Royer Home, Annual Meeting, 1929 398 

Peter Dierdorff Farm, Big Conewago Annual Meeting, 1844 399 

Michall Bashore, Mexico, Lost Creek Annual Meeting, 1885 403 

Michael Bashore, Mexico, Lost Creek Annual Meeting, 1885 403 

Facsimilie Deed by Jacob Moor to John Ness 410 

J. B. Emmert # . 4^3 

H. P. Garner 4j 5 

Mary Quinter 432 

Mrs. Nora Arnold Lichty 439 

Minor Myers 432 

J. M. Blough 433 

Adam Eby 433 

Mrs. Christina Kulp 433 



XXIV 






CHAPTER I 



ORIGIN OF THE CHURCH 

In 1708 at Schwarzenau, in the Province of Wittgenstein 
in Hesse-Cassel eight pious souls were baptized in the river 
Eder in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the 
Holy Ghost. Alexander Mack was led by one of the number 
into the river and immersed three times. Then Alexander 
Mack baptized the other seven in the same manner. 

A new congregation called the German Baptist Church 
was organized with Alexander Mack as the leader. 

From the beginning the Schwarzenau congregation 
flourished. Bitter persecution followed. In 1720, the congre- 
gation under Alexander Mack fled for protection to 
Westervain in West Friesland. 

Peter Becker, a man of great fervency in prayer and a 
leader of singing organized the first emigration of members 
to America. They landed at Germantown in 1719. 

On Christmas Day 1723, a group met at Peter Becker's 
nouse in Germantown, to plan for the first immersion in 
America. Present at this meeting were the members near 
Germantown and six persons, led by Martin Urner, from the 
Schuylkill country (now Coventry). 

Peter Becker was chosen to act as Elder. Six candidates 
for membership were baptized in the Wissahickon by trine 
immersion. In the evening the first Love Feast was held in 
the house of John Gomorry. Now the congregation was 
organized. The next year October 1724, they decided to make 
a general visitation to the Brethren in the whole country. 
Brother John Jacob Price of Indian Creek was visited. On 
November 8, 1724, they held a Love Feast at Coventry in the 
home of Martin Urner. Two were baptized. Previous to this 
Love Feast, on November 7, 1724, the Coventry Congregation 
was formally organized. 

At Coventry the Brethren decided to continue the journey 
to the Conestoga country. As a result of this visit five were 
baptized in the Apostolic manner in Piqua Creek. 

On the 12th day of November, 1724, the Conestoga 
Congregation, the third in America, was organized. This was 
spoken of as the Ephrata Church as it was near the present 
town of Ephrata. 

Before the Revolutionary War the Brethren tended to 
move southward along the Piedmont Plateau. Inspired by the 
missionary spirit and desire for good farm land they came into 
Southern Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia. 




< 

SJ 

W 
o 



Origin of the Church 3 

In 1738 in Hanover township, York County, Elder Daniel 
Leatherman organized the Little Conewago Congregation. 

In 1741, the Big Conewago Congregation was organized. 
The first minister was George Adam Martin who came from 
Coventry by way of the Conestoga Church. 

In 1752, John Price from the Indian Creek district moved 
into the Antietam area. About the same time Elder Abram 
Stouffer who was ordained by Peter Becker came into the 
same area. This was the year in which the congregation was 

organized. 

It was in 1758, that Elder Jacob Tanner organized the 
Codorus Congregation. 

In a period of 20 years, 1738 to 1758, four congregations 
in Southern Pennsylvania were organized mostly by Brethren 
from Germantown, Coventry, or Conestoga Country. 

From 1790 to 1823 three other congregations, Lost Creek, 
Marsh Creek, and Cumberland were organized. From these 
seven original congregations the present thirty congregations 
have developed. 

DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Showing the Seven Original Congregations and the 
Congregations Developed from Them: 

1738 — Little Conewago (Now Upper Codorus) 
1906— Pleasant Hill 
1912 — Hanover 

1741 — *Big Conewago 

1849 — Upper Conewago 
1849 — Lower Conewago 

1752 — Antietam 

1800 — Manor, Md. 

1810— Welsh Run, Md. 

1850 — Back Creek 

1910 — Chambersburg 
1930 — Greencastle 
1836— Ridge 

1910 — Chambersburg 
1924 — Shippensburg 
1866 — Falling Spring 

1910 — Chambersburg 
1930 — Greencastle 
1922 — Waynesboro 
1934— Welty 

1758 — Codorus 

1895 — York, First Church 

1939 — York, Madison Avenue 
1908 — New Fairview 



sBbgljrUb^A^ 




oo 



a 

OS 



PQ 

- 
Z 
o 
o 

a 

GO 

• • 

o 

05 

P 

E 

O 

> 

O 



Origin of the Church 



1790 — Lost Creek 

1826 — Buffalo 

1878 or 1880 — Sugar Valley 

1805 — Marsh Creek 

1821 or 1823 — * Cumberland 

1836 — Upper Cumberland (name changed to Hunts- 
dale in 1925) 
1914 — Carlisle 
1925— Newville 
1836 — Lower Cumberland 
1843 — Perry 
1914— Carlisle 
1916— Mt. Olivet 
1926 — Mechanicsburg 
1934 — Boiling Springs 
* Divided and original congregation ceased to exist. 




■TV • K^~-«p^e]( 






if bul*^*^ 



*8-t^£t^<L/r 









CHAPTER II 
CONGREGATIONS OF SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ANTIETAM CONGREGATION 

Antietam Congregation, according to the best informa- 
tion obtainable, existed as a mission of the churches of Eastern 
Pennsylvania and of York County some years before its organ- 
ization in 1752. It was then known as the Conococheague 
District. In 1752, John Price moved to Antietam District from 
near Philadelphia. About this same time Bishop Abraham 
Stouff er of Conewago or Germantown, who had been ordained 
by Peter Becker, moved into this community and effected a 
church organization. It is said that Geo. Adam Martin 
assisted in this work for awhile. In a few years because of 
William Stover was chosen to the ministry and ordained 
ill health Abraham Stouff er returned to Conewago. 

In 1754, William Stover and his family came here from 
Germantown, having a short time before come from Switzer- 
land. He took up land about two miles west of the Prices. 
They soon became connected with the Church of the Brethren. 
Bishop of the Congregation. 

In 1772, Nicholas Martin wrote to Alexander Mack refer- 
ring to the great revival held in the Antietam District by 
Brother Martin Urner of the Coventry Congregation, increas- 
ing the number of disciples many fold. (See Brumbaugh's 
History of the Brethren.) It is probably after this revival 
that the Antietam and the Conococheague churches began to 
function as separate congregations. 

"For the first fifty years the brethren suffered many 
privations on account of the French war in 1755, the Revolu- 
tion 20 years later, and subsequent Indian wars together with 
many inconveniences incident to a newly settled country, as 
our part of the state was at that time. The dread of the 
Indian's tomahawk and scalping knife, was everywhere felt. 
In the morning before going to the fields to work, the farmer 
and his sons often bid good-bye to the balance of the family, 
fearing they might not return, or if permitted to do so, would 
find their loved ones murdered by the Indians." (From 
Brethren Almanac 1879.) 

Under the guiding hand of their first resident Elder, Wm. 
Stover, the congregation worshipped in houses. Brother 
Jacob Miller was elected to the ministry, and in 1765 moved to 
Virginia. The congregation prospered until in 1880, when 
just before the unfortunate division, there were 400 members 






8 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 



fePtli 






* 















. 







Home of "Bishop" William Stover, Antietam Congregation 

Services were held , in upper rooms of the larger building. The wall 

around garden was built as protection from the Indians. 

on the list. In 1922 just before Waynesboro was organized 
into a separate congregation, there were 900 members. Be- 
fore the Welty church was organized in 1933 there were 450 
members ; after this organization there were 273 members. 

As was customary with other congregations, the Elder 
was elected for life. The seniority in the ministry was verv 
much in evidence, even to the seating behind the table. The 
next oldest in the ministry always sat next to the Elder and 
was considered in authority according to his place in the 
pulpit. The deacons likewise recognized seniority. The 
oldest in office was seated directly across the table in front of 
the Elder with the next oldest beside him, and so on to the 
youngest. This order continued for nearly 100 years. 

The Church was democratic in form but when the Elder, 
after consultation with the other ministers and deacons, made 
any declaration, it was usually accepted by the Congregation. 
The members of the Antietam Congregation, being of German 
decent, all spoke German in the early days. The sermons were 
all delivered in German until about 1830 after which time 
both German and English were used. After 1875, all English 
was used in the pulpit. In making the yearly visit by the 
deacons confirming the members in the Faith, the language 
most agreeable to the members was used. In 1900 very few 
members could even converse in German. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 9 

In 1881 about 100 members withdrew and formed what 
is known as the Old Order German Baptist Church. A record 
of events was preserved from this date. All definite records 
prior to the summer of 1880 have been lost to the Church. At 
that time Brother D. P. Saylor, of Monocacy Congregation was 
chosen Presiding Elder and retained this position until 1882 
when Brother J. F. Oiler was ordained. 

In 1885 the Antietam Congregation entertained the Dis- 
trict Meeting of Middle Pennsylvania. Twenty-two congrega- 
tions were represented. In 1891 the Antietam Congregation 
asked the District Meeting of Middle Pennsylvania to grant 
the Southern part of the District to be formed into a separate 
district. This was not granted. The Antietam Congregation 
had District Meetings again in 1898, 1910, 1912, and 1929, 
either at Prices or Waynesboro. 

There were four Annual Meetings held in the Antietam 
Congregation as follows: 1810 — In the Antietam Meeting 
House; 1829 — On a farm owned by Brother George Royer 
about one mile west of Antietam ©r Prices Church ; 1847 — On 
the farm of Brother Isaac Deardorff, two miles west of An- 
tietam or Prices; and 1866 — On the farm of Brother Jacob 
Price, one-half mile east of Prices Church. These pioneers 
were willing to open their homes in a hospitable manner in 
accord with the teachings of the New Testament. They not 
only "entertained strangers" but opened their homes to the 
community where all who would could meet and worship God 
and study His Word together. During the first 47 years of 
the existence of Antietam Congregation, all of the public wor- 
ship and funeral services were held in the homes of the people. 

Many of the homes were built to meet the needs. Often 
the partitions of adjoining rooms were made so that they could 
be moved. Benches were used for seats. These could easily 
be stored away when not in use. At very large meetings the 
services were held in the barn to accommodate more people 
who sat on the benches without backs, on the hay, or any other 
available space. Services were held in the open when 
occasion demanded. 

The Charter 

Some persons in the Antietam Congregation, were con- 
cerned about doing things in a legal way. In 1896 they pro- 
posed to the church that Weltys Church and Graveyard be 
incorporated according to the laws of Maryland. This was 
brought up in the Church Council a number of times, until, on 
April 10, 1900, the Articles of Incorporation presented by a 
committee for that purpose, were accepted. The committee 
was told to proceed and have the church property incorpo- 
rated. This called for a yearly election, instead of appoint- 
ments, of the Board of Trustees. 



10 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

On September 21, 1907, it was decided to incorporate 
both the church property, and the cemetery at Prices in sepa- 
rate corporations. The trustees of both Waynesboro and 
Prices were to look after the incorporation of the church, 
framing the articles of incorporation, and make the petition 
to the court. This was done and the Charter duly granted. 

The Charter called for six trustees to be elected, no capi- 
tal stock, to be perpetual, and business not to exceed $5,000.00 
a year, except gifts and bequests. The petition was signed bv 
D. M. Baker. 

On December 7, 1752, John Price, recently of Philadelphia 
County, had purchased land in Antrim township from John 
Leatherman, George Grubb and Richard Ocain. In the survey- 
ors description of the 430^ acres "with 13 corners of irregular 
angles, he specified as land marks black oak, pine tree, marked 
white oak, and hickory grub and post. The buildings were by 
the spring near the center of the tract of land." 

On October 31, 1765, he procured a patent from Thomas 
Penn and Richard Penn, as is recorded in Deed Book A. A., 
volume 7, page 80. Through this flowed the west branch of 
Little Antietam Creek. 

On August 8, 1786, he purchased 284* acres and allow- 
ances, from William Irwin a part of the tract called "Dry- 
berry" and by deed of May 6, 1780, William Peterson granted 
him another tract of land, for, and in consideration of £8,075. 
This is in what is now known as Quincy Township. See Price 
Family History, by Wanger. 

At a place convenient to a little spring on a gentle grade, 
sloping towards the sunrise, the Brethren wanted to build a 
meeting house, and have a permanent place in which to wor- 
ship God as they saw wise, near by a place which was con- 
secrated for the burying of their dead. Accordingly, they 
secured from Brother John Price, for 10£, one acre of land for 
a church property. The transfer of this land with the appur- 
tenances was made to Christian Royer and Andrew Friedley 
as trustees for the First Day German Baptist Congregation in 
Antietam. 

From the date of the deed, March 31, 1797, it would seem 
that the church was not built until 1797. When we consider 
the patent for the land was not given until 15 years after it 
was settled upon, and then changed hands once or twice, it is 
not hard to believe the tradition true that Brother Price gave 
the land, and all "having a mind to work" built the house in 
1795 as the corner stone designates. Then to make it a per- 
manent possession of the congregation, they purchased the 
ground for the amount specified and secured a deed. Some- 
thing like this was done in later years, by some of his descend- 
ants, in selling ground for the cemetery. If this is true, then 
the tradition, the statement on the corner stone, and the deed 
all agree. 




o 

CO 
00 



-a 

CD 
00 



T3 



OS 

O -u 



o 












E3 

cr 
w 

U o 



c 

■+J 

PQ 

03 

c 
o 



- 



12 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

This church was built of stone with a door at the side and 
a preachers stand or table at the opposite side. The roof was 
made with home-made split shingles. In 1826 an addition 
was built to this church. No information is available as to the 
dimensions of this building. It was in this building that the 
Yearly Meeting and Love Feast was held in 1810. In 1830 
another addition was built to the church. 

(In January, 1890, it was decided to build a new church of 
brick. This building was started and finished inside of five 
months and dedicated on June 14. It was located on nearly 
the same spot as the old one.) 

The southwest end of the building was divided from the 
main room by folding doors or removable partition. In The 
summer time, for Love Feasts and special occasions the parti- 
tions were removed, throwing the whole into one large audi- 
torium. On the northeast end was built a kitchen with a large 
fire-place where the kettles for cooking the meat for Love 
Feasts and special occasions hung. 

A part of the northeast end was divided into a store room 
for dishes and other utensils not often used. The kitchen was 
used for a vestibule or cloak room for the sisters. 

The church was heated by a large ten plate stove located 
near the center of the main room. Wood was used for fuel. 
About 1870 a large egg shaped heating stove for coal burning 
was installed. 

On the northwest side a long table stood back of which 
sat the ministers with the Elder at the head next to the sisters' 
side of the church. The wives of the preachers and deacons 
sat on the front rows on the sisters' side of the house. None 
of the seats had back rests except those for the ministers. 

For lights, tallow candles were used. There were one or 
more on each of the four walls and one on the preachers table. 
The preacher would often hold the candle near his book for 
better light. About 1855, coal oil lights were used instead of 
"tallow dips". These were thought by some to be an innova- 
tion. They were soon recognized as a necessity. One of these 
lamps hung in the basement of the brick church for 48 years 
until electricity was installed in 1938. 

Church Houses 

In 1872 there were five houses for worship in the 
Antietam Congregation: Prices, Snowbergers, Amsterdam, 
Welty and Waynesboro. (For description of the latter two 
see Welty and Waynesboro Congregations.) 

The Brick Church 

After church at Antietam on December 22, 1889, it was 
decided to hold a special council in the Waynesboro church on 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 13 

January 1st, 1890, to consider building a new church house 
at Antietam, as many believed it was much needed. Several 
tentative subscription lists had been started, and kept in 
circulation. At this council, as only ipl,751.00 had been sub- 
scribed, few people being present, it was deferred to the 
regular Quarterly council at Antietam on January 16. At this 
regular council, not enough money was subscribed, and a 
soliciting committee was appointed to canvass the whole dis- 
trict, and report at a special council in Waynesboro on 
January 27, 1890. This committee was Daniel M. Baker, 
Christian Newcomer, Benj. E. Price, Jacob Snider, Isaiah F. 
Hollenberger, Josiah Burger, and Michael Kriner. 

At the council meeting of January 27, 1890, it was de- 
cided by unanimous vote that the old building should be torn 
down and a new one built. The following building committee 
was appointed: Benj. E. Price, secretary-treasurer; Samuel 
Kauffman, Michael Kriner, Michael Jacobs, and Samuel 
McPherren. 

A paper containing nine paragraphs, defining the work 
of adopting plans and specifications, passing on work done, 
letting contracts, receiving subscriptions, issuing receipts, etc., 
was adopted by the council. The spirit of building ran high. 

On February 1, the building committee and others met 
on the ground, and decided that the new church should be 
placed a little southeast of the exact spot of the old one, and 
the work of dismantling the 95 year old house began. 

On February 12, 1890, Brother W. J. Swigart, of Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa., began a series of meetings in the Waynesboro 
church. All were so well pleased with him, that it was de- 
cided to have him preach the dedicatory sermon in the Spring. 

On Saturday morning, June 14, 1890, the day set for the 
Love Feast and the dedication of the new church, a large 
crowd assembled for services; William J. Swigart, of Hunt- 
ingdon, preached the sermon, and declared the act of dedica- 
tion. At the noon recess, two persons were received into the 
church by baptism. On the next morning, Brother Tobias F. 
Imler was advanced to the second degree of the ministry. At 
the close of the morning services, two more persons were 
baptized. This was reported to have been the largest crowd 
of people ever assembled in Prices church. 

The new church — 50 by 70 feet — was built of brick, 
using the stones .of the old church for foundation. The cost 
was $2,886.37 in cash and $532.70 in donations of material, 
and labor. The church has a large auditorium, with two 
doors on the northwest side, and the preacher's table on the 
southeast side, just the reverse of the old stone church. At the 
northeast end of the auditorium is an ante room, a hall, and 
stair-way. The main room was equipped with seats with 
backs which could be lifted and placed on the arm rests, 
making tables, or reversed facing the opposite way, for con- 



14 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




■.::v.^,--- :**:■;;:. -fe^ ' ' 



Prices Church — Built in 1890 



venience at the Love Feasts. Two long permanent tables were 
used for the preachers, behind which the preachers assembled 
at the opening of the services and sat in order of seniority 
with deacons on the opposite side as in the old church. 

The attic was divided into two rooms for sleeping apart- 
ments, furnished with beds and "chaff ticks" and some 
clothing. These were usually filled at Love Feast times. 
Some people sat up all night and talked, others slept on the 
benches when not disturbed by talking. Mrs. John Burger 
said she slept on a bench and placed her shoes under her head 
for a pillow. As the days of automobiles approached, fewer 
stayed overnight and the attic was not used. 

There is a basement under the entire house arranged 
with a kitchen in one end and the larger part for a dining 
room for special occasions at Love Feast, on Saturday noon, 
Sunday morning and Sunday noon. Meals are given free to 
all who wanted to partake. 

On April 28, 1917, the Sister's Aid Society of Waynesboro 
reported that they had the basement floor cemented at a cost 
of $165.00. In December, 1890, two large egg shaped heat- 
ing stoves were put up, and remained in use until 1937 when 
stoves of the "Heatrola" type were installed. The large "Ten 
Plate" stove that was formerly used in the parlor of Brother 
Michael Jacobs was placed in the ante room and is still in use. 

In July 1891, rope matting was placed in the aisles, and 
across the front of the church. This has now been replaced 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 15 



by a rubber floor covering. The entire floor was all on one 
level, indicating the equality of all. In April, 1917, it was 
decided to place a six inch platform to elevate the preachers 
for the convenience of both the speakers and the hearers. 

In September, 1923, William Shoemaker presented to the 
church a walnut pulpit desk, in memory of the late Elder J. B. 
Ruthrauff, with whom he associated for many years in the 
pattern shop of the Geiser Manufacturing Company. 

When this church was built, it was lighted by four large 
round wick oil lamps suspended from the ceiling. These func- 
tioned well in their time. In 1916 they were replaced by car- 
bide lamps. Since the summer of 1938 electricity is used. 

When the church was built in the horse and buggy days, 
thought was also given for the comfort of the horses, and in 
dismantling the church, they carried the roof and framing to 
a suitable place just north of the church site, and made a shed 
large enough for the horses and buggies, feed troughs and 
grain bin. 

This shed continued in use not only for horses, but was 
much used by wandering vagrants, "knights of the road" or 
tramps, as a place to congregate. In 1939 it was sold and 
taken to frame a barn near Shady Grove, by Mr. Frank Welty. 
One Sunday morning about 1915, the minister came through 
a steady rain to church and found only four persons there for 
worship, but a larger number of tramps in the shed ; after 
they refused an invitation to come to the church services, the 
minister went to the shed, gave the wanderers a talk, and had 
prayer with them. He then returned to the church and 
continued the worship in the usual way. 

The spring mentioned in the original deed continues to 
flow, although a very light stream, and wastes its freshness 
on the nearby meadow. 

Business and Church Meetings 

There have been no records found of any business or 
council meetings of the Antietam Congregation prior to 1880. 
There is a record that shows that Josiah Fahrney was church 
secretary in 1878 and that he was succeeded in 1881 by his 
brother, Daniel. 

We know, as was the custom with other congregations, 
that the Elder automatically became the presiding officer by 
virtue of his seniority when the place was vacated by death 
or removal of former Elder. 

Most of the business of the congregation was done at the 
close of the regular meetings when the congregation was 
dismissed and the members asked to remain. 

When more important business was transacted a special 
day was appointed and later regular council meeting days 
were set. At these meetings the preachers and deacons 



16 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

usually met an hour or two before the appointed time to 
arrange the business for the council. Between 1890 and 1900 
the need was recognized for more time for the preparation 
and systematic arrangement of the business for council. An 
evening was set about a week before council when the "official 
board" would meet to arrange for the coming council. These 
were known as "official meetings". The councils met at 
10 A.M., recessed at noon, and continued until business was 
finished. When problems could not be settled in the local 
councils they were referred to the "Yearly Meetings" of the 
entire Brotherhood. 

The Antietam Congregation seemed to be able to adjust 
her difficulties and local business to the satisfaction of all, 
until in 1866 when the first committee was sent from the 
Annual Meeting. No report of the committee can be found, 
but the personnel of this committee was : H. D. Davy, John P. 
Ebersole, John Wise, John M. Holsinger, and John G. Clock. 
Since then, there have been committees from the Annual 
Meeting at various times. Because of their prominence, the 
Elders of the Antietam Congregation were often among those 
who formed the committees at the Yearly Meeting to adjust 
matters sent from the churches. 

It will be interesting to note here that there were two 
definite customs of the church which caused much business at 
times : That of the doctrine of avoidance, and the manner of 
receiving again into fellowship, those that were once dis- 
membered. Avoidance was practiced among nearly all the 
churches in 1850. Avoidance was the attitude of the church 
towards one who had lost fellowship because of having com- 
mitted some sins mentioned in the Bible. In the 1849 Annual 
Meeting, the minutes show the following: "So they adhered 
simply to the word, had no intercourse, no dealings of any 
kind, with such persons and did not eat with them at the same 
table or out of the same dish, at any common meal, while they 
were in this state of avoidance. Only acts of charity toward 
them . . . ." The companion in marriage was not permitted 
the communion while the companion was under the ban. 
This was in accord with Gal. 5 : 19-21, and I Cor. 5 :1-13. The 
Annual Meeting of 1892, declared that we hold the doctrine 
of avoidance as heretofore. 

In restoring members into church fellowship, after con- 
fession was made and forgiveness asked, it was the duty of the 
penitent member to go to each person, in his seat, to receive 
acknowledgment of forgiveness, and restoration, by the rig , 
hand of fellowship. This custom was never repealed by council, 
but fell into disuse and became obsolete as time passed. This 
was practiced in Antietam as late as 1880, in major cases. 

According to the best information obtainable, up to this 
date (1940), the following list gives the names of the resident 
bishops, and the time they served the church in that office. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 17 

This does not include "Adjoining Elders", having temporary 
charge of the congregation: 

Abraham Stouffer 1752-(?) 

William Stover -1800 

Daniel Stover 1800-1822 

Jacob Holsinger 1825-1848 

Jacob Fahrney 1841-1848 

William Bayer 1848-1863 

Joseph F. Rohrer 1867-1873 

Jacob Price 1867-1880 

Jacob F. Oiler 1882-1897 

Jacob Snider 1897-1900 

Daniel M. Baker 1900-1902 

John B. Ruthruff 1902-1910 

C. Rush Oellig 1910-1919 

H. M. Stover 1919-1932 

M. C. Valentine 1932- 

After the Annual Meeting said the Elders should be 
elected at least once in three years, it was decided in 1918 to 
elect an Elder for one year. 

The Church decided to close the church house against 
dissenters except for funeral occasions according to the laws 
of our country. At least two or three times the privilege of 
using church house was sought but each time our church 
decided to stand by her former decisions. 

Both the regular church services and the church council 
meetings have undergone a wonderful change in the last 
century. A more systematic manner of doing church business 
was used : not so much trying to accomplish the most good 
with the least energy expended ; not so many compulsory 
methods as more pleasing persuasive plans ; not so much for 
putting people out of the church as trying to get the church 
members more active in the progress of the work of the church. 
After the new church was built and when they realized 
that in times past, some of our councils were not as well regu- 
lated as should be, there was passed in July 31, 1890, the 
following: "Resolved, that we the Brethren and Sisters, 
assembled in council, adopt the following rules for the 
government of our council meetings from henceforth : 
"1. That no person shall be allowed to speak with- 
out first rising to his or her feet, except officials 
of the church or others in arranging matter to 
be brought before the meeting. 
"2. That no persons shall be allowed the privilege 
of gathering together in groups of two or more 
on any subject, but if they have anything to say 
on the subject under consideration, to say it to 
the church so that all can have the benefit of 
their deliberations, except in arranging matter 
to be brought before the church. 




T3 

oi 

CO 
• I— I 



> 

O 



W 



CO 



2 T3 



O 

H 

o 



H 
H 

< 

O 

w 
> 



Q 



- 

GO 



"a 
> 



co 



T3 

u 

<D 
S 



CO 



CO 



X3 

CO 



r^ 


<D 


bjo 


O 


•i— i 


• i— i 


*-i 


tf 


o 


• 


■+-> 


s 


+j 




<w 


• 




£ 




CO 




Sh 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 19 



"3. If two or more persons should rise to speak at 
one time, and contend for the right to the floor, 
the Moderator or Elder, should decide who 
should speak first. 

"4. No person shall withdraw from the meeting 
while it is in session, for the purpose of going 
away, without the consent of the Elder or 
Moderator. 

"5. It shall be the duty of the Elder or Moderator 
to endeavor to have the foregoing rules faith- 
fully carried out." 

In 1904, at a council in Prices, a Brother at council could 
only be called to order by the congregation singing "Jesus 
Lover of My Sour. In 1920-1930 when any difficult matter 
arose for discussion and could not be easily settled, it was 
either put to vote or deferred, and at the next meeting, settled 
more quietly. 

The business end of the church seemed to grow more 
toward advancing the Kingdom of God, than advancing 
one's self. 

In 1922, a committee was appointed to revise the by-laws 
of the Antietam Congregation. In 1933, a code of by-laws 
was accepted by the church in council assembled. In church 
services as late as 1888, it was the common custom to open 
the services by singing a hymn, and when the congregation 
became somewhat settled, to have a hymn formally announced, 
a Scripture read, and prayer offered by the one designated by 
the Elder in charge, or if he was not present, by the minister 
oldest in office. After prayer and another hymn the Elder 
would either "Take up the subject and preach the main 
sermon or ask whom he would to preach". 

Whoever agreed to preach would ask a deacon to read 
a designated chapter, which he either read or asked the next 
deacon in line to read. The minister then preached, after 
which some other preacher bore testimony or preached a 
second sermon, announced a hymn, and led in prayer. The 
Elder in charge announced another hymn, made the announce- 
ments, and declared the meeting dismissed. At Prices about 
the year 1899, one of the younger ministers said, "If you will 
allow me, I will read a portion of Scripture. " He proceeded 
to read and announced his text, and preached. After that 
other preachers began to preach after reading their own 
chosen and studied Scriptures. 

In the Spring of 1875 at the Love Feast in Prices Church, 
there were many people gathered for the occasion. Many 
visiting ministers came to enjoy the services. Among these 
ministers who came was Brother S. Z. Sharp from Kisha- 
coquillas Seminary, a young minister of more than ordinary 
ability, but very humble and agreeable. 



20 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

At the Sunday morning service the large stone church 
was filled with people, and the preacher's seat back of the 
table was well filled. The oldest men sat next the Elder or 
Bishop. When the meeting was formally opened, Bishop 
Price spoke to the minister next to him, saying, "Now 
Brethren, take up the subject", and as courtesy prevailed, the 
Brother extended the privilege to the next minister and so on 
until it came to the last man, Brother Sharp, who was the 
youngest minister present and a stranger and having no one 
else to extend the privilege, looked up to the Elder for his 
consent. Bishop Price was somewhat annoyed at the situation. 
Hoping to relieve matters in a gentle way, he said in Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch, "Canst du Deutsche sprechen," and Brother 
Sharp replied, "O Yaw," and Brother Price then could only 
say, "All recht," and the young minister arose and preached 
in clear German the finest German sermon that had been de- 
livered from that pulpit for many years. This brought many 
favorable comments from the people who talked German. 
According to the best information obtainable, this was the 
last sermon delivered in German at Prices church. 

In the Antietam Congregation singing was always used 
as a part of the worship, agreeing with the Scriptures, 
Ephesians 5:19 and Colossians 3:16. In the early life of the 
congregation, there were not many printed hymn books and 
fewer yet with music. Not a few of the members were unable 
to read fluently even if they had hymn books. Our Brethren 
made the best of the situation and not only read the hymn, but. 
read again two lines which were sung from memory, and then 
two lines more which were sung, and so on through the hymn. 
This was called "lining the hymn''. The lining of hymns and 
the reading of the entire hymns continued to be practiced to 
some extent until the council of April 17, 1886, when it was 
granted that the minister might use his descretion as to 
reading the hymn before it was sung, but he should always. 

"line it". 

The reading of the hymns was interferred with by an- 
other condition prevalent at the time. When they had eve- 
ning services, the only light they had in the early part of the 
19th Century was the "torch" of pine shavings, and the "tallow 
dip". In the middle of the century, the kerosene lamp made 
its appearance. 

The tall pulpit lamp was used in the church in Waynes- 
boro until gas was installed when it was taken to Weltys and 
used until the new church was built. 

In the hymn books the meter of the poem was marked, 
S. M., short meter; C. M., common meter; L. M., long meter; 
so the person "giving rise to the tune" might be reasonably 
sure of the tune he sang. In the early 1870's Brother Jacob 
Stover, father of W. B. and H. M. Stover, usually led the 
singing, because he had been a singing school teacher in his; 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 21 

early years. One day he was asked how he could always fit 
the right tune to the hymn the preacher announced, and ho 
said : "That's easy, while the preacher is reading the hymn, 
I count the words in the lines and fit it to a tune the people 
know." The person leading the song just started it according 
to judgment as to pitch; sometimes too high and sometimes 
too low, but mostly about the right pitch. About 1890 a pitch 
fork was used, then a pitch pipe. All voice music used today 
in church services in the Antietam Congregation is without 
the aid of organ, piano, or orchestra. This is agreeable to the 
large part of the congregation. 

In 1880-1890, when more. people could read music, there 
was published by the Brethren a hymn book containing the 
music, or as they called it, "set to music". This "Brethren 
hymnal", was purchased by the people who had hymn books. 

There was some prejudice against the hymnals by those 
who did not read music, and in buying books for the new 
church at Prices the following minute was passed at close of 
church services of June 22, 1890: "It was decided that if we 
get books to distribute in the congregation at Antietam Meet- 
ing House for the use of spectators to engage in the singing 
service, that we get our common hymn book, and not the 
hymnal." 

Since Brother John Harbaugh had solicited and secured 
enough money to buy the hymnals, it was decided to repeal 
the former minute and purchase three dozen hymnals on 
April 16, 1891. At a later council in 1892 it was decided to 
get hymnals for use in the new church in Ringgold. 

In 1893, Brother Chalice Baker was permitted to hold a 
singing school in Waynesboro, provided it would not cost the 
church anything. Later C. M. Glick held a singing school in 
the church and on January 28, 1899, provision was granted 
H. M. Stover to hold a singing school provided he made 
arrangements with the janitor. 

Since so many of our people were learning to use the 
music in singing, the church bought hymnals for general use 
in the meeting houses. The use for the hymn books ceased 
entirely. 

For 25 years or more before it came into open council in 
1888 there was much controversy whether or not the single 
or double mode of feet washing should be used at our Love 
Feast. Some argued "our old Brethren always used the 
double mode therefore we ought not to bring in any 
innovations". Others said, "According to reading of the 
Scripture the single mode was following more closely the 
example by the Master." In the double mode two persons 
would go together and the one wash the feet of two or more 
brethren and the other would follow immediately and wipe the 
feet with the towel wherewith he was girded. Then it would 
be given to another set who did the same and so on until all 



22 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

were washed. It thus occurred that some person had no part 
in the washing or wiping of feet. 

In the single method each brother girded himself with a 
towel and washed the feet of a brother and wiped them him- 
self, and after greeting the brother with a holy kiss, handed 
the towel to the next brother who did the same. The sisters 
on their side of the house did the same as the brethren. On 
January 20, 1893, the church in council assembled decided 
to change from the double mode of feet-washing to that of the 

single mode. 

It would be of interest to insert here what the church 
services were in the first part of the 19th Century. The 
following is quoted from "The Brethren's Encyclopedia"' 
published in 1867 by Elder Henry Kurtz before there were 
any classified minutes published. 

Order at Common Meetings for Worship 

"The general order is: First, united prayer and praise 
by singing a hymn; then a brief exhortation to humbly wor- 
ship God in spirit and in truth, followed by prayer upon our 
bended knees, two or three praying aloud, one after the other, 
the last repeating the Lord's Prayer, each Amen repeated by 
the congregation. Then reading one or more portions of 
Scripture, followed by preaching, one, two or three speaking 
alternately; then, if candidates for baptism are presented, 
Matthew 18:10-22, is read and commented upon, and every 
candidate is asked to assent to the rules laid down by the 
Saviour in that chapter ; after that, the meeting is brought to 
a close, as it was commenced, by singing, exhortation and 
prayer." As meetings used to be held at the houses of mem- 
bers, the members would, out of love, prepare a refreshment 
for those who had come from a distance, and whoever would 
accept the invitation. It is particularly necessary to mention 
the latter for a better understanding of what follows. 

Order at Love Feasts 

The Love Feasts for 50 years prior to 1900 were con- 
sidered a feast of mental and spiritual food, beginning on 
Saturday morning at 10 o'clock with a sermon or two in one 
session before noon, when a lunch for all was given free and 
horse feed was provided in the places for feeding horses. 

If a minister or a deacon was to be elected or voice 
of the church was to be taken for presiding elder or 
ordination, it was taken at this time when a good representa- 
tion of the church membership was usually present. Then 
announced later, generally the next morning when the work 
was completed by installing the newly elected person in his 
office. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 23 

The meeting was called to order by the singing of a hymn, 
a sermon was preached on some phase of church doctrine, and 
closed with prayer. 

A short intermission was taken after a special exhorta- 
tion for all members to be present at the next session which 
would be the examination service. 

This intermission usually lasted from fifteen to thirty 
minutes when the meeting was called together by singing. 
This service was considered only a continuation of the service 
and was not opened with prayer but with singing. One 
brother was asked to read the 11th chapter of I Corinthians 
without comment and another brother minister preached the 
sermon on some phase of our fitness for communion and 
explaining the prayer veil, the need of plain dress and sepa- 
ration from the world, and great need of full consecration. 
This was called the examination service. At its close when 
called to prayer the liberty was extended to any one who felt 
moved to pray audibly, and especial mention was made that 
this liberty was granted to the sisters. Sometimes a sister 
would take the liberty. 

After a hymn, prayer and announcements the session was 
closed and preparations made for the supper. It was always 
sure to be announced that lunch would be provided in the 
basement for those who were not members of the church, and 
horse-feed in the shed for horses. This was according to the 
council of April 4, 1888. 

When the audience vacated the main room, the deacons 
and any others who were willing to help, prepared the tables 
for the fellowship supper, known among them as the Lord's 
Supper. The supper prepared and on the tables, the people 
were called together by singing, and the Bishop gave a few 
words of exhortation and instruction, some brother read the 
13th chapter of John from 1 to 30. The Bishop told one at 
each table to begin the service of feet-washing. 

It was a favorite custom at this time to have exhortations 
and explanations given by the visiting ministers. When all 
had finished a blessing was asked by someone designated by 
the Elder, and they all ate together. If there was time more 
talks were given. When all had finished another brother re- 
turned thanks. At this time the end of the preachers table 
was cleared and the material for the communion was placed 
upon it and carefully covered with a white cloth. Then the 
Elder turned the services over to the visiting minister who was 
to officiate at the communion. The officiating minister then 
asked someone to read the nineteenth chapter of John. While 
he was reading the bread was prepared by him convenient 
for passing. 

When the chapter was finished, the bread prepared and 
covered again a few appropriate words were spoken about 
love, a perfect union, with their symbol, the right hand of 



24 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

fellowship was extended accompanied with the kiss of peace 
from one to another until each was greeted and a complete 
circle was made among the women as well as among the men. 
The handshake and kiss were considered the third ordinance 
to maintain the communion's sacredness. The Elder then 
spoke of the bread as being the broken body of our Lord and 
as all the communicants stood he offered prayer. When the 
people were again seated the bread was broken by each 
brother and given to the one next until all were served. The 
Elder served the bread to each sister. 

Extreme silence was maintained while the bread was 
passed in memory of the Body of Christ being broken for us. 
Mark 15:33 was often quoted. The congregation engaged in 
singing while the cup was passed for the cup represented the 
Blood that was shed for us that redeemed from condemnation, 
from the curse of the law and from sin. One cup was used 
for the brethren and one for the sisters, replenished by the 
attendant when necessary. In 1915 a number of communi- 
cants were usually about twice as many sisters as brethren. 
To meet the needs, two cups were used by the sisters who 
were divided into two sections and the last sister in each sec- 
tion passed the communion to the first in the other section, 
thus instead of two separate sections it was a double section 
or a figure eight and the unity was not broken. All were 
united by the symbol of a perfect circle or endless chain. 

The officiating Elder always served the communion of 
the bread and cup to the sisters prior to 1910. 

In those days, it was a question with some if the sisters 
should not be granted the privilege of passing the cup and 
breaking the bread the same as the brethren. This question 
arose again and again until the Annual Meeting of 1910 
granted that privilege. On October 16, 1910, Antietam in 
council assembled decided that the sisters should break the 
bread and pass the cup in communion service. 

It may be noted here that regular fermented wine was 
used for communion purposes until 1890 when it was decided 
hereafter to use only unfermented grape juice at the Love 
Eeasts 

After the bread was passed the officiating clergymen 
poured some wine from each container into each of the two 
or more communion cups. He then took one cup in his hand 
and while all stood a prayer was offered for a blessing on the 
cup. The cup was then passed from one to another until all 
were served in the same manner as was the bread. 

The communion being finished a general prayer was 
offered with the whole audience standing. An opportunity 
was given for announcements by any of the visiting ministers. 
A closing hymn was sung and the meeting dismissed. 

Attention was called to the presence of visiting members 
and they were invited into the local homes for lodging and 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 25 

breakfast. Some provision was made for lodging in the loft. 
Breakfast was served for those who stayed at the church or 
lodged in the vicinity near the church. 

Sunday morning at ten o'clock services began again with 
a talk to the young people. Devotions opened in the usual 
way and officers who may have been elected the day before 
and not installed were properly and fully installed before 
church services began. 

These services were regular in form but special in pur- 
pose and were usually very well attended. Usually two or 
three visiting brethren spoke, but one had the mam address. 
Dinner was then served to all who cared to remain and the 
Love Feast for that time was over. 

The territory belonging to the Antietam Congregation, 
at first, was the Cumberland Valley, from mountain to moun- 
tain, and from the Cumberland County to the Potomac River, 
approximately 35 miles wide and 50 miles long. This was 
reduced in size by new congregations forming, until 1934 it 
was a crescent in form about 20 miles wide from end to end, 
and about six miles wide at its greatest width. It is situated 
east, north, and west of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

From the original Antietam Congregation the following 
congregations were formed: The Manor, Maryland, 1800; 
Welsh Run, 1810; Ridge, 1836; Back Creek, 1850; Beaver 
Creek, Maryland, 1858; Falling Springs, 1866; Hagerstown, 
Maryland, 1893; Shippensburg, 1924; Chambersburg, 1910; 
Waynesboro, 1922; Broadfording, 1924; Long Meadows, 
Maryland, 1926; Greencastle, 1930; Weltys, 1934. 

Among the more prominent families in the church before 
1800, were the Bonebrakes, Foremans, Friedleys, Holsingers, 
Kneppers, Macks, Prices, Royers, Stovers, Snivelys, and 
Stoners, Snowbergers. 

Following are the names of the deacons who have 
served in the Antietam Congregation from the year 1825: 
Andrew Friedley, Sr. ; Jacob Price, Sr. ; Joel Senger, John 
Stouffer, George Royer, Christian Good, Dr. John Bock, David 
Bock, William Royer, Abram Lookabaugh, Isaac Deardorff, 
Daniel Senger, John Stoner, Joseph F. Rohrer, William 
Shilling, William Wiseman, Jacob Zarker, Michael Jacobs, 
Frederick Bakener, David H. Bonebrake, Jacob Holsinger, Jr. ; 
Jacob Friedly, Joseph Burger, I. F. Hollenberger, Benjamin 
E. Price, Jon S. Oiler, David Newcomer, Henry Baer, Sr. ; 
Daniel M. Baker, David Geiser, D. B. Mentzer, Samuel Welty, 
Benjamin Friedly, T. F. Imler, J. Mitchell Stover, B. F. Barr, 
Joseph F. Emmert, Samuel Knepper, J. E. Demuth, A. M. 
Good, Samuel Fitz, Daniel H. Bare, Daniel Flohr, Frederic 
Strite, H. M. Stover, Daniel D. Rinehart, D. W. Hess, George 
Eigenbrode, John Hoffman, Daniel Howe, Christian 
Newcomer, Charles W. Reichard, Walter Rowe, William 
Thorp, Abraham Heefner, Edward E. Snader, A. M. Rebok, 



26 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

James C. Heefner, Ira L. Wingert, W. Harry Demuth, George 
P. Cahman, George W. Smith, Edward Spangler, George L. 
Socks, Clarence Dick, Walter West, Charles Marker, 
S. Edward Cline, Bruce Hoffman, Willis Rice, William Hovis, 
Cyrus Bonebrake, Frank Barkdoll, Earl Snader, M. Carrol 
Valentine, John C. Emmert, J. Leslie Embley, John A. Fraver, 
Charles Hoffman, Daniel I. Eigenbrode, Oram Leiter, William 
Marker, Daniel Hoffman, Norman King, A. W. Hartman, 
Hobart M. Shockey, Wilbur R. Kline, James B. McClain, 
Frank S. Sniveiy, John Heffner, Jr. ; Fred S. Sprenkle, Ralph 
Shaeffer. 

The greatest number of deacons at any one time was in 
1920 and 1921, when 30 names appeared on the list. 

The territory was then 10 miles square, and the 
membership was 900. 

Ministers and Elders of the Antietam Congregation 

Abram Stouffer ordained in Germantown by Peter 
Becker. 

William Stover emigrated from Switzerland A.D. about 
1752, ordained by Abram Stauffer and died A.D. 1800. 

George Adam Martin ordained in Germantown by Peter 
Becker and moved to Stony Creek, Pennsylvania. 

John Price came here in 1752 and died in 1803. 

Jacob Miller was elected in 1765 and moved to Virginia. 

Daniel Stover was born 1757 and died 1822. 

John Royer. 

Jacob Holsinger elected 1820, ordained to the Eldership 
or Bishop in 1825. 

Jacob Fahrney elected October 23, 1825, ordained Bishop 
October 23, 1841. 

Henry Strickler elected to the ministry October 23, 1825. 

Israel Singer elected April 28, 1833, was formerly a 
deacon and was elected to that office June 2, 1830. Born 
1799; died 1849. 

David Foglesanger elected to the ministry November 3, 

1833. 

Daniel Keefer elected to the ministry on October 18, 

1840. 

William Boyer elected May 30, 1841, ordained bishop 

1848. 

William Etter elected to the ministry on May 19, 1844. 

Jacob Price elected November 16, 1845, was ordained an 
elder October 22, 1867, and died 1883. 

David Bock elected to the ministry March 15, 1846, 
formerly a deacon and elected to the office October 13, 1844. 
Went with Old Order Brethren. 

Isaac Renner elected October 18, 1846. Afterward 
moved into the Monocacy Church, Maryland. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



27 



Joseph F. Rohrer elected January 16, 1850. Ordained an 
elder October 22, 1867. Formerly a deacon elected October 
18, 1846. 

Abram Stamy elected October 22, 1848. Formerly a 
deacon to which office he had been elected April 25, 1847. 

Joseph Gipe elected July 30, 1848; formerly a deacon 
elected May 19, 1844. 

Joseph Garver elected May 18, 1851, but never served 
in the ministry. 

Daniel Holsinger elected to the ministry April 18, 1852. 

Jacob F. Oiler elected to the ministry April 18, 1852. 
Advanced to eldership in 1881. Died 1897. 

Daniel F. Good elected at Weltys August, 1860. 
Advanced to eldership. Went with Old Order Brethren. 

Abram D. Golley elected to the ministry 1863; formerly 
a minister in the Seventh Day Baptist Church. 




. ; 



Elder Jacob Snider and Wife 



Jacob Snider elected at Prices August 23, 1874. 
Advanced to second degree June 23, 1878, and ordained an 
elder October 9, 1897; formerly a minister in the River 
Brethren Church ; died December 9, 1900. 

Daniel M. Baker elected May 2, 1875 ; formerly a deacon; 
advanced to the second degree June 23, 1878, and ordained 
an elder October 9, 1897; died 1910. 

John D. Benedict was elected to the ministry at Prices 
Church May 2, 1875, advanced to the second degree. Died 
since 1900. 

B. E. Price elected to the ministry at Prices Church 
February 22, 1881; was formerly a deacon; advanced to the 
second degree January 18, 1883. Died June 5, 1896. 

T. F. Imler was elected to the ministry at Weltys Septem- 
ber 24, 1885, and forwarded June 15, 1890. 



28 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



W. B. Stover received 



. s 




■: . : ■ 



Benj. E. Price 



by letter September 27, 1881 
— given letter January 17, 
1892 — received again Janu- 
ary 25, 1894, with his wife 
and endorsed by congrega- 
tion for missionaries on 
foreign field and recom- 
mended to the Annual Meet- 
ing. Letters granted May, 
1901. 

John B. Ruthruff elect- 
ed to the ministry August 6, 
1892; forwarded to second 
degree July 28, 1894; elect- 
ed an elder May 24, 1902; 
ordained August 9, 1902. 
Died March 25, 1910. 

C. R. Oellig elected 
January 28, 1893; forward- 
ed May 17, 1896. Ordained 
an elder May 15, 1910. 

H. M. Stover, formerly 
a deacon, was elected to the ministry November 1, 1898; for- 
warded May 13, 1900; and ordained an elder July, 1913. 

F. D. Anthony received July 27, 1899, by letter, a minister 
in second degree. 

Isaac Riddlesberger received by letter October 19, 1902, 
in second degree; elected an elder May 14, 1910. Elected to 
the ministry, September, 1882. 

H. P. Garner elected May 1, 1909; forwarded July 22, 
1911. 

D. B. Mentzer elected May 1, 1901; formerly a minister 
in the Old Order Church, forwarded July 22, 1911. Died 
March, 1928. 

W. C. Wertz received by letter January 1, 1911, in the 
second degree. 

Melvin A. Jacobs received November 6, 1910, by letter in 
second degree and was ordained an elder July 26, 1913. 
Moved to York, Pennsylvania, in 1926. 

Aaron Newcomer was elected to the ministry November 
9, 1913, at Weltys; was formerly a deacon; advanced to 
second degree, November, 1915. Died November 13, 1935. 

John E. Rowland received by letter; advanced to second 
degree July 26, 1913. 

Trostle Dick elected November 25, 1915, at Prices. 

Harry Muck elected November 14, 1915, at Weltys and 
ordained May 29, 1926. 

Harvey D. Emmert received March 4, 1914, by letter; 
minister in first degree. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



29 




Aaron Newcomer and Wife 

Laban Leiter elected to the ministry May 24, 1919, at 
Weltys. Died in 1928. 

M. C. Valentine was elected a deacon in 1920 and 
licensed May 27, 1923. Ordained May 28, 1932. 

Sherman Eshelman was elected November 18, 1923, and 
licensed renewed 1924, but never installed. 

J. I. Thomas was received by letter July 25, 1925. 
Ordained November 19, 1932. 

Walter A. West, formerly a deacon, was licensed May 4, 
1929, and was installed May, 1930. 

Willis Rice, formerly a deacon, was licensed May 4, 1929, 
and was installed May, 1930. 

Sunday Schools 

The Sunday schools in the Antietam Congregation were 
due to the desire of the members to teach the Gospel and to 
witness for Christ. 

The first Sunday school to be organized was in Waynes- 
boro, in 1872, with Bishop J. F. Oiler as Superintendent. The 
record shows on May 5, 1877, the meeting opened by J. F. 
Oiler and closed by John Gehr; collection 47 cents; weather 
very pleasant; address by John Gehr; visitors present, Amos 
Garver, Mr. Bowman; lesson, II Kings 4:12-20. For other 
information, see Waynesboro. 

Weltys Sunday School 

Weltys Sunday School was organized in the Spring of 
1886 with J. Mitchell Stover as superintendent and William 
Swope as assistant. This was a union Sunday school. They 
used Cook's Sunday school literature. The church was also 
a union church for a number of years. For other information 
see Weltys. 



30 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Pennersville Sunday School 

In the summer of 1917 much thought was given to 
finding a place for missionary activity. Being moved 
with the spirit of missions, Brothers H. J. Bare and H. M. Stover 
arranged to have a prayer meeting conducted in the village 
of Pennersville in the outlying borders of Antietam territory. 

In the house by the spring where there had been held a 
kindergarten, the prayer meeting was held each Thursday 
evening with marked success. One evening there were 78 
persons present. This was sufficiently encouraging, so a 
Sunday school was started in 1918 in the same house with 
H. J. Bare superintendent and his wife one of the teachers. 

Prayer meeting and Sunday school continued to grow. 
All who were willing to work were used irrespective of church. 
The Sunday school rented the house where services were 
being held and sub-rented the eastern part to a family with 
the privilege of using the rooms as class rooms. Later after 




Preaching Appointments Antietam 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 31 

moving into the larger quarters belonging to the organization 
of Red Men, and since Sunday school was held in the after- 
noon, it was decided to have church following Sunday school 
or in the evening. As the school and prayer meeting con- 
tinued to grow, a vacant lot was bought in 1919 in view of 
building a church. In 1920 this lot was sold to an advantage 
and the Red Men's hall was purchased for $800 and equipped 
for church and Sunday school as reported in council October, 
1920. 

After Brother Bare could no longer care for the Sunday 
school on account of ill health, Brother M. A. Jacobs cared for 
the Sunday school in the morning. Brother Jacobs took with 
him teachers from Rouzerville as Brother Bare did from 
Waynesboro. After Brother Jacobs went to York in 1926, 
the Sunday school was looked after by the preachers and 
others until January, 1927. Earl Kline was elected in 1927 
to act as superintendent with a promise that the church would 
pay one dollar a trip toward his expenses. 

In 1930, a committee of five brethren were appointed to 
act as superintendent. The committee was Earl Kline, Wilbur 
Kline, Hobart H. Shockey, Henry Shockey, and J. L. Embly. 
This continued for a year and finally ceased to function 
entirely. 

Several series of meetings were held in Pennersville with 
some success by Brethren John R. Zook, of Palmyra, Pennsyl- 
vania; John Graham, of near Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, 
and M. A. Jacobs. There were about twenty-five members 
added to the church by these efforts. 

In 1931, church services were held once a year, but in 
1934, the trustees rented the church to the Seventh Day 
Adventists, who continued services for nearly two years until 
February, 1936, when they removed their personal belongings 
and returned the custody of the church to the owners. 

In 1935 a petition was presented to the council asking 
for church services once a month to be held by our own people. 
This was the afternoon of the second Sunday of each month. 
The attendance was not so good at these services. 

Rouzerville Sunday School 

On the afternoon of the day of dedication of the Rouzer- 
ville Church, May 29, 1910, seventy-two persons gathered 
by appointment and organized a Sunday school by electing 
the following officers: Superintendent, H. J. Bare; First 
Assistant, George Socks; Second Assistant, Rufus Smith 
Secretary, Addison Haugh (not yet a member of the church) ; 
Assistant Secretary, Mrs. Nellie Haugh; Treasurer, C. E. 
Brown (not yet a member of the church) ; Chorister, A. R. 
Deardorff ; Assistant Chorister, George Socks; Librarian, Alan 



32 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Speilman (not a member of our church) ; Assistant Librarian, 
Charles G. Weber. 

Everybody seemed pleased and they decided to meet each 
Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock for Sunday school. The 
school grew to such an extent that on December 18, 1910, there 
were 132 present, which was the largest attendance at any 
meeting for that year. The following year the record shows 
the largest attendance to be 179. 

It seemed wise to hold the Sunday school in the morning 
before church services and while the attendance materially 
fell, it soon began a more permanent growth. It was due to 
the constant self-sacrificing work of the teachers and officers 
that made the Sunday school a success and proved a profitable 
place for the church. From the Sunday school came most of 
the persons who made application for baptism at times of 
evangelistic meetings. 

Each year the Sunday school held an outing at what 
seemed the most convenient time and place, but the most 
popular time was July 4, and the place was Herr's Grove, just 
northeast of Rouzerville. At these outings a program with 
the devotional exercises was always held in the afternoon. 

The rally day about 1925 was held on the first Sunday 
in October and has regularly been observed on that date ever 
since. In the summer of 1927, a committee composed of C. E. 
Brown, Mildred Baer (afterward Mrs. Morris McClean), and 
H. M. Stover was appointed to frame a constitution which was 
formerly adopted December, 1928. Amendments have been 
added to meet the needs of the Sunday school as occasion 
demanded. The superintendents who have served at Rouzer- 
ville were: H. J. Bare, B. F. Kline, Cyrus Bonebrake, M. A. 
Jacobs, W. A. West, and Frank Snively. 

Prices Sunday School 

After the new church was built at Prices in 1890 there 
began to be some desire for a Sunday school and at council 
meeting of April 23, 1893, the permission was given to have 
a Sunday school at Prices Church. The following organiza- 
tion was effected: Superintendent, J. D. Demuth ; Assistant 
Superintendent, Samuel Hartmen; Secretary, Henry X. 
Stoner; Treasurer, Frederick Strite ; Librarian, Mrs. I. 
Foreman. Mrs. Foreman was not a member of our church, 
but was much interested and willing to help maintain a 

Sunday school. 

This was a summer school and closed in the winter, 
usually at Christmas, as was done for several summers until 
it failed to open again in the spring. 

In 1903 Sunday school was again held in the summer with 
Brother Samuel McFerren as superintendent, closing at Christ- 
mas, which was done for two or three succeeding summers. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 33 



00 



Sunday school was again asked for at council of April 9, 
1910. In 1914 it was again organized with Brother J. w! 
Newcomer as superintendent and continued throughout the 
year, and has been continuous ever since that date. Those 
serving as superintendents were: J. E. Demuth J W 
Newcomer, Samuel McFerren, William Tharp, Samuel A 
Fnedly, S. Edward Kline, Wilbur R. Kline, and Clarence 
Hartman. 

Mount Vernon Sunday School 

As Mount Vernon school house was in the midst of a 
thickly settled district it was thought a good place to have a 
Sunday school. Accordingly, Benjamin Welty, realizing the 
necessity of moral training in the community, succeeded in 
getting Brother C. R. Oellig to start and conduct a Sunday 
school in the school house on the hill. This was in the summer 
of 1892 and also in 1893. Brother Oellig then lived near 
Good's mill. The old school house was formerly located at 
the point of the road leading to Cress Station. 

In the spring of 1896, Brother Frank Boerner in company 
with George Snider walked from town and conducted the 
Sunday school, which continued until Christmas with marked 
success. Each spring a Sunday school was organized and 
operated during the summer until an addition to the house was 
added making it a two room house and not so well suited for 
Sunday school. The Sunday school was not opened again be- 
cause the new state road made the approach to the school 
house extremely difficult. Those acting as superintendent for 
one or more summers were C. R. Oellig, F. S. Boerner, H. M. 
Stover, and Holly Garner. For about five years regular 
preaching services were held in the evening of every two 
weeks and sometimes the house was so crowded that the 
people stood. In the fall of 1911, F. D. Anthony held a series 
of revival meetings at this place, resulting in the baptism of 
six persons who were Orpha Heefner, Helen Snively, Nelle 
Gantz, Anna Sheffler, Frank Heneberger, and Charles 
Mulenix. 

Plain Hill Sunday School 

In the little brick school house on the corner of the road 
leading to Poketown from the Hagerstown road about one- 
half mile west of where Plain Hill school house now stands 
the Brethren had preaching services for many years and 
many came to the church through the influence of these serv- 
ices. Those living in the community who were interested in 
church work — the Barrs, the Bakers, the Kings, the 
Newcomers, and the Kriners — secured the permission to have 
church services in the school house once a month by the 
Brethren with the understanding that it should be kept in 



34 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

shape for school next day. The Kriners on Friday evening 
would go over and scrub the school house floor. On Saturday 
evening in cold weather they would start a fire in the big egg 
stove so as to have it warm for services the following day. 

This continued until in 1893, when a new and larger brick 
school house was built about one-fourth of a mile eastward. 
To this the church gave twenty dollars to help pay for a 
heater in the house. They were to have the privilege to the 
use of the house for religious services under the same condi- 
tions as formerly expressed. On December 2, 1893, it was 
decided to have church services each two weeks at Plain Hill. 
The following spring, 1894, Brother Frank Boerner and Mr. 
David Barnhart started Sunday school in the school house 
which functioned in the summer time for several years. 
Brother Samuel McFerren also acted as superintendent for 
one year. At the council of February 3, 1894, it was decided 
to have services each two weeks in the evenings. On April 9, 
1898, it was decided to lift the bi-monthly services at Plain Hill 
and have them in Waynesboro each alternate Lord's Day. 

Snowbergers Church 

At the southern end of the village of Glen Furney, some 
years before the Civil War, the community built a little red 
brick school house on the west side of the road, near to 
Snowberger's land. It was furnished with a large ten-plate 
stove in the center, two rows of long desks with benches with- 
out backs for the pupils, and a table and chair for the teacher. 
In this house that was torn down in 1875 or 1876, the Brethren 
met to worship God. 

As the membership grew, they needed a larger and more 
comfortable place to worship, and decided to build a church. 
The place selected was at the end of the other lane to the 
Snowbergers homestead. On August 9, 1856, the deed was 
given for one acre of ground, from George and Ehas 
Snowberger to Jacob Snowberger and Henry Bonebrake, 
trustees for the German Baptist Brethren Church, for the sum 
of fifteen and 00/100 dollars. These trustees acted as direc- 
tors of the building which had already been started, and was 
completed that same year. 

The church was rectangular, about 25x30 leet, with a 
double door on the east side, a large stove in the center, a row 
of seats next to wall nearly the whole way around the 
church and two rows of benches with backs, on either side 
of the stove. One side for the men, and the other side for the 
women. On the southwest corner of the building was the 
preachers table, facing the men, and close in front of the table 
was the deacons bench. 

George and Elias Snowberger and a maiden sister, 
Elizabeth, lived on the home place nearly all their lives. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 35 

Their love for the church or the church people was always 
prominent. They always made special arrangements to 
entertain the ministers on the day of services. 

The church was plain and comfortable. The social con- 
tact and spiritual food was very far-reaching. One account 
says that a Brother and Sister Eigenbrode, from near 
Thurmont, Maryland, would come to services on one horse, 
not both riding at the same time, but one would ride while 
the other walked. They would take dinner with some of the 
members, and return the same evening. 

Services were held once in every four weeks, until 1880, 
when it went into the hands of the Old Order Brethren who 
continued the services for some years, though poorly attended, 
and finally, about 1900 it was sold to Mr. Christian Shockey 
for a dwelling. The bodies of those who could be identified 
in the grave yard were removed. The ground was leveled 
and put in grass. Thus the Snowbergers Church continues to 
live only in memory. 

The ministers serving at Snowbergers from 1870 to 1880 
were: Joseph F. Rohrer, Joseph Garver, Daniel Holsinger, 
Jacob F. Oiler, Daniel F. Good, Jacob Snider, Daniel M. 
Baker, John D. Benedict, Abram Golley. 

Rouzerville Church 

When the unfortunate division of the church occurred in 
1881 and the Old Order Brethren secured possession of the 
Amsterdam meeting house, the conservative body of the 
German Baptist Brethren Church, now the Church of the 
Brethren, began holding services in the Amsterdam school 
house every four weeks. 

One Sunday in March, 1904, when it was raining and the 
snow was falling in big flakes, one of the ministers, H. M. 
Stover, and the janitor, Mr. Philip Wagoman, were present. 

The officiating minister and the entire audience sat to- 
gether on one seat by the stove and studied the Sunday school 
lesson. Then and there it was decided to start the movement 
to have the meetings held in the village of Rouzerville, one 
mile away, so the people could walk to church. At the next 
council of the church, April 9, 1904, the matter of moving the 
appointment was brought up, and it was decided to refer it to 
the people in the vicinity of Amsterdam and Rouzerville. 

In January, 1906, a committee consisting of C. R. Oellig, 
H. M. Stover and Henry H. Shockey was appointed to find 
a suitable place in Rouzerville to hold services. In April, 
1906, they reported having secured the Methodist Episcopal 
Church for each alternate Sunday. The appointment was 
ordered moved. 

After about two and one-half years of meeting in the 
M. E. Church, it was suggested by Mr. Lewis Brown, one of 



36 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

the trustees of that church, that we hold a series of revival 
meetings. The suggestion was taken, and in the fall of 1908 
a revival was started by one of the local ministers, which 
resulted in six persons being baptized. 

A great desire arose among the members to have a church 
of our own. A committee was appointed to solicit funds and 
buy ground for a new church. This committee, George Socks, 
Aaron Newcomer, and H. M. Stover, reported at council of 
April 17, 1909, that money had been raised, and a parcel of 
ground purchased from Harvey Hartman for $300.00. The 
report was accepted, and the committee instructed to continue 
to solicit funds for the new church. 

On October 28, J. J. Oiler, and H. J. Bare were added to 
the soliciting committee. A building committee consisting of 
Allen M. Good, Marshall Baumgardner, and Benjamin F. 
Welty was appointed. 

A few days later, a number of members met on the 
ground, and Sister Ella Socks turned the first shovel full of 
ground for the new church. Excavation began, and a corner 
stone was ordered, and later put in its proper place. 

This building was patterned somewhat after the Ringgold 
church, being in size 30x50 feet, frame with brick veneer, 
four windows on each side, two at the rear, and two windows 
and a double door at the front. Inside there is a main room, 
a vestibule and on either side a class room separated from the 
main room by rolling partitions. Above these rooms was a 




ROUZERVILLE CHURCH — ANTIETAM CONGREGATION 

Dedicated in 1910. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 37 

gallery or balcony, entered by a stairway from one of the 
class rooms. The speaker's platform at the opposite end of 
the church was built two feet high, built high purposely so 
that the people in the gallery could get a clear view of the 
speaker. A small pulpit and three chairs were the only pul- 
pit furniture. In 1932 the whole church was carpeted. A 
deep cellar was under the whole building, in which the heater 
was placed. In 1933 the entire cellar floor was cemented. 

The cost of this building was $3,288.69, and the entire 
amount was secured by gifts, and subscriptions. As the full 
amount of the subscriptions were not paid in at once, $500.00 
was borrowed from the bank to meet the emergency. The 
church was ready for dedication, with the expense of building, 
fully provided for. 

On Sunday morning, May 29, the new church was 
formally dedicated, and the sermon preached by Elder 
C. R. Oellig, of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, to a very large 
audience. Brother William H. Miller, of Newport, Pennsyl- 
vania, began a series of revival meetings, which resulted in four 
persons being received into church fellowship by baptism. The 
following year another series of meetings was held by one of 
the local ministers, Brother H. M. Stover, which resulted in 15 
persons being baptized. Nearly every year since then, a 
revival meeting has been held, until the membership surround- 
ing the Rouzerville Church has grown to be about 175. 

A Sunday school was organized in the afternoon of the 
day of dedication, of which more is given under the head of 
Sunday schools. 

A prayer meeting was soon inaugurated, and has had a 
continuous existence since its inception. 

The trustees, first elected by the church, for a period of 
three, two, and one years, respectively, were George W. Socks, 
C. E. Brown, and Benjamin F. Welty. 

The spiritual needs of the people were supplied by the 
deacons and the preachers of the Antietam Congregation, of 
which they were a part, with no designated remuneration, 
except their expenses paid when on definite church work, 
and individual gifts from the people. The pulpit was filled by 
the several ministers of the congregation, according to a pre- 
pared schedule, alternating as was most convenient for them. 
However, in the years from 1924 to 1926, and again from 
1928 to 1930, the activities were directed almost entirely by 
one person. 

Amsterdam Meeting House 

About three hundred yards east of the junction of the 
Red Run and the Falls Creek, at the cross-roads, diagonally 
across from the old saw-mill, because it seemed to be a center 
of the community, there was erected the Amsterdam school 
house. 



38 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Here the Brethren met for worship and religious educa- 
tion in the first half of the Nineteenth Century, meeting 
regularly each eighth Lord's Day for church services. 

While this building was not designed for a church, it was 
a place of warmth and shelter for those who wished to meet 

to worship God. 

After the Annual Meeting at Prices in 1866, there arose 
a feeling among the membership that a more comfortable and 
commodious, as well as a more permanent place of worship was 
needed. After much talking about a new church, arrange- 
ments were made to build on a corner of the farm of Messers 
Good and Stouffer, just across the road from the school house. 

On November 3, 1868, Mr. Abram Shockey purchased 
land from Jacob S. Good, and Jacob Stouffer on which was 
the lot reserved to be used for the church, and half acre of 
land near the church for a burial ground. 

The plot of ground for the church was a level tract, well 
set with beautiful virgin timber of oak, hickory, and willow, 
and had thereon a never failing spring of soft water. 

Enthusiasm ran high among the members, and the church 
was finished that same year. The plan was purely co- 
operative, the members giving of what they had in material, 
cash and labor. The Shockeys were so active in the work that 
in later years it was said that, "He built the church". 
Although Mr. Shockey gave the ground and most of the build- 
ing material, he did not at this time give a deed for the church 
property. In 1880, Mr. Shockey and his family went with the 
"Old Order" part of the church, and the exclusive right to 
worship in the church was given to them. 

On September 13, 1883, a deed was issued to the "Old 
German Baptist Brethren Church", and they continued to hold 
regular services in the church until the summer of 1940. 

While the meetings were being held in the school house 
at Amsterdam each eight weeks, meetings were also held in 
the school house in Rouzerville, and in Waterloo on the bank 
of Falls Creek. 

These services were held each eight weeks. After the 
new church was built at Amsterdam, the meetings were lifted 
at Waterloo and held each four weeks at Amsterdam in the 
new church. 

In 1920 the school house was sold to Mr. Marshall 
Baumgardner who converted it into a dwelling house. It was 
in this house that the conservative part of the church held 
services once each four weeks and continued until 1926 when 
the place of meeting was moved to Rouzerville. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Antietam Congregation 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Church of the Brethren in 
Rouzerville Antietam Congregation, was organized on 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



39 



January 15, 1920. The first officers were: President, Mrs 
Nettie Spielman; Secretary, Mrs. Carrie Brown; Treasurer 
Mrs. Dolhe Brown. The Aid functioned continuously, but 
sometimes were more active than at other times. Their meet- 
ings were social, in that they intensified their fellowship as 
well as helped the needy in their own and other communities. 
The purpose of their first meetings was to furnish clothing to 
needy children so that they could come to the Sunday school 
In the first two years of their existence, the Sunday school was 
more than doubled. Not having a room in the church, they 
met once a month for the business meeting in one of the homes 
Often extra meetings were held. 

In the 20 years of their existence, they had passed through 
their hands about $800.00. They gave in amounts of $10.00, 
$25.00, $50.00 for the following causes : Bethany Bible School ■ 
Green County, Virginia, Social Work; The District Brethren's 
Home ; and the Children's Home. In the home church, they 
furnished new blinds for the windows, helped pay for th« 
carpet, cementing cellar floor, and the furnace. Besides this, 
they were constantly helping with clothing, and furnishing 
prayer veils for those that were unable to pay for them They 
have laid aside at this date (1941) $100.00 for the new 
addition to the Rouzerville Church. 

The Christian Workers Meeting 

The Christian Workers Meeting at Rouzerville, Pennsyl- 
vania, was organized on January 10, 1932, for the purpose of 
advancing the Christian spirit and developing the Christian 
character and usefulness, among the young people of the 
church and the community. 

The first officers were: President, Edwin Eigenbrode; 
Secretary, Anna Swope; Treasurer, Mildred Palmer; and 
Young Peoples Director, H. M. Stover. 

They meet every Sunday evening for a while, with only a 
short program on alternate Sunday evenings. 

At these meetings many of the young people learn 
more fully, how to function in church work and to preside at 
public meetings. The male quartette which carried the 
message of song into many churches and homes was organized 
here. 

4. +u Guest s P e akers are often brought in to make addresses 
to the youth on subjects of devotion, character building, stead- 
fastness, and Christian growth. The business part of the pro- 
grams is carried on in a parliamentary way, encouraging 
the youth to express their desires in an effective manner 
Here the youth learn to take a defeat gracefully in pre- 
senting a pet idea. Here they learn to allow personalities 
to fade, and recognize that they are all a part of the church. 
Here many ideas are developed that lead to suggestions to the 



40 History Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

church council, for the advancement of Christian work in the 

community. . . 

An offering is taken at these meetings expressing their 
thanks to the Giver of all good, and to make possible the 
execution of their ideas. From time to time, they help to 
buy furnishings and fuel for the church, contribute towards 
the general church budget, and to the American Bible Society. 
These young people have contributed through nine years over 

$200.00. t x . „ 

Those who have functioned in the past are as follows: 
President, Edwin Eigenbrode, John Heffner, Jr., John 
Coleman, Laurean Smith; Secretary, Anna Swope Embly 
Edna Swope Embly, Edna Bumbaugh; Treasurer, Mildred 
Palmer Smith, Charles Muck, Thurman Smith, Eugene 
Mellinger, Calvin Bumbaugh; Young Peoples Director, H. M. 
Stover, Mitchell Embley. 

Missions Antietam Congregation 

The growth of the church was probably due to the 
earnest living of the members with their personal testimony 
to their friends and neighbors, and was carried into other 
communities by emigration of Brethren families. 

In 1772, Brother Martin Urner, who was enthusiastic m 
the revival of religion in the hearts of people, being 47 years 
of age, came into the Antietam country and held a great 
revival meeting, and many were gathered into the church ; so 
many that Elder Nicolas Martin, of near Welsh Run, wrote to 
Alexander Mack telling Him among other things that the 
church was increased many fold, and many fervently 

awakened". ._ 

In the early part of the Nineteenth Century, the names 
of William and Daniel Stover, and George and John Price 
were often mentioned in the activities of the church. 

No definite missionary work was found reported until m 
council assembled on September 20, 1884, it was decided to 
lift an offering quarterly for mission work for it is a worthy 
cause, and an offering was taken at once amounting to $8.7o. 

In 1894, on March 11, a special offering was taken a) 
help build a meeting house in Roanoke, Virginia. 

Regular contributions were made by Waynesboro Mis- 
sionary Association to the Quinlin mission work at Locust 
Point, Baltimore, Maryland. Help was given to the church in 
Washington, District of Columbia. When the mission was 
started in Brooklyn, the Antietam Congregation furnished one 
of the rooms in the home, for the convenience of out-going, 
and in-coming missionaries. . 

The parlor, and an individual room was furnished at the 
Old Folks Home, when it was established, and many other 
smaller gifts were given for the help of others. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 41 

After the Sunday school was started in Waynesboro in 
1872 and the Young Peoples Meeting started in Waynesboro 
in 1888-1892, and the Missionary Reading Circle in 1893, and 
the Missionary Association in 1893 as an outgrowth of an 
organization by the sisters, the missionary spirit grew. 
Among the charter members of the Missionary Association 
were the Boerners, Newcomers, Oilers, Prices, and Ripples. 
(See Missionary Association of Waynesboro Congregation.) 

W. B. Stover, who came into our congregation in the 
spring of 1891, being just chosen as a minister, and enthused 
with the spirit of missions, stirred up the congregation, as 
never before, with this spirit for others. With a desire to 
carry the Gospel to India, he arranged with Elder J. F. Oiler 
to canvass the Antietam Congregation, and see if they would 
not support him in that field, if the General Conference would 
see fit to send him. J. E. Demuth, a deacon, and H. M. Stover 
visited many families, asking if they were in favor of support- 
ing Brother Stover, in India, and how much they were willing 
to contribute yearly for the same; one sister (not blessed with 
this world's goods) said, "Yes, it is a good thing, and I think 
I can give ten cents a year for that work". Many responded 
liberally. A proposition was made to the mission board on 
October 4, 1892, that this congregation would assume about 
$800 toward the support of Brother Stover in India. For 
some reason he did not go that fall, but went to Germantown 
as pastor. At the council of January 20, 1893, it was decided 
that since he did not go to India those promising to support 
him would not be held to their pledge. 

In the summer of 1893, he was married, and with his wife 
did some very effective evangelistic work over the Brother- 
hood, and on January 25, 1894, he, with his wife, brought 
their church letters and were received into fellowship here. 
In March, 1894, the Antietam Congregation assembled in 
council, in the Waynesboro meeting house endorsed Brother 
W. B. Stover and his wife as missionaries for the foreign fields. 

In June of that year the General Conference decided to 
send them, and on July 28 of that same year, it was decided to 
make an every member canvass of the congregation for funds 
for the mission work in India. A committee of ten was 
appointed to do the work as quickly as possible. In October, 
1894, W. B. Stover, his wife, Mary, and Miss Bertha Ryan 
went to India as missionaries. 

Jesse B. Emmert, son of one of our deacons, J. F. Emmert, 
was sent to India in 1902. 

Holly P. Garner was sent by the church to Blue Ridge 
College, New Windsor, Maryland, and later to Bethany Bible 
School. After his marriage to Miss Katherine Barkdoll, thev 
were both sent to India as missionaries. 

The Antietam Congregation assisted Trostle P. Dick and 
H. C. Muck to both college and seminary education. For 



42 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

other missionary work see Waynesboro Congregation and the 
chapter on the Missionary Reading Circle. 

After the Waynesboro Congregation was organized, and 
carried with it the Missionary Association, the Antietam 
Congregation formed a Missionary Committee to continue 
missionary activities among her people. They gave programs 
once a year in each section of their territory, and asked that 
missionary sermons be preached, thus continuing the 
missionary spirit. 

They gave to each convert, after baptism, a copy of the 
"New Testament Doctrines ,, by J. H. Moore, until they were 
out of print, and then gave a copy of "Studies in Doctrines 
and Devotions", by the Sunday School Board. 



BACK CREEK CONGREGATION 

The Back Creek Congregation was organized in 1850. 
Previous to its organization it belonged to the Welsh Run con- 
gregation which was organized in 1810. All of this territory 
was formerly a part of the original Antietam congregation 
organized about 1752. 

Among the family names of the charter members of the 
congregation were, Lehman, Brandt, Hoover, Pheil, Etter, 
Kinsey, Keller, Foust. We have no record of the number of 
the charter members. In 1881 the membership of the congre- 
gation was 215. At present, 1941, it is 287. 




Brandt's Church — Back Creek 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 43 

For several years after its organization the congregation 
continued holding services in the homes, some of which were 
built large for that purpose. About 1853 the first church 
house was built on land bought from Elder David Brandt 
whose spacious home had been a regular meeting place for 
worship. The price paid for this tract of land of 57 perches 
was $25. The deed of David Brandt and wife, Elizabeth, was 
made to the German Baptist Church of the Back Creek Con- 
gregation on August 8, 1856, recorded April 1, 1857. (Deed 
book 57, page 564.) In it David Foust, Sr., and Michael 
Hoover were named trustees of the "Back Creek Congrega- 
tion of the German Baptist Brethren Church". 

This church without a basement, 40 feet by 62 feet, which 
was built of native limestone contains an audience room with 
seating capacity of 300, a kitchen and a nursery or Sunday 
school room. The church was originally furnished with back- 
less seats placed lengthwise in the building, with a lengthwise 
center aisle and a long table in front for the ministers. At a 
council meeting on March 26, 1881, David Foust, Sr., and 
Frederick Myers were appointed as a committee to put backs 
on the benches. At a later date the interior of the church was 
remodeled, the pews were placed crosswise, the seats were 
arranged for Love Feast convenience, a pulpit, a delco light 
plant, and a furnace were added. 

In 1935 Sister Elmira (Samuel) Neikirk left $500 to be 
used for Brandt's church. This was used for new pews, a new 
furnace, electric lights and a new pulpit rug. These improve- 
ments were dedicated in December 1935. Brother Daniel 
Bowser of York preached the dedicatory sermon. 

After the loss of all the knives and forks by fire in the 
home of Brother J. K. Brindle, he replaced them with pearl 
handle stainless steel knives and forks. 

On August 15, 1862, Jacob Myers and wife sold to the 
congregation for $61.50 one acre 86 perches of land. It was 
recorded May 3, 1886 in deed book 40, page 622. This was 
bought for a hitching ground. Now it is used for parking cars. 

On May 27, 1871, the congregation purchased for a 
graveyard 14 2/10 perches of land a short distance from the 
church. This land was bought from Adam Pheil and wife, 
Catherine, for the sum of $6.84. It was deeded to the same 
trustees as the church property. Recorded April 17, 1897, 
Book 108, page 431. 

During 1870 and 1871 the second house of worship in 
this congregation, the Upton house, was built near the village 
of Upton, a short distance north of state highway No. 16. It 
was built on a tract of land (1 acre 37 perches) which was 
bought December 23, 1871 from Henry Hawbecker and wife, 
Euhamma, for the sum of $307.81. The Board of Trustees to 
whom the property was deeded, who also constituted the 
building committee were John Widders, David Foust, Sr., and 



44 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Upton Church 



Peter Picking. The deed was recorded April 4, 1874, (Deed 
book 50, page 7). A brick building, 40'x60', was erected 
with stone foundation and basement at an approximate cost 
of $3,000. The bricks were burned on the farm of John 
Widders, about one mile distant. February 10, 1888, to 
enlarge the graveyard, another acre of land was purchased 
from the same farm for $150, Jacob S. Shindle and wife, 
Susan, being owners at that time. The deed was recorded 
May 29, 1888, in Deed book Vol. 81, page 501. At council 
meeting March 1910, the following committee was appointed 
to incorporate the graveyard : F. S. Ebersole, John Lehner, 
Daniel Graybill, John P. Leiter, C. D. Hege. (Charter book 
Vol. 3, page 95.) They became the first Board of Trustees. 

When considering the location for a second house of wor- 
ship in the congregation there had been quite a difference of 
opinion. Elder John Shank who lived in the southern part of 
the congregation offered to give $1,400 if it would be built 
midway between Upton and Greencastle. He was evidently 
disappointed when the site at Upton was chosen. Soon after 
the completion of the building of the Upton church in 1871 he 
set aside from his own farm, 2 miles southwest of Greencastle, 
7 acres 71 perches of land for church and graveyard purposes 
and erected thereon at his own expense an exact duplicate of 
the Upton house. 

In his will written December 30, 1876, probated 
November 23, 1877 (Will book, Volume H, Page 441) he be- 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



45 




Shanks Church — Back Creek 

JL U< l a *onn ^f- to the Back Creek congregation and directed 
that $800 of his estate be used to erect a dwelling house on the 
land for the use of the caretaker of the property. The care- 
taker was to receive the proceeds of all the tillable land and 
pay taxes. The house was erected in 1878. He devised also 
that a dower of $1,000 be left in his "Mansion farm". The 
interest of 6% per annum to be forever used for repairs 
needed to the church house, building and fences. He also 
directed that the burial in the graveyard should be absolutely 




■ 



Home of Elder John Shank 



46 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

free to all humanity regardless of race or condition. Today, 
in 1940, Daniel Haldeman continues to pay interest on the 

dower. 

On the night of May 30, 1883, the church was struck by 
lightning. Bed clothing on the attic became ignited and did 
much damage, ruining the interior of the building but leaving 
the walls intact. The interior arrangement of the church was 
changed when rebuilding. 

Services are now being held at the Shank's church every 
Sunday morning, while at Brandt's and Upton they are held 
every week, alternating Sunday morning and evening. 







Mrs. Mary Catherine Emmert Miller and Granddaughter 
Sister Miller attended Shank's church for almost 50 years. 

Years ago services were held at each of the three places every 
four weeks in the morning. On the fourth Sunday services 
were held at Church Hill School House, Guitners School 
House, and St. John's Lutheran Church in Cashtown. These 
appointments being every 12 weeks. Services were also held 
for a while at Dickey's School House, Centennial School House, 
Pine Grove School House, and Bridgeport. Services at 
Church Hill were discontinued after missionary work was 
begun at Mercersburg, it being but two miles distant. They 
were discontinued at Centennial School House after the organ- 
ization of the church in Chambersburg. They are still held 
at Guitner's School House every six weeks in the morning. 
Because of more convenient modes of travelling, preaching 
services have been discontinued at the other places mentioned 
above. 



Other Missionary Efforts 

MERCERSBURG — At a council meeting on March 26, 
1883, Jacob S. Shindle and Moses Gingrich were appointed as 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



47 



a committee to confer with the Welsh Run congregation about 
buying a church house in Mercersburg. These brethren 
secured an option on the house and deposited $50. For some 
reason the plan failed and the brethren forfeited their deposit 
money. About 1911 a mission was opened in Mercersburg by 
Back Creek and Welsh Run congregations jointly. About 
1918 the boundary line between the two congregations was 
changed so that it is now wholly within the Welsh Run 
congregation. 

EMANUEL'S CHURCH— This was an abandoned United 
Brethren Church five miles northwest of Chambersburg which 
wa3 bought for $248 by M. B. Mentzer and Wm. R. Moore. 

Upon the payment of the purchase 
price they transferred it to the trustees 
of the Ridge and Back Creek congre- 
gations on May 10, 1911. For a time 
services were conducted alternately 
by both congregations. Later the 
Ridge congregation discontinued their 
work and it was cared for by the Back 
Creek Congregation until March 6, 
1931, when the building was sold to 
Samuel Bricker for $208. 

McCONNELLSDALE — In 1894 
Elders Wm. A. Anthony of the Falling 
Spring congregation and J. Kurtz 
Miller of the Back Creek congregation 
opened a mission in Fulton County. 
Until 1900 these two brethren alter- 
nated in preaching there. At the 
council meeting of March 25, 1897, 
action was taken to build a church and 
.. mj _ _ i the following committee was appoint- 

ed to solicit funds: Solomon Sollenberger, George R Deihl 
John H. Foust and David Kinsey. A tract of land was bought 
trom the McGovern farm two miles north of McConnellsburo- 
A frame church house named McConnellsdale was built 
thereon. It was deeded to the German Baptist Brethren 
Church of Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The board of 
trustees were: George Snider, Nathaniel Rotz of Fulton 
County, and David Kinsey of Franklin County. Services were 
held there every four weeks. Brother J. Kurtz Miller reported 
that there were about 40 received into the church by baptism 
George Snider and Nathaniel Rotz were elected deacons. A 
union Sunday school was organized. Annual Love Feasts were 
held in the fall of the year which were attended by many mem- 
bers from Back Creek (30 or 40), and the Pleasant Ridge 
Congregations. In 1923 because of lack of interest services 
were discontinued, the house was sold to G. A. Heckman and 
tiie pulpit and some of the pews were moved to Shank's Church. 




Elder J. Kurtz Miller 



48 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




MCCONNELLSDALE MEETING HOUSE 

Dedicated in 1894- Building Now Reduced. 

Presiding Elders of the congregation: Samuel Lehman, 
who moved to Naperville, 111.; David Brandt, who was a 
German speaker; 1877, John Shank, the builder of the Shank 
church; 1877-1886, Adam Pheil, who later united with the 
First Brethren Church; 1886-1893, David Long, a non-resident 
elder (from Beaver Creek, Md.) ; 1894-1903, Daniel Miller, 
who did not encourage Sunday school work; 1904-1913, John 
Lehner, who was much interested in Sunday school work; 




Elder M. B. Mentzer and Wife 



1913-1924, D. A. Foust, who was a member of the District 
Mission Board; 1924-1940, A. M. Neiswander; 1940-to date, 
M. B. Mentzer. 

Ministers other than presiding elders: J. Eberly Kurtz, 
Enoch Eby, Abraham Pheil, D. P. Miller, John Myers, George 
Hege, Daniel Neikirk, J. D. Wilson, C. H. Steerman, Norman 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



49 




Elder Edgar Landis and Wife 



Dentler, E. J. Egan, J. S. Walleck, Edgar Landis, M. B. 
Mentzer, Geo. Widder, Geo. Mourer, Daniel Young, M. R. 
Flohr, F. E. McCoy, Paul Miller, Harvey Martin, J. Kurtz 
Miller, J. H. Brindle, Edward Wingert. 

Deacons: John Brandt, Michael Hoover, Geo. Brindle, 
Geo. Deihl, David Foust, Sr., Isaac Etter, Solomon 
Sollenberger, Jacob Bovey, John Etter, J. S. Shindle, David 
Hollinger, John Foust, John Wingert, W. E. Harglerode, 
James Blattenberger, L. H. Leiter, Geo. Snyder, Nathaniel 
Rotz, B. F. Branthaver, A. B. 
Kriner, A. C. Foust, W. M. 
Spangler, Wm. Tedrick, G. 
A. Heckman, Geo. Byers, C. 
E. Lensbower, D. M. Halde- 
man, A. E. Hykes, Jacob K. 
Miller, David Heckman, J. 
K. Brindle, Wm. Foust, H. 
A. Etter, D. H. Stouffer, 
Samuel Hawbaker, Clarence 
Over, J. A. Weaver, Nelson 
Wilson, Ira Hawbaker, Paul 
Musselman, Spencer Whit- 
more. Merle Spangler, Jacob 
Oberholtzer. 

Church Secretaries : 
— 1904, Geo. Hege, served 
more than 25 years; 1904- 
1924, F. S. Ebersole; 1924- 
1926, Margaret Oellig; 
1926-1927, Ralph Zimmer- 
man; 1927-1938, Nelson Wil- 
son; 1938 to the present Ezra DAuman and Wife 
time Mildrpd Hppkman Distinguished for Regular 
Lime, iviliarea rieCKman. Attendance at Services. 




50 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder John Lehner and Wife 

Church Treasurers: John F. Etter, Wm. Tedrick, D. A. 
Heckman, Samuel Hawbaker. 



Sunday School 

At the church council of August 29, 1891, the question 
of starting a Sunday school in the congregation was discussed 
and deferred until next meeting. At council March 25, 1892, 

the question of opening a Sun- 
day school at Brandt's Church 
was discussed and the privi- 
lege given to any one who de- 
sired to do so. John H. Foust 
accepted the challenge. Sun- 
day school superintendents ai 
Brandt's Church have been, 
John H. Foust, James Blat- 
tenberger, Andrew Heckman, 
William Foust, Joseph 
Brindle, Harry Etter, Samuel 
Hawbecker— (1939). 

At the council of March 
25, 1893, the question of 
opening a Sunday school at 
Upton house was voted upon 
favorably. There were none 
opposed. 

Sunday school superin- 
tendents at Upton Church 
have been George Hege — 
Elder David A. Foust Assistant, F S. Ebersole ; W. 

Member of Mission Board £. Harglerode, Jacob Miller, 

Many Years. Daniel Mickley, William 




Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 51 

Tedrick, Joseph Wingert, Luther Stouffer, Nelson Wilson, D. H. 
Stouffer, Paul Musselman, Spencer Whitmore, Paul Heckman. 

From the beginning both Brandts and Upton were sum- 
mer schools. Since 1915 they have been evergreen schools. 

First Sunday school was organized at Shank's Congrega- 
tion in the Spring of 1902. This was for the summer only. 
Since 1905 it has been an evergreen school. 

Sunday school superintendents at Shank's Congregation 
have been Andrew Kriner, Luther Leiter, Andrew Kriner, Paul 
Musselman, Jacob Weaver, and Daniel Haldeman. 

The Sister's Sewing Circle, Shanks Church 

Mrs. Sue Pfoutz, of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, met with 
the women of "The German Baptist Brethren Church" of 
Shanks Church in Back Creek Congregation, in the home of 
Frances M. Leiter (Mrs. Luther H.), January 18, 1906, to 
organize a Sewing Circle. The following organization was 
effected: President, Frances M. Leiter; Vice President, Susie 
Wallech (Mrs. John); Secretary, Blanche Wallech; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Fannie Gearhart; Treasurer, Rebecca A. 
Kuhn (Mrs. William). 

Each member gave 5c dues per month. Besides this they 
made and sold articles for household use and clothing. They 
took their sewing home and held their monthly meetings in 
the various homes. 

In 1907 the Circle accepted the invitation of the Presi- 
dent, Frances M. Leiter, to meet regularly in her home as it 
was becoming burdensome to move the sewing on hand from 
one meeting place to another. 

Articles of clothing, food and money were given from 
time to time to the poor of the neighborhood and to the several 
ministers and their wives ; also to several mission points. 

Cocoa matting was laid in the aisles of the church and a 
Bible desk was placed on the long table where the 
ministers sat. 

The Circle continued to meet in the home of L. H. Leiter 
until they moved to Greencastle in 1910. 

In 1911 a call came from two neighboring churches, 
Shady Grove and Brown's Mill, in Falling Spring Congrega- 
tion for help to organize Sewing Circles. The President, 
Frances M. Leiter was appointed to assist them and a Society 
was organized at each place. 

The Shank Circle disbanded in 1912. 



BIG CONEWAGO CONGREGATION 
Divided Into Upper Conewago and Lower Conewago in 1849 

The Big Conewago Congregation was organized in 1741. 
At the time of the organization it was the next to the largest 



52 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

congregation in the brotherhood. It comprised a large terri- 
tory, about East Berlin and York Springs in York and Adams 
Counties. After the Bermudian Seventh Day Baptists 
Brethren ceased to exist as an organization about the year 
1820, the entire northern half of York County also became 
Big Conewago territory. 

The first preacher was George Adam Martin, who was 
born in Germany in 1715, and came to America at an early 
day. He was a member of the Reformed Church under Peter 
Miller in the Tulpenhocken country. He united with the 
Church of the Brethren in 1735 and was ordained by Peter 
Becker in 1739. He lived first in the Coventry Church, later 
in the Conestoga Church. He then moved to the Big 
Conewago Church and became their first elder. 

The account given by Brumbaugh in his History of the 
Brethren of George Adam Martin, states that Martin was a 
rash, impulsive, impatient man. He possessed an unusual 
mind, well trained in German and Latin, was a logical rea- 
soner, a profound speaker, and a ready writer. He did not 
kindly receive admonition, because he declared that every- 
body who knew him considered him z- great Doctor of Holy 
Writ. He argued with his brethren in the Big Conewago 
Church, that needless restrictions were adopted, in that thej^ 
did not allow anyone who was not baptized to partake of the 
Holy Sacraments. The controversy continued in Big Conewago 
Church for some time, until George Adam Martin was 
disowned about 1760. 

In 1770 this congregation contained seventy-seven 
members. Some of the names given by Morgan Edwards were, 
George Brown, preacher; John Heiner, Peter Fox, Anthony 
Dierdorff, John Dierdorff, Nicholas Moyer, Manasseh Brough, 
Michael Bosserman, David Ahrhard, Daniel Baker, Andrew 
Trimmer, Peter Dierdorff, John Neagly, Welty Brissel, 
Lawrence Baker, Nicholas Baker, Jr., Adam Dick, Henry 
Radibush, Jacob Sweigard, Peter Neiper, Joseph Latshaw, 
Abraham Stauffer, Henry Dierdorff, John Burkholder, 
Eustance Rentzel, Barnett Augenbaugh, Michael Brissel, 
Matthias Bowser, Philip Snell, Henry Brissel, George Wagner, 
George Resser, and their wives. The unmarried were : Peter 
Wertz, Ann Mummert, Christian Frey, Samuel Arnold, Mary 
Latshaw, Catherine Stidebaler, Sarah Brissel, Nicholas Baker, 
Marillas Baker, Jacob Brown, and Rudolph Brown. 

As early as 1736, a constituancy of the Cloister at 
Ephrata, Pennsylvania, moved to the Bermudian country. 
This was a section of country along the Bermudian Creek in 
York County, nearly in the center of the Big Conewago 
Church. These Cloister Brethren worshipped with the 
Brethren of Big Conewago Church. Conrad Beissel, founder 
of the Cloister, was noted for his proseliting attitude, and, it 
is presumed, when he heard of the controversy in Big 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 53 

Conewago Church, he organized his Bermudian brethren in a 
Seventh Day Baptist organization in about 1758. (York 
County History.) 

When George Adam Martin was disowned in Big 
Conewago Congregation, he was at a loss to find fellowship. 
He then journeyed to the Cloister at Ephrata in 1762 and be- 
came a disciple of Beissel. John Horn was his associate on 
this visit. Some brethren from the Big Conewago Church 
were opposed to his excommunication, namely : John Sterner, 
Peter and Abraham Knipper, Frederick Furhman, George 
Schleitler, Peter Zug, and a Brother Fink. They were anxious 
to reinstate him. After hearing of his acceptance of the 
Ephrata doctrine they dropped the matter. The Bermudian 
Church was under the control of Beissel and Peter Miller, 
until Beissel sent Rudolph Naelgle and Jacob Gass to the 
Bermudian Church in 1762, and ordered the members to 
receive George Adam Martin as elder and minister. The 
preaching of Martin drew large crowds. This being right ;.n 
the center of Big Conewago Church, he might have won many 
of his former members to the Bermudian Church, but then 
John Mack, son of Alexander Mack, the founder, and a 
Brother Staub went among the members and explained to 
them the error and danger of the new movement. This 
blocked the way somewhat, for George Adam Martin winning 
over to his Bermudian Church members from the Big 
Conewago Church. 

In spite of all their misunderstandings the Bermudian 
Seventh Day Baptist Brethren and the Conewago Brethren 
worshipped together in suitable houses and barns for quite a 
number of years. 

About 1820 the Bermudian Seventh Day Baptist Church 
ceased to exist as an organization, having passed under the 
influence and control of the Brethren. 

After the removal of Martin, elder Daniel Leatherman 
was placed in charge of the Big Conewago Church and on his 
removal to Maryland, Nicholas Martin was elected elder. He 
too moved to Maryland and was succeeded by George Brown, 
grandfather of the late Adam Brown. After the death of 
George Brown, Isaac Latshaw was placed in charge and after 
his death, William Trimmer, who remained elder until the 
congregation was divided in 1849. 

At an election held at the house of Brother John Mummert 
on the 26th day of May A.D. 1847, by the members of the 
Church of Big Conewago in Adams County, to elect a brother 
to the word in said church the following votes were cast : 

For Adam Brown 33 

For Jacob Sower 7 

For Daniel Longenecker 5 

For Joseph Myers 1 



54 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

We the undersigned Brethren do certify that the votes as 
they stand above were given for the above named Brethren, 
and it appears that Adam Brown was elected to the word May 
26 A.D., 1847. The election by us: 

Daniel Foutz William Trimmer 

Samuel Miller Peter Dierdorff 

Andrew Miller Jacob Brown 

Andrew Dierdorff 

Chx^ CcL. 2/C - o/^cy *Z__ ^U^cy ^^J / '8 UY fif ~£uL <-rries>ryr£e<i4 SjC 

/ VoXn LLKUkJL- Ot^w 

^-v, ^4otc^ J*>™^^ sM ;W/ /#/ /W W /7& /// 3 3 

Teller's Sheet — Election 1847 

The Big Conewago Church multiplied in membership, 
and covered such a large scope of country, that a division was 
deemed feasible. 

At a meeting held at Brother Jacob Lerew's in Big 
Conewago Congregation an election was held for a Brother at 
the word, in the presence of us the undersigned Brethren this 
12th day of May A.D., 1849, and at the same time a division 
line in the congregation, beginning at Millers line on Forge 
Road, thence to Kings Tavern, thence to Big Conewago Creek 
at mouth of Beaver Creek, thence on County line to Abner 
Binders, thence York and Adams County line to Cumberland 
County line. 




Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



55 



VOTES IN PRESENCE OF 

Daniel Longenecker 26 Jacob Falkenstine 

Joseph Myers 26 Andrew Dierdorff 

John Mummert 4 Peter Dierdorff 

Samuel Altland 3 William Trimmer 

John Hollmger 2 Adam Brown 

Manuel Gochenour 2 

Samuel Trimmer 1 

Abraham Smith 1 

George Dierdorff 1 

Daniel Dierdorff 1 

The Big Conewago Church was divided at this meeting 
and named Upper Conewago and Lower Conewago, 
respectively. 

At the time of the division of the Big Conewago Church 
in 1849, the following were ministers: William Trimmer, 
Elder in charge; Daniel Longenecker, Andrew Dierdorff, 
Peter Dierdorff, Joseph Myers, Jacob Brown, and Adam 
Brown. 

The preaching services were held in the houses where 
they were large enough, and the Love Feasts and the bread- 
breaking were held in the barns. Services were held in the 
homes of Isaac Latshaw, William Pickings, Peter Dierdorff, 
Jacob P. Lerew, Daniel Trimmer, near Kralltown; Christian 
Raffensberger at Mulberry, and on the Casper Markey farm 
near Mulberry. 

Seven yearly or annual meetings were held within the 
bounds of the Big Conewago Church. See chapter on Annual 
Meetings. 

Tradition says that all the annual meetings held in the 
Big Conewago Congregation were on farms located on the 
banks of Big Conewago Creek, where there was easy access 
to the stream for watering the horses. During the meeting on 
the Peter Dierdorff farm, in 1844, the field west of the build- 
ings, of about 10 or 12 acres was used for the horse pasture 
during the meeting. At this meeting, a horse had a leg broken 
from a kick received from another horse and had to be killed. 

A solicitation was made and another horse purchased 
for the Brother who lived in Maryland or Virginia. 

It was told by an old brother who attended this meeting: 
"Es Feld war foil Ceil," (the field was full of horses). From 
the account given in the Pennsylvania Republican, a York 
County newspaper of 1844, "The weather was fine and the 
crowd large. " 

"The religious sect generally called 'Tunkers', we believe 
held a very large meeting at Peter DierdorfFs, Dover town- 
ship which commenced on Friday and closed on Monday last. 
Members of the Society were present from every part of the 
Union where any of them resided. Religious services were 



56 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

held in Mr. DierdorfFs spacious barn and conducted alter- 
nately in the German and English languages. The occasion 
attracted a very large concourse of people, and we are not 
extravagant when we say that at least two thousand persons 
were present on Sunday last. Every avenue of access to the 
house was crowded with vehicles and horses but many went 

on foot." 

Divided into Upper and Lower Conewago in 1849. See 
history of these two congregations. 



BOILING SPRINGS CONGREGATION 

The church was built in 1875. It is in the territory origin- 
ally known as the Cumberland Congregation which remained 
as such until 1836 when it was divided into two congrega- 




Boiling Springs Church of the Brethren 

tions, known as the Upper and Lower Cumberland. Boiling 
Springs belonged to Lower Cumberland. The Boiling Springs 
Congregation remained with Lower Cumberland until 1934. 
Excerpts from the record of the organization of the 
Boiling Springs Congregation of the Church of the Brethren 
at the home of Brother Frank Carr on October 31, 1934. 
Devotions by Brother Kline ; Scripture, I Timothy 6. Our act- 
ing elder, Brother Frank Lightner, officiated at the election of 
officers as follows: Secretary, Brother Frank Carr; Assistant 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



57 



Secretary, Ida Carr; Treasurer, Brother Charles Trimmer- 
Chorister, Sister Maud Ditmer; Assistant Chorister, Mary 
Hassinger; Auditors, Brother Herman Carr and Brother 
Robert Cocklin. 

The Baker house became the property of Boiling Springs 
Congregation through the separation. This house was razed 
in the summer season of 1935, and the material was used in 




Baker's Church — Lower Cumberland 

the erection of the new addition to Boiling Springs Church 
which was to provide a preparation room for our Love Feast. 
The first Love Feast was held in the Boiling Springs house as 
a separate congregation on the first Sunday in November, 
1935. Brother Otho Hassinger and Brother Robert Cocklin 
were ministers for the Boiling Springs Congregation. 

In 1937 Brother Albert Cook became pastor of the church 
serving under the eldership of Brother J. E. Rowland until 
1940 when Brother Rowland moved to New Paris in central 
Pennsylvania. Elder Henry L. Miller, of Mechanicsburg, 
succeeded Brother Rowland as presiding elder. There are 
thirty-five members. 

The Boiling Springs Congregation did not organize a 
Sunday school until November 22, 1914. There was a meeting 
held after church service for the purpose of organizing a 
Sunday school. Brother Ira Hart officiated. We then pro- 
ceeded to elect officers: Superintendent, Brother Elmer 
Richwine; Assistant, Brother Frank Saphore ; Treasurer, 



58 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Brother George Keeny; Sec- 
retary, Sister Mary Thrush. 

A meeting was called 
at the home of Brother 
Michael Landis on Wednes- 
day evening, November 
25th, 1914, for the purpose 
of setting the hour for our 
Sunday school and make 
some plans for literature. 
The hour was set for 2:15 
P.M. for a few Sundays at 
least, to teach from the 
Bible until the new quarter 
when we would get the 
regular quarterly and have 
school at 9 :30 A.M. There 
were about twenty-five 
members. The school ses- 
sions have been held regular 
until this time. The present 
superintendent is Wesley 
Crusey. 




Pastor J. Albert Cook and Wife 



BUFFALO CONGREGATION 

Wendell Becker, now Baker, imigrator from Pultz, 
Germany, landed at Philadelphia, September 27, 1749. He 
located at Amwell, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. While 
there he united with The Church of the Brethren. In 1772 he, 
with his family, moved into Buffalo Valley. He bought what 
was known as the George Calhoun Tract of Samuel McClay. 
After his death he was buried in a private cemetery on his 
farm, which has since been the burying place of many of his 
decendants. For a number of years Wendell and his wife 
were the only members of the Church of the Brethren in the 

valley. 

John Baker, oldest son of Wendell Baker, a mill-wright 
going from place to place in pursuit of his trade, while at East 
Berlin became acquainted with a widow by the name of 
Horlacher, whose maiden name was Mary Lawshe. They 
were married and for a time lived near the town of East 
Berlin, on the banks of the Conewago. Brother and Sister 
Baker united with the Church of the Brethren. To this union 
was born a daughter, Anna, to whom we shall again call 
attention. Brother Baker's wife died and in course of time he 
married Mary Hollinger and moved to Buffalo Valley. 

In the year 1816 Elder David Shellenberger and David 
Smith, of Lost Creek, Juniata County, held a meeting at the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



59 



home of Brother John Baker and after this these brethren 
and others held meetings at the home of the brethren at various 
intervals. On one of these early visits to Buffalo Valley it is 
said that Elder David Shellenberger crossed Penn's Creek, on 
horse back, when the creek was overflowing its banks. 

The first member baptized in the valley was the wife of 
Jacob Braefogel. Some time later John Eyer united with the 
church. In 1817 Ester Nickel and Mary Hupper joined. Polly 
Peters was baptized, by a minister by the name of Stover, in 
1821. Sister Peters later became the wife of Abraham Slifer. 
In 1822 came Michael Peters, John Keister and wife 
Magdalena Mertz, and Anna (nee Baker) Beaver, already 
mentioned. 

John Royer and wife, Anna, (nee Groff), moved into the 
valley in 1823, locating on a farm near what is now known as 
Vicksburg, southeast of the Buffalo 
Church, about four miles, with him came 
his son, Jacob, married to Susannah (nee 
Moyer) now Myers. The sixth of seven 
children born to this union was John G., 
well known in the Church of the 
Brethren. Jacob and his wife are buried 
in the Buffalo Cemetery. Along with 
them came Isaac Myers, brother of 
Susannah, to whom we shall again refer. 
In 1825 Abraham Slifer, wife and sister 
united with the church. 

In the fall of 1826, under the super- 
vision of Elder David Shellenberger, of 
Lost Creek Congregation, and Elder 
Christian Long, of Huntingdon County, 
the Church of the Brethren was or- 
ganized. The birth of the Buffalo Congre- 
gation took place at the home of John Royer, located as above 
stated, east of the Buffalo Church, at the first Love Feast 
occasion. At this meeting John Royer and David Shellen- 
berger who had recently moved into the congregation were 
elected deacons. The charter members with few exceptions 
were the people mentioned. 

In th spring of 1828 Joel Royer and wife, Susannah, with 
their large family moved into the congregation and in the fall 
of the same year the second Love Feast was held, at the home 
oi Jacob Royer, son of John. At this meeting David Shellen- 
berger was elected to the ministry. The following year an- 
other election occurred and John Royer was called to the 
ministry and his son, Jacob, and Henry Reubsan to the office 

?oo/ aC ? n ' i TheSe brethren labored together until the year 
1834, when by another choice Henry Reubsan was called to 
the ministry and Joel Royer and Isaac Myers, having received 
about the same number of votes, were installed as deacons 




John G. Royer 






150 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 








House Where Buffalo Church Was Organized 



John Lauber, a minister, moved into the congregation during 
the fall of 1835. 

David Shellenberger moved to Ohio in the spring of 1837 
and the following year Henry Reubsan also moved to the same 
state. During a Love Feast held at the home of John Lauber, 
in 1839, Isaac Myers was chosen minister, and John Boganrief 
and Allen Boyer deacons. 

In the year 1840 a minister, John Sprogle, with his family 
moved into the congregation. At this time the ministerium of 
Buffalo Church consisted of John Royer, John Lauber, Isaac 
Myers, and John Sprogle. The deacon body were Jacob 
Royer, John Boganrief and Allen Boyer. These brethren 
labored together for a space of six years. 

John Lauber and Allen Boyer moved to Illinois during 
the spring of 1846 and the same year Charles Royer and John 
Shively were chosen deacons. In the fall of this year John 
Royer died. The official body then consisted of two ministers 
and four deacons. 

In the year 1847 Charles Royer was chosen to the min- 
istry. This was the fifth ministerial election held in the 
Buffalo Congregation and gave the church three ministers and 
four deacons. In this proportion these brethren labored to- 
gether until 1850. About this time there were many accessions 
to the church. 

During the year John Sprogle and Isaac Myers were or- 
dained, Elders John Boganrief was chosen to the ministry and 






Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 61 

Robert Badger and Isaac Royer to the office of deacon. This 
same year Joel Royer and John Shively died. This left the 
church again with three ministers and four deacons. The 
following is an extract from the diary of Elder John Kline : 
"September 28th we got to John Royer's in Union County. On 
Monday, September 30th, a vote of the church was taken and 
Isaac Myers and John Sprogle were ordained to the full work 
of the Gospel Ministry." 

About this time, the official brethren extended their 
activities, usually going on horse back, beyond the mountains 
into the adjoining valleys. Two ministers, or a minister and 
a deacon would fill the appointments every eight, or sixteen 
weeks. This effort was continued for a number of years and 
resulted in the organization of the Sugar Valley Congregation 
June 8, 1880 (see history of Sugar Valley Church of the 
Brethren) with forty members, one minister, and one deacon 
and Elder Isaac Myers of the mother congregation in charge. 



Isaiah Beaver and Wife 

In 1856 Robert Badger was chosen minister and Christian 
Shively deacon. 

June 3rd, 1859, John L. Beaver was elected to the min- 
istry and the following fall Adam Beaver was called to the 
office of deacon. May 30th, 1860, Adam Beaver was chosen 
minister and John G. Royer deacon. In 1863 John G. moved 
to Ohio. June the 18th, of this year, Jacob S. Shively and 
George Myers, son of Isaac Myers, were elected deacons. 
This brought the official number to five ministers and five 
deacons. 

May the 11th and 12th, 1868, the District Meeting for the 
Middle District of Pennsylvania was held in the Buffalo 
Congregation. John Beaver and George Myers represented 
the congregation as delegates. 



62 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 







John L. Beaver and Wife 



In the year 1867 Samuel Longenecker, a minister, moved 
into the valley from Adams County and on October 8th of the 
same year William Moore and Peter H. Beaver were called 
to the office of deacon. 

October 9th, 1868, George Myers was called to the 
ministry. This is the first year that the minutes of the church 
are available. The official body as recorded were Isaac Myers, 
elder; Charles Royer, Samuel Longenecker, John L. Beaver, 
and Adam Beaver, ministers; Jacob Royer, Sr., Isaac Royer, 
Jacob S. Shively, William Moore, Christian M. Shively, George 
Myers, and Peter H. Beaver, deacons. Peter H. Beaver was 
elected secretary. 

In 1869 Jacob Royer, Jr., was elected deacon and William 
Moore moved to Illinois. Jacob Royer, Sr., was excused from 
active service as deacon. The following year Jacob Boop was 
chosen deacon. In 1872 Samuel Longenecker moved to Iowa 
and John Boganrief died. The church now had in active serv- 
ice five ministers and six deacons, with a membership of 
about 200. 

September 23rd, 1874, Charles Royer was ordained elder. 
He lived until 1895, serving the church 48 years as minister, 
21 as elder, 16 of which he was elder in charge. In 1878 
Augustus Pick was elected deacon. The following year 
Peter H. Beaver was called to the ministry. With this elec- 
tion the church had three Beaver brothers in the active min- 
istry, sons of Anna (Baker) Beaver, already mentioned, John, 
Adam, and Peter. We are indebted to Peter Beaver for much 
of the data contained in this article, selected from his contribu- 
tions to the Brethren's Year Books, of 1873 and 1875. During 
the years 1877, 1878, and 1879, Peter H. Beaver edited and 
published a paper which he called "The Little Deacon". The 
mother of the Beaver brothers was present at the first meeting 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 63 

held in 1816 and was one of the charter members. In 1876 
Jacob Royer, Sr., died, having filled the office of deacon for 
53 years. 

In 1879 Elder Isaac Myers died, having served the Buffalo 
Church for a space of four years as deacon and 40 as minister, 
29 of which he was elder in charge. 

During the year 1881 Howard Miller, later editor of the 
Inglenook, a native of Buffalo Valley, who had been teaching 
in Somerset County, where he united with the church and was 
elected to the ministry, returned to his former home and 
handed in his letter of membership, and was granted a letter 
in 1888. 

Christian M. Shively died in 1880. George Myers moved 
to Indiana in 1881. Peter H. Beaver united with the Pro- 
gressive Movement in 1888. Adam Beaver passed beyond in 
1898, having served the church as a minister for 38 years. 
John L. Beaver died in 1901, after 42 years of faithful service 
as minister, 10 of wilich he was elder in charge. 

April 25, 1888, another District 
Meeting was held in the congregation. 
Isaiah Beaver, son of John Beaver, 
was elected deacon in 1880, serving a 
term of nine years, when he was 
called as a minister, laboring in this 
capacity until his death in 1921. 
Simon Showalter was chosen minister 
in 1883 and ten years later was 
Deacon Jacob S. Shively gra nted a letter. John Feese was 
and Wife elected deacon in 1886 and died the 

following year. David Boop was 
called the same year as deacon and to the office as church 
treasurer in 1896, discharging his duties until he affiliated with 
the Old Order Church in 1907. Jacob S. Shively was elected 
church treasurer in 1886 and served for the space of ten years. 
He died in 1912. Jacob Royer, Jr., united with the Old 
Order Brethren in 1884. 

John Krebs, a deacon, held his membership with the 
Buffalo Church from 1888 to 1898, when he was granted a 
letter. The same year Daniel Royer and Josiah Boop were 
elected deacons. Some time later Royer was granted a letter 
and Boop served until he died in 1917. Isaac Heddings was 
chosen deacon in 1890 and served the congregation as Sunday 
school superintendent from 1893 to 1897, when he moved to 
Virginia. At the same election in 1890 David H. Strickler was 
also chosen deacon and the following year was called to the 
ministry, in which capacity he served only for a short time, 
he was church secretary from 1891 to 1910, and served as 
treasurer from 1907 to 1921. Brother Strickler was superin- 
tendent of the Buffalo Sunday School for the years 1892 and 
1893, and again served in this capacity from 1920 to 1923. 




64 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




He has since been retained as an honorary member of the 
Sunday school board. 

The Sunday school activities of the Buffalo Congregation 
date from 1856. "Flashlites from History", by John S. Flory, 
page 158: "The Buffalo Valley church in Pennsylvania 
organized a Sunday school in 1856 in which J. G. Royer was 
one of the teachers. This was a union school and was held in 
a school house." No record of this or other early efforts rela- 
tive to officers and additional teachers is available at this time. 

Henry Royer was chosen 
deacon in 1892 and served in 
this capacity until his death 
in 1900. Samuel S. Starook 
was elected deacon at the 
same time and after four 
years was called to the min- 
istry (at this writing, he is 
the oldest minister in the 
district). Greene Shively, 
son of Jacob S., was called 
to the ministry in 1894 and 
has been in charge of the 
Buffalo Congregation as 
elder since 1906. Drawing 
close to a half century of 
service as a minister, and 35 
years as elder. He served as 
Sunday school superinten- 
dent from 1899 to 1905 and 
from 1914 to 1917. 

David Ely was called to 
the office as deacon in 1896 
and served until his death in 
1912. David Heddings was 
elected deacon and granted a certificate that same year. 
Augustus Nickle was elected church secretary in 1888 and 
served a term of 13 years, and as Sunday school superinten- 
dent for the years 1897 and 1898. Elder Edmund D. Book of 
the Perry Congregation served as elder in charge from 1901 
to 1906. His deep concern for the church was greatly 
appreciated. 

Emaus Royer was elected deacon in 1902 and died in 
1927. Brother Royer served the church as secretary from 
1910 to 1924 and as Sunday school superintendent from 1908 
to 1914. John Royer, son of Emaus, was called to the office 
as deacon in 1906 and the following year was chosen minister. 
He was granted a letter in 1913. John Trutt was chosen 
deacon in 1906 and Elias Trutt, his father, was called to the 
same office a year later and died in 1918. Daniel Boop was 
elected in 1906 and died in 1933. William Boop was chosen 




Minister Samuel S. Starook 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



65 




Elder Mervyn W. Mensch and Wife 

deacon in 1907, and also filled the office of treasurer from 
1928 to 1932. Arthur Boop was chosen deacon in 1908. 

Mervyn W. Mensch was called to the ministry in 1918 
and in 1920 was called by the congregation as pastor. For a 
time he published an interesting church paper called "The 
Buffalo Messenger". At his request the church relieved him 
of this obligation in 1929 and by the order of the church the 
elder in charge assumed this responsibility, continuing to the 
present with Brother Mensch assisting. Brother Mensch was 
ordained May 18, 1933. 

Winey Mensch and Jacob Shively, son of Greene, were 
chosen to the office of deacon in 1918. Brother Mensch served 
as church treasurer from 1921 to 1928 and as Sunday school 
superintendent from 1917 to 1921. Cloyd Mensch was elected 
church secretary in 1924 and served until 1934 and was 
reelected in 1938. Charles H. Keister was elected church 




Elder Greene Shively and Wife, Adda M. Shively 



66 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

treasurer in 1932 and to the office of deacon in 1934. Reno H. 
Hoffman was also called as deacon at the same time and has 
served as Sunday school superintendent since 1932. Sister 
Jane A. Boop was elected church secretary in 1934 and served 
until her death in 1938. 

At the beginning of the year 1941 the official body of the 
Buffalo Church consists of Greene Shively, elder in charge and 
pastor; Elder Mervyn W. Mensch, assistant; David H. Strickler 
and Samuel S. Starook, ministers; John M. Trutt, Arthur E. 
Boop, William M. Boop, Jacob G. Shively, Winey G. Mensch, 
Reno M. Hoffman and Charles H. Keister, deacons; David H. 
Strickler, honorary member of the Sunday school board ; Reno 
M. Hoffman, Sunday school superintendent, and Robert M. 
Wert, assistant. Membership 160. 

Buffalo Church of the Brethren Meeting Houses 

May 21, 1850, the Buffalo Congregation purchased a plot 
of ground for a cemetery, about three miles northwest of 
Lewisburg, from Joel Royer, Jr., for the sum of $50.00. Isaac 
Myers, Adam Royer, and Israel Royer represented the church 
as trustees. 

Some time later the first German Baptist Church (now 
the Church of the Brethren) in the valley was built on land 
adjacent to this cemetery. It is said that on a number of 
occasions, the brethren from the west end of the valley, walked 
a distance of over a score of miles in order to attend services 
at this meeting place. In the passing of the years, conditions 
changed; services were discontinued, and in 1904, the build- 
ing was removed to White Springs, about two miles south from 
where the Buffalo Church is now located. The church was 
rededicated in the fall of the same year, Elder Edmund D. 
Book being the guest speaker. 

At this time a goodly number of the brethren and sisters 
were located in this vicinity. The congregation had reached 
the low tide of 40 members, who concentrated their efforts 
here during the later part of the "horse and buggy days", and 
while the automobile was passing through its experimental 
stage. For a space of sixteen years, during this time the 
church took a forward trend and when t>re automobile became 
the chief agency of transportation, services here were discon- 
tinued and again assumed at the Pike Meeting House, now 
known as the Buffalo Church of the Brethren. This decision 
was passed January 1st, 1920. Here the church has since 
united her efforts. 

During the year 1861 the Brethren built a church in the 
west end of the valley, near Laurelton, known as the Hartley 
House, near an old cemetery. It was built on land owned by 
Brother John Showalter. No deed was granted until 
November 9th, 1882, when it was sold by Brother Showalter 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



67 



to Brethren Adam Musser, John Showalter and Lewis Badger, 
trustees of the church, for $1.00. 

During the beginning of the Civil War the meetings here 
were well attended, but as the spirit of seventy-six revived and 
the brethren continued to preach the principles of peace, the 
community interest abated. 

The brethren still continued holding their Love Feasts in 
houses and barns. Realizing the need of a meeting place cen- 
trally located, capable of accommodating its growing member- 
ship and equipped for the purpose of observing the ordinances, 




Buffalo Church in 1864 — Present Meeting Place 



the Buffalo Church of the Brethren was erected in 1864, one 
and a half miles west of Miffiinburg, along the State Highway 
Number 45, then known as the Erie Pike. 

On May 21, 1864, the ground was purchased from Mr. 
Samuel B. Barber, by Jacob Royer, Sr., and Isaac Royer, 
deacons, representing the church. Brother Jacob Strickler, 
Jr., being the architect and builder, assisted by Brother Jacob 
Boop and other brethren and friends. This meeting place 
soon absorbed the interest at Kelly and Hartly meeting places. 
The Kelly House was moved to White Springs and the Hartly 
House was sold at public sale in 1926. The proceeds were 
used toward repair of the Buffalo Church, rededicated during 
the fall of the same year. 

During the year 1881 and 1882 Brother Howard Miller 
compiled a small volume known as the "RECORD OF THE 



68 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

FAITHFUL", containing 99 pages. This was among the first 
efforts to group the Brethren Ministerium by congregations, 
noting time of organization, number of charter members, 
present membership, time the first house was built, and 
number of additional houses then in the congregation. 

The Sisters Aid was organized, at the home of Sister 
M. Catherine Shively, March 1, 1933. The following officers 
were elected: Sisters M. Catherine Shively, President; Roda 
A. Wert, Secretary; and Mary S. Wert, Treasurer. Twelve 
members were present at the meeting. Twenty-nine sisters 
constitute the present membership. Officers: Mary A. Wert, 
President; Ada V. Mensch, Secretary; and M. Catherine 
Shively, Treasurer. They aim to meet monthly. The society 
has rendered a creditable service to the church with 
contributions made possible through their various activities. 

Elders Ordained 

John Royer 

Isaac Myers 1850 

' John Sprogle 1850 

Charles Royer 1874 

John Beaver 1891 

Greene Shively 1906 

Mervyn Mensch 1933 

Ministers Elected 

David Shellenberger 1826 

John Royer 1829 

Henry Reubsan 1834 

Isaac Myers 1839 

*John Sprogle 1840 

Charles Royer 1847 

John Boganrief 1850 

Robert Badger 1856 

John Beaver 1859 

Adam Beaver 1860 

*Samuel Longenecker 1868 

George Myers 1868 

Peter Beaver 1879 

Isaiah Beaver 1889 

♦Howard Miller 1881 

Simon Shoewalter 1883 

David Strickler 1891 

Greene Shively 1894 

Samuel Starook 1896 

John Royer 1907 

Mervyn Mensch 1918 



w 



> 

o 

a 

x 

so 
o 

X 

a 

JO 

o 
d 
►o 



CD 




70 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Elected Sunday School Superintendents 

David Strickler 1892-1893 

1920-1932 

Isaac Heddings 1893-1897 

Augustus Nickel 1897-1899 

Greene Shively 1899-1906 

1914-1917 

Augustus Pick 1906-1908 

Emaus Royer 1908-1914 

Winey Mensch 1917-1921 

Reno Hoffman 1932- 

Number of members is 161. 
* Indicates moved into the congregation an official. 



CARLISLE CONGREGATION 

The history of the Carlisle church began on the last 
Sunday of October in 1907. The work was supervised alter- 
nately by the Upper and Lower Cumberland Congrega- 
tions ; Carlisle being in the center of these two points. Elder 
John A. Miller, of Oakville, Pennsylvania, preached the first 
sermon at a meeting which was held in Clark Newsbaum's 
Hall on South Hanover Street. Meetings were held at this 
location for a few months, and then moved to Sipe's Hall on 
North Hanover Street; later moved to Cochran and Alcock's 
Hall on South Hanover Street. Here the meetings were held 
until the building of the present church house at West and 
Walnut Streets. The Mission Board of Southern Pennsylvania 
assisted in the work and finally effected an organization. 
Elder Joseph A. Long, of York, Pennsylvania, was then 
chairman of the Mission Board. 

On August 31, 1913, Brother Long called a special meet- 
ing for the purpose of getting an organization started, and 
also to consider the building of a church house. The matter 
was then placed in the hands of the District Mission Board, 
and a tentative organization was effected by electing Abram 
S. Hershey, Secretary; E. W. Roth, Treasurer. During the 
joint program the funds were handled by Joseph N. Shatto. 
At this time a committee was also appointed to conduct 
Christian Workers meetings. 

January 5, 1914, another special council was called at 
which time the congregation was organized as the Carlisle 
First Church of the Brethren. At this meeting Elder Joseph 
A. Long was elected elder in charge, and the Mission Board 
to retain direction and supervision. It was decided by a large 
majority vote that plans continue for the building of a church. 
A committee of finance was appointed as follows : Joseph N. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



71 



Shatto, J. E. Faulkner and Isabelle Sheaffer. There were 
about 46 members living within the bounds of the Carlisle 
church at this time. Brother J. E. Trimmer was the only 
resident minister. 

Progress on building a church house began and moved 
along rapidly through the local solicitors and the help of the 
District Mission Board. Their hopes were realized on 
September 6, 1914, when the new church and Sunday school 
rooms were dedicated. Elder I. N. H. Beam, of Virginia, 
preached the dedicatory sermon. The first Love Feast was 
held December 13, 1914, Elder Joseph A. Long officiating. 





Carlisle Church and Parsonage 



The territorial lines were designated as three miles surround- 
ing Carlisle from the court house. The church at once became 
self-supporting, so far as current finances were concerned. 
The cost of the building was met by local contributions and 
also by the help of the District Mission Board. "The North 
American", of Philadelphia, issued an account of the dedica- 
tion on September 11, 1914, which said, "The church cost 
approximately $10, 000.00. " This was probably too high, the 
total cost being between $8,000.00 and $10,000.00. 

Elder Joseph A. Long was in charge from the time of 
organization until his death December 10, 1923. At the 
following council meeting Elder J. E, Trimmer was elected 
elder and served in this capacity until July 16, 1931. The 
District Ministerial Board had charge of the eldership from 



72 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




July, 1931 to January, 1933, having appointed Elder C. B. 
Sollenberger to have oversight as the resident elder. Brother 
Sollenberger was elected to the ministry May 16, 1920, having 
served the church in connection with teaching school. During 
a period of 1931 to 1937 he served the Newville church as 
pastor and elder. In 1931 he was elected by the District 
Conference budget field man, continuing to the present. 

Elder H. M. Snavely 
moved to Carlisle in the fall ^ggg^g/g g^i^ji^^ ^^^ 
of 1931 to the pastorate, and 
was elected elder in charge 
January, 1933, continuing in 
that office to the present. 

Several ministers have 
served the congregation in 
the free ministry of which 
there is record of the follow- 
ing : from Lower Cumber- 
land, Henry Beelman, Wil- 
liam Murphy (who later 
brought his membership to 
Carlisle, April 17, 1922), 
Jacob Miller, Levi Mohler, 
Walter Cocklin, and Jacob 
E. Trimmer; from Upper 
Cumberland, John A. Miller. 
S. M. Stauffer, Noah Cock- 
ley, John A. Garns, Albert 
A. Evans, and William 
Sheaffer; from Carlisle, 
Jacob E. Trimmer, Albert 
Hollinger, William Miller, 

Harry Brindle, C. B. Sollenberger, B. F. Kline, and William 
Burkholder. 

At the suggestion of Brother J. A. Long, who was then 
elder in charge, the church began to look toward having a 
pastor. A committee was appointed and in the course of a 
few years things took shape for supplying pastoral care of 
the church. Elder S. M. Stauffer was secured as the first 
pastor, and served from April 1, 1918 to April 1, 1919. Elder 
Trostle P. Dick served as pastor from October 1921 to April 
1923. Elder D. E. Miller served the church from April 1, 1925 
to September 1928. The church was then without a resident 
pastor until December 1, 1931, when Elder H. M. Snavely took 
up the work, continuing to the present. Brother Snavely was 
elected to the ministry December 22, 1923, at Hershey, 
Pennsylvania, and ordained to the eldership at Myersville, 
Maryland, August 23, 1931. 

Elder J. E, Trimmer lived in the congregation before the 
organization in 1914, having been elected to the ministry in 




Elder H. M. Snavely, Pastor 







T3 

c 

ft 

o 

M 

ft 



C 
CO 



ft 

5 

o ir 

« «S 

H^ M"H 

K £ 

£ S 2 

< ft ^ 

£> Ha *-" 

^ S.2 

O >— ' •!— I 
^ Wg 

^ •- .. 

H S SP 

a ^ 

ft <D 

ft A 

bJO 
ft 

ft i-rt 

ft* o 

d S 

a; s: 

T3 






ft 



H 
»S 

^ •• 

"CJS 

O ft 
-M 0) 

0) 

Pi 



74 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Lower Cumberland, Mohlers church. He was ordained in 
Carlisle during 1920. Elder C. B. Sollenberger is the only 
minister elected by the Carlisle Congregation, May 16, 1920, 
and was ordained to the eldership April 6, 1931. Elder 
William Murphy lived in the congregation from April 17, 
1922, to his passing from this life January 16, 1937. He was 
81 years of age. The present ministers are Brethren J. E. 
Trimmer, C. B. Sollenberger, H. M. Snavely, and William 
Burkholder who was elected at Upper Cumberland August 14, 
1909, and was received at Carlisle, October 19, 1932. 

There were two deacons elected by the congregation, 
J. E. Faulkner and Lewis Hull, April 9, 1914. Sister Hull, who 
was active in the Ladies' Aid Society, and other work, passed 
from this life February 21, 1937. E. W. Roth, elected a deacon 
in the Perry Congregation in the fall of 1908, moved to Carlisle 
before the church was organized. Joseph N. Shatto, elected 
a deacon in Lower Cumberland in the fall of 1895, lived in 
Carlisle before the organization of the church. F. W. 
Boldosser, elected a deacon April 5, 1924, at Huntsdale, and 
his wife transferred their letters to Carlisle January 4, 1932. 
On July 10, 1932, C. S. Cohick and wife were received in 
Carlisle from Newville where they had served in the deacon's 
office since August 5, 1915. Edgar G. Lehman, elected a 
deacon April 7, 1923, in Newville, and his wife were received 
in Carlisle on April 5, 1937. Orville Peiper, elected a deacon 
April 7, 1923, in Newville, and his wife were received in 
Carlisle October 4, 1937. On December 5, 1937, Galen Brindle 
and wife were received from the Marsh Creek Congregation 
where they had served in the deacon's office since June 1, 
1930. Charles W. Trimmer and wife, elected to the deacon's 
office in Lower Cumberland Congregation, Baker House, 
October, 1926, were received from the Boiling Springs 
Congregation on October 29, 1939. 

The church has made steady progress. Some of the out- 
standing features are indicated below. Barbara Roth in her 
will bequeathed $1,000.00 to the church for a parsonage fund. 
This was put on interest and with some added contributions 
in 1932 had reached the amount of $2,000.00. The need of a 
parsonage was apparent to all, and on October 3, 1932, the 
pastor and family moved into a modern and well constructed 
brick house joining the church. In the spring of 1933 the 
interior of the church was refinished. The Ladies' Aid Society 
paid for this from their earnings. A baptistry was installed 
and first used in February, 1937. Many things which con- 
tribute to the upkeep of the church have been supplied by 
various classes of the Sunday school and auxiliary organiza- 
tions. It should also be added that the Aid Society has made 
large contributions to the parsonage fund. 

It should be mentioned in relation to the debt on the par- 
sonage, that Mrs. Katie Zimmerman, daughter of Sadie 




CO 



Q 
< 

o 
< 

Q 



H 






76 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Richter who was a member when the church was organized, 
gave an annuity bond for $1,000.00 to the building of the par- 
sonage in memory of her mother. Barbara Shenk remem- 
bered the church in her will to the amount of $500.00 in 
memory of herself and husband, D. W. Shenk. 

The congregation was mission minded from the begin- 
ning, having supported the cause of missions in various ways. 
At times as much as $500.00 a year was given by the 
congregation. During the past year monthly offerings were 
taken for Brethren Service, Relief and Peace. The Sunday 
school has had a part in missionary and local projects. The 
present enrollment is 200. 

The history would not be complete without mentioning 
the Sisters Aid Society which was organized April 6, 1914, 
with an enrollment of 13 members. Sister Catherine Garland 
was the first president; Sister Lizzie Trimmer, wife of Elder 
J. E. Trimmer, vice president; Sister Bertha Homer, secretary; 
and Sister Isabelle Sheaffer, treasurer. Sister Sheaffer was 
active until a few years ago. She is now in her ninetieth year. 
Sister Lizzie Trimmer was the second president, and held that 
office until her decease, September 25, 1933. Since that time 
Sister Blanche Snavely has been president, and Sister Elizabeth 
Adams, secretary-treasurer. Through the years the society 
has done much in supplying needed equipment for the church 
and church school. They have furnished most of the equip- 
ment for Love Feast, and also given large sums to the Women's 
Work projects for missions. The refinishing of the interior of 
the church in 1933 cost over $400.00, which was paid by the 
society. 

District meeting was held here in October, 1931, and the 
ministerial and Sunday school meetings were held here in 
August, 1937. 

The church membership is 198. 



CHAMBERSBURG CONGREGATION 

The work in Chambersburg was begun by the District 
Mission Board of Southern Pennsylvania. The first effort was 
made in 1905. After a little over a year the work was 
dropped. In September of 1907 the board asked Brother 
William Anthony, of Shady Grove, to visit Chambersburg with 
a view of determining the possibilities of a mission in the town. 
In November, 1907, the board made request of the three con- 
gregations which centered in the town, Falling Spring, Back 
Creek, and Ridge, for the privilege of working the town as 
their discretion might dictate. 

The present house of worship was erected in 1908 at a 
cost of $4,637.48. The dedicatory sermon was preached by 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



77 




Chambersburg Church 




Auditorium, Chambersburg Church 



78 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Brother A. L. B. Martin November 29, 1908. Previous to the 
erection of the church building, services were held in the home 
of Brother Jacob Keller in East Washington Street. The con- 
gregation was organized in June, 1910, and was duly accepted 
by District Meeting after which the Mission Board ceased to 
have the oversight. Brother W. A. Anthony was the first pro- 
siding elder. The membership numbered fifty-one at the time 
of organization. 

The family names included the following: Lehman, 
Trimmer, Keller, Brumbaugh, Trout, Zug, Forney, Crusey, 
Stamey, Lightner, Hicks, Bear, College, Carr, Schuckman, 
White, Kriner, Ashway, Ward, Bittinger, Kittinger, Flohr, 
Kennedy, Kinzer, Shetter, Byers, Wyble, McCoy, Brown. 

The following ministers were elected and installed in the 
Chambersburg Congregation: F. E. McCoy in 1910, and Adam 
E. Forney June 8th, 1912. 

The following elders have had the oversight of the con- 
gregation at various times : W. A. Anthony, Peter S. Lehman, 




Ralph G. Rarick, Pastor, and Wife 



C. H. Steerman, G. S. Batzel, S. D. Hartranft, B. F. Lightner, 
C. E. Grapes and M. B. Mentzer. The following ministers have 
served the congregation as pastor: C. H. Steerman, G. S. 
Batzel, Calvert N. Ellis, Samuel D. Lindsay, A. L. B. Martin and 
C. E. Grapes. Ralph G. Rarick became pastor June 1, 1941. 

Two of the charter members were deacons — Brother 
Milton Brumbaugh and George Byers. The church at different 
times elected the following deacons : William Monn, Jessie 
Berger, Samuel Keefer, Brother Eshelman, J. J. Kriner, John 
Lehman, and Frank K. Sellers, all deceased. 

The present deacon board consists of the following: 
Blaine Bear, John W. Crusey, G. A. W. Stouffer, E. D. Hock, 
Bruch Bard, F. A. Witter, Abram I. Burkholder, C. Lehman 
Wenger, and D. Carl Stouffer. 




SJ ?h j3 

-+-> o> o 

^^ . 

*H £ c 

2^ -. 



0>C0 

N 



P 
W 

w 

CO 

< 



s 

O 

pq 

< 

fa 
O 



O 

xn 



73 

o 

be 

C 



s 

o 

o 






a> 



s 



£o£ 



o 



• 9\ 


w 


+J 


?H 




s 


73 






c 


C 


H 


•l-H 


T3 


a> 


c 


p, o 


J3 






Tfl 



aS 

3 
Fh 

pq 



o 

•I— I 



PQ 



o 
o 

o 



B 

as 



OS 

CD 






CO 



X3 

as 



c 
FH 



13 

as 



M 



03 CO 

c 



o 



5S 



GO 



O 



£Q 



'a; 
CO 



T3 
aS 

pq 

w 



pq£ 






~£ 



•pi Fi o 
^ as aS 
a; 



oK 






«M 



CJ 



it 



S"Sw 



fn as -g 

• '- , ?-h M 



Ess 

sis 



80 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Parsonage, Chambersburg Church 



The Sunday school was organized in the home of Brother 
Jacob Keller in East Washington Street March 1st, 1908. 
Brother Emory P. Trimmer, of York, who was at that time 
residing in Chambersburg, was instrumental in organizing the 
Sunday school and was the first superintendent. Brother 
G. A. W. Stouffer is the present superintendent. The Aid 
Society dates back to the early days of the congregation and 
is still active. 

Some minor remodeling has been done at various times 
to the church building. The basement is now fairly well 
equipped for Sunday school classes and social events. Proceed- 
ings are now in our program to incorporate the congregation. 
The Mission Board in 1936 turned over to the congregation 
the legal title to the church property located in South Fourth 
Street. April 1, 1938, the congregation purchased the double 
dwelling and lot adjoining the church on the corner of Fourth 
and Liberty Streets. The same year a new front was built to 
the church which also connected the dwelling and the church. 
The dwelling was renovated and painted. Three rooms are 
used for Sunday school classes, young people's meetings, and 
the Ladies' Aid Society. The second floor of the north side is 
converted into an apartment for the use of the sexton. The 
entire dwelling on the Liberty Street side is arranged for the 
parsonage. 

The present membership is listed at two hundred and 
fifty-three (253). 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



81 




Salem Meeting House — Chambersburg Church 

The Chambersburg Congregation now has the ownership 
and control of the Salem church and burying ground which 
was formerly a part of the Ridge Congregation. 



CODORUS CONGREGATION 



The Codorus Congregation was organized in the town- 
ship of Codorus, eleven miles southeast of York, in 1758. 
Prominent among the members to organize the Codorus 
Church were Rudy Yunt, Peter Brillhart, John Brillhart, 
Henry Neff and wife. The first elder of this church was Jacob 
Danner, a son of Michael Danner who was a prominent man in 
the early history of the county and one of the five commis- 
sioners appointed to view and lay off York County in 1749. 
Jacob Danner, Henry Danner and their father, were among 
the most intelligent of the first German emigrants, west of the 
Susquehanna River. After Jacob Danner moved to Frederick 
County, Maryland, Henry Neff was called to the ministry and 
remained in charge until after 1775. Some of the other 
members of this church before 1770, were as follows: Jacob 
Tilman, wife and daughter; Jacob Spitler, wife and two 
daughters ; Jacob Neiswanger and wife ; Anna A. Neiswanger, 
Elizabeth (Seip) Sipe, George Beary and wife, John Harold 
and wife, William Spitler and wife, Christian Eby, Wendell 



82 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Baker and wife, Michael Berkey and wife, George Etter and 
son, Mathias Sitler and wife, Susanna Weltner, Catharine 
Brightley. 

These brethren held their first meetings of worship in the 
homes of the brethren. It is supposed the first meeting was 
held at the home of Brother Christian Eby, later John Eby 
now the Keeney home near Shrewsburg. As the membership 
grew, more houses were built for holding meetings. They 
built their new houses with partitions that could be removed 








5*q 


% 




i 


L i 







Keeney Homestead 

Present residence of Brother Emanuel Keeney. Services were held here 

before any of Codorus houses were built. 



e 



and the entire first floor thrown open in one room, leaving only 
the posts that held the buildings. Some of the homes wher 
meetings were held regularly, until the East Codorus Church 
House was built in A.D. 1872, are as follows: John Keeney, 
near Shrewsbury, Pennsylvania ; Jacob Falkenstein, Glad- 
felters Station, Pennsylvania ; Isaac Myers, near Loganville, 
Pennsylvania ; Joseph Y. Myers, east of Loganville ; Samuel 
Bowser, near New Freedom, Pennsylvania; Charles Small, 
near Shrewsbury, Pennsylvania; Thomas Gray, southeast of 
York ; Martin Feigley, near Loganville ; John Keeney, 
Loganville ; Jacob Brillhart, near Loganville ; Jacob Aldinger, 
Brillhart Station ; Isaac Fitz, east of York ; Joseph Marks, 
southeast of York ; George Ness, near Loganville ; Jacob 
Myers, south of Loganville along the Susquehanna Trail. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



83 




Original Joseph Y. Myers Home 

Present residence of Elder and Mrs. S. B. Myers. 
Services were held in this house. 



In the latter part of the Eighteenth Century a number of 
families — (Brethren) Andrew Myers and family, John Eby 
and family, Samuel Yunt and family, Daniel Yunt and family, 
and others by the name of Bowser, Souder, Shamberger, 
Feigley, Marks, Falkenstein, Keeney and others — settled in 
the Codorus area. Among them were brethren as preachers, 
Andrew Myers and John Eby. Martin Feigley was a deacon. 
These brethren labored and worshipped together in union of 
the Spirit and by the Grace of God increased in number. 

1815 — In May, 1815, the 10th day, the first election on 
record was held for a deacon, and the lot fell on Jacob 
Falkenstein. Ministers in 1815 were Elder Andrew Myers, 
and John Eby; deacons were Martin Feigley, and Jacob 
Falkenstein. 

1822 — In the spring of 1822, Deacon Martin Feigley died 
and in the same year, August, 1822, an election was held for 
a preacher and also deacons. The lot fell on Jacob 
Falkenstein for minister. Jacob Myers, Isaac Krous and 
Henry Keeney had the highest number of votes for deacons. 
It is supposed by this time, Brother Eby died, about 62 years 
of age. Now by this time Brother Michael Petry was added 
to the ministry by election or by moving into the district. 

1833 — On November 20, 1833, Andrew Myers died, aged 
80 years and five months. In the meantime, Brother Jacob 




K 

CQ 

C4 
O 
Q 
O 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 85 

Myers was elected to the ministry, and Isaac Krouse either 
died or moved away. There is no record of him further. 
This makes the official brethren as follows : Ministers, Elder 
Jacob Falkenstein, Michael Petry, and Jacob Myers ; deacons, 
Henry Keeney. 

1840— On the 28th day of March, 1840, Michael Petry 
moved away and on the 8th day of October, 1840, an election 
was held for a minister and the lot fell upon Brother John 
Keeney. At the same time, a deacon was elected. The lot fell 
upon Brother George Ness. Official brethren were as follows : 
minsters, Elder Jacob Falkenstein, Jacob Myers, and John 
Keeney; deacons, Henry Keeney, and George Ness. 

1849 — November 12, 1849, Jacob Myers died, aged 66 
years, 11 months, and five days. 

1850 — May 19, 1850, an election was held at the home 
of Brother Jacob Falkenstein for a preacher and the lot fell 
upon Isaac Myers. On the same day, Brother John Keeney 
was advanced to the second degree ministry. 

1853 — May 21, 1853, an election was held for a deacon. 
The lot fell upon Jacob Myers. Ministers in 1853 were Elder 
Jacob Falkenstein, John Keeney, and Isaac Myers; deacons 
were Henry Keeney, George Ness, and Jacob Y. Myers. 

1857 — June 5th, 1857, Brother John Keeney was made 
an elder. On the same day an election was held for a preacher 
of the word and the lot fell upon Jacob Shamberger. On May 
21st, 1859, Elder Jacob Falkenstein died, aged 83 years, eight 
months, and six days. June 4, 1860, an election was held at 
the home of Brother Henry Keeney for a preacher of the word. 
The lot fell upon Brother Thomas Gray. 

1862 — March 1, 1862, Deacon Henry Keeney died, aged 
62 years and four months. On the 8th day of June, 1862, an- 
other election was held for a preacher of the word. The lot 
fell upon David Falkenstein. Brother Andrew Myers, Jr., was 
elected to the deacon's office. Brother Isaac Myers was 
ordained to the eldership on the same day. Ministers in 1862 
were Elder John Keeney, Isaac Myers, Jacob Shamberger, 
Thomas Gray, and David Falkenstein; deacons were George 
Ness, Jacob Y. Myers, and Andrew Myers. 

1836 — So the board of the official brethren stood for 
about four years, when Brother David Falkenstein died on 
the 13th day of April, 1866, aged 49 years, eight months, and 
six days. June 4, 1866, an election was held at the home of 
Brother Samuel Bowser for a preacher of the word. The lot 
fell upon Christian Ness and he was installed in the usual 
manner. 

1867 — June 1, 1867, an election was held for two deacons. 
The choice of the brethren was Martin Feigley and John 
Godfrey. They were installed as deacons. In July, 1867, the 
24th day, Elder John Keeney died, aged 71 years, three 
months, and one day. 



86 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder Jacob Shamberger 



1868— June 7, 1868, 
another election was held at 
the home of Jacob Y. Myers, 
at a Love Feast, for a 
speaker of the word. The 
lot fell upon Andrew Myers, 
Jr., making a change again. 
Ministers in 1868 were Elder 
Isaac Myers, Jacob Sham- 
berger, Thomas Gray, Chris- 
tian Ness, and Andrew 
Myers ; deacons were George 
Ness, Jacob Y. Myers, Mar- 
tin Feigley, and John God- 
frey. September 14, 1868, 
Elder Isaac Myers died, 
aged 59 years, five months, 
and five days. 

1869 — On May 16, 
1869, Jacob Shamberger was 
ordained Bishop of the 
Codorus Congregation. 

1874— On July 16th, 

1874, Jacob Y. Myers died 

(one of the deacons), aged 61 years, six months, and 13 days. 

Brethren Emanuel Myers and Solomon Keeney were elected 

deacons. 

1877 — October 26, 1877, Thomas Gray died, aged 59 
years, four months, and 21 days. 

1878 — On the 6th day of June, 1878, an election was held 
for a minister of the Gospel and the choice fell upon Jacob 
Aldinger and he was installed. This makes a change again. 
Ministers in 1878 were Elder Jacob Shamberger, Christian 
Ness, Andrew Myers, and Jacob Aldinger; deacons were 
George Ness, Martin Feigley, John Godfrey, Emanuel Myers, 
and Solomon Keeney. November 28, 1878, Deacon George 
Ness died, aged 76 years, six months and 10 days. 

1879 — February 1, 1879, Deacon Martin Feigley died, 
aged 47 years, one month and 27 days. June 5, 1879, an elec- 
tion was held at the East Codorus House for two deacons. 
The choice fell upon Jacob Myers and Samuel Y. Keeney. 

1880 — April 17, 1880, an election was held for a treas- 
urer and secretary, of the congregation. Emanuel Myers was 
elected treasurer and Jacob Aldinger first secretary. An elec- 
tion was held for the naming of delegates to the District 
Meeting. Delegates to represent at Woodbury Church, 
Bedford County, Pennsylvania, on the 26th day of April, were 
Christian Ness and Andrew Myers. 

1881 — April, 1881, Deacon Solomon Keeney moved to 
the Upper Conewago Congregation. May 17th delegates 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 87 

from the Codorus Congregation attended District Meeting 
held in the Lower Conewago Congregation, namely Jacob 
Shamberger and Jacob Aldinger. On the 3rd day of June, 
1881, Jacob Aldinger was advanced from the first degree to 
the second degree in the ministry. At the same time an elec- 
tion was held for two deacons. David Markey and Emanuel 
Lehman were elected according to the order of the Brethren. 

1882 — May 6th, 1882, an election for delegates to Confer- 
ence of the Middle District was held. Brethren Christian Ness 
and Jacob Aldinger were elected to represent the Codorus 
Congregation. District Meeting was held at Hopewell 
Church, Bedford County. 

1883 — April 14, 1883, council meeting was held at the 
home of Sister Catharine Myers. A motion to build two new 
meeting houses was made. One at York, Pennsylvania, and 
the other one at New Freedom, York County, Pennsylvania. 
An election for delegates to Conference of Middle Pennsyl- 
vania District was held. Brethren Jacob Shamberger and 
Andrew Myers were elected. 

1884 — May 3rd, 1884, the yearly council meeting was 
held at the home of Brother Christian Ness. David Brillhart 
was elected grave yard director. No delegates to District 
Meeting held in Lost Creek Congregation. 

1886 — May 11th, 1886, Deacon John Godfrey died, aged 
68 years, six months and 12 days. In 1886 David Y. Brillhart 
was elected to the ministry. Ministers in 1886 were Elder 
Jacob Shamberger, Christian Ness, Andrew Myers, Jacob 
Aldinger, David Y. Brillhart; deacons were Emanuel Myers, 
Jacob M. Myers, Samuel Y. Keeney, David Markey, and 
Emanuel Lehman. 

1890 — In 1890 an election was held and Jacob M. Myers 
was chosen by the brethren as a minister of the Gospel. 



Elder Jacob M. Myers and Wife 



88 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

1892 — January 12, 1892, a quarterly council meeting 
was held at the East Codorus House and an election was held 
for deacons. The choice was — Brother George Ness, Samuel 
B. Myers, and Noah Ness. They were installed in office in the 
usual order by Brother Jacob Hollinger, of Cumberland 
County. July 23, 1892, a council meeting was held at the 
York House and Christian Ness was ordained elder by 
Brethren Jacob F. Oiler, of Waynesboro, and Jacob Hollinger, 
of Cumberland County. At the same time two deacons were 
elected. The choice of the church fell upon Adam Ness and 
Michael Brown, who were installed by Brother Oiler, of 
Waynesboro. 

1894 — June the 13th, 1894, Elder Jacob Shamberger 
died, aged 75 years, two months and three days. 

1895 — July 20th, the congregation held a council meet- 
ing at the York church house. The subject of dividing our 
church district was discussed and finally, by a vote, it was 
divided and the York Mission became an organized and sepa- 
rate congregation, retaining Elder Christian Ness as overseer, 
until August 24th, the same year, when S. R. Zug, of Master- 
sonville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, was elected elder in 
charge. Ministers were Jacob Aldinger, Joseph Long, Caleb 
Carrell ; deacons were Elias Hollinger, Adam Ness, and 
Michael Brown. This dividing took away over a hundred of 
the members and made a great change in the official board 
of the Mother Church. 

1895 — October 27, 1895, Deacon Brother Emanuel Myers 
died in the Codorus church house while reading the Scripture. 

1896 — May 26-27, 1896, a Love Feast was held at the 
East Codorus church house, and an election was held for a 
speaker. The choice fell upon Brother Samuel B. Myers and 
he was installed in the usual order. George Ness was 
appointed treasurer of the Codorus church. Ministers were 
Elder Christian Ness, Andrew Myers, David Y. Brillhart, 
Jacob M. Myers, and Samuel B. Myers ; deacons were Samuel 
Y. Keeney, David Markey, Emanuel Lehman and George Ness. 

1897 — May 13-14, 1897, a Love Feast was held at the 
East Codorus house and an election was held for two deacons. 
The lot fell upon Jacob Myers and Milton Lehman. They 
were duly installed as deacons. 

1900 — September 20, 1900, a council meeting was held 
at the East Codorus house and David Y. Brillhart was ordained 
elder of the Codorus Congregation and installed by Brethren 
Jacob Hollinger and C. L. Pfoutz. 

1901 — May 22nd, 1901, at a Love Feast in the Codorus 
Church, the brethren held an election for a minister of the 
Gospel and the choice fell upon John Keller. He was installed 
by Brother John Utz in the usual order. 

1902 — May 15, 1902, an election was held in the Codorus 
Church for a minister of the Gospel, at Love Feast time. The 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 89 



Elder D. Y. Brillhart and Wife 

lot fell upon Israel Bowser. He was installed by E, S. Miller. 
Samuel B. Myers was advanced in the second degree of the 
ministry. 

1903 and 1904 — No minutes. 

1905— Elder D. Y. Brillhart and J. H. Keller were elected 
delegates to represent the Codorus Church at District Meeting. 
D. Y. Brillhart was chosen as a delegate to the Annual 
Meeting. Jacob L. Myers was appointed correspondent clerk. 
Brother George Ness wishing to be relieved from the office of 
treasurer, Brother J. L. Myers was elected by a unanimous 
consent of the church. 

1906— April 16, 1906, a plan to establish a dividing line 
between the Codorus and Upper Codorus, and Pleasant Hill 
Congregations was desired. It was decided to appoint a com- 
mittee of three to make a dividing line. The committee was 
John H. Keller, Jacob M. Myers, and Jacob L. Myers. There 
was a request from a number of members near the New 
Freedom house to have it painted and fixed to hold Love 
Feasts in it. Their request was granted. The committee was 
Daniel Keeney, and John Y. Keeney. September 29, 1906, 
Codorus Church met in special council at the New Freedom 
house. The report of the committee appointed to make a 
dividing line between Codorus, Upper Codorus, and Pleasant 
Hill Congregations, was read and accepted by the Codorus 
Church, which read as follows : 
"To Whom it May Concern — 

"Know all men by these presents that on the eighth 
(8th) day of September, 1906, the committee com- 
posed of J. H. Keller, J. M. Myers and J. L. Myers 
appointed by the Codorus Church and the committee com- 
posed of Christian Geiman, Jonas Royer and A. S. 
Baugher, appointed by the Upper Codorus Church for the 
purpose of establishing a permanent line between the 



90 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

above named churches or congregations, have this day 
met at the house of George M. Baugher for the purpose 
of performing their duties. The line agreed upon is as 
follows : 

"Beginning at the intersection of the Hanover Branch 
Railroad and York Road at J. E. Zeigler's residence and 
the Abraham Miller's blacksmith shop, then following 
the public road to Rockville. Then following a stream of 
water to the intersection of Glen Rock and Manchester 
Road. Then a straight line to Baltzlers school house. 
Then following a public road to Stiltz post office and 
Middletown, Maryland. 

"J. H. KELLER, 

"Chairman of the Joint Committee. 




Elder J. H. Keller and Wife 

"Also that the same committee of the Codorus 
Church met the committee of the Pleasant Hill Church, 
composed of S. K. Jacobs and Henry M. Baugher. On 
September 23, 1906, they agreed upon the following line 
of division between the Codorus and Pleasant Hill 
Church : 'Beginning at J. E. Zeigler's residence eastward 
to Hanover Junction. Thence following the Northern 
Central Railroad northward to the line of the York 
Church/ 

"J. H. KELLER, 

"Chairman of the Committee. " 
The above report was accepted by the Codorus Church at 
council meeting held at New Freedom, September 29, 1906. 
1907 — March 29, 1907, the report of the committee 
appointed to form a plan to enlarge the Pleasant Hill meeting 
house was heard. It was decided to build a piece to the house 
not over 20 feet and not less than 16 feet. Building committee : 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 91 

Jacob M. Myers, John Hartman, Samuel B. Myers, David Y. 
Brillhart, and Frederick Grove. 

1908 — December 20, 1908, Deacon Clayton Weaver and 
wife, were accepted by certificate. 

1909 — January 1, 1909, the Codorus Church met in 
yearly council. A committee was appointed to locate a place 
to build a church house at the north end of the congregation. 
The first place was on the farm owned by David Markey, the 
other place owned by Mr. Hovis. Committee was discharged. 
February 8, 1909, at a special council meeting it was moved 
to build a church house at the cemetery on the farm owned by 
David Markey. Also moved to appoint a committee of five as 
a building committee. Committee appointed is as follows: 
Jacob Markey, David Markey, George Strebig, Howard Fitz, 
Daniel Markey. February 15, 1909 — A special council was 
held. It was decided to hold an election, to elect three breth- 
ren as trustees; one for three (3) years, one for two (2) years, 
one for one (1) year. One was to be elected each following 
year. The term to begin January 1, 1909. Brethren elected 
as trustees: Jacob L. Myers, three years; Howard Fitz, two 
years; David Brillhart, one year. June 14, 1909, the Codorus 
Church met in special council meeting. Elders Albert 
Hollinger and Joseph Long were present. Jacob F. Myers was 
ordained to the full ministry. An election was held for a 
minister. The lot fell on Jacob L. Myers. An election was 
held for a presiding elder. David Y. Brillhart was elected for 
three (3) years. December 6th, the Codorus Church met in 
quarterly council. Prayer being offered by Brother Albert 
Hollinger. An election was held to elect two deacons. 
Brethren Samuel Keeney and Robert Krout were elected. Our 
present treasurer, Jacob L. Myers, has resigned. Brother 
John Hartman was appointed to succeed Brother Myers. 

1910 — Samuel Y. Keeney died February 24, 1910; aged 
81 years and 21 days. Andrew Myers died October 18th, 
1910; aged 83 years, eight months, and 19 days. 

1911 — January 2, 1911, Brother J. H. Keller who was 
appointed to solicit money to build a church house in the 
Borough of Shrewsbury reported as follows: Lot valued at 
$550.00 was donated, and $1,998.00 subscribed. Trustee 
elected is Howard Fitz. April 17, 1911, the trustees reported 
that the debt on the Fairview house was paid and $868.00 cash 
on hand. Brother David Y. Brillhart resigned as trustee. 
Daniel B. Keeney was elected to serve in D. Y. Brillhart's stead 
until January 1, 1913. June 19, 1911, an election was held to 
elect a building committee for the Shrewsbury house. John 
Keller, Lewis Keeney, Daniel B. Keeney, Jacob L. Myers, and 
David Y. Brillhart were elected. April 29, 1911, Elder 
Christian Ness died, aged 80 years, six months, and 21 days. 
1912 — January 1, 1912, an election for two deacons was 
announced, resulting in a majority for one brother and a tie 



"92 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

for two others. The church decided to accept the three 
Howard Fitz, Jacob Markey, and Michael Markey were duly 
installed by Brother E. S. Miller. Brother J. L. Myers was 
advanced to the second degree of the ministry. Ministers were 
David Y. Brillhart, Jacob Myers, Samuel B. Myers, John H 
Keller, Israel Bowser, Jacob L. Myers ; deacons were EmanueJ 
Lehman, Jacob Myers, Milton Lehman, Samuel Keeney, 
Robert Krout, Clayton Weaver, Howard Fitz, Jacob Markev 
and Michael Markey. 

1913 — May 24, 1913, the Codorus Congregation 
assembled in council at the East Codorus house. Upon motion 
of the church, the building committee for the Shrewsbury 
house was discharged. July 21, 1913, the unfinished business 
from the last council regarding the appointment of a mission 
committee was taken up. September 22, 1913, council. The 
elders made the appointment of the missionary committee as 
follows : Robert Krout, three years ; Sister Keller, two years ; 
I. M. Bowser, one year. 

1915 — November 1, 1915, Emanuel Lehman died, aged 
76 years. It was requested that members be admonished to 
live up to their word. Brother Conner strongly urged that 
each brother and sister be as good as his word. Members 
should be warned against pride, wearing of gold, adorning 
the hair, etc. 

1916— April 24, 1916, the Codorus Church met in council. 
An election was held for a minister of the Gospel. Brother 
Daniel Bowser read the qualifications and Brother Conner led 
in prayer. Brother Michael Markey was elected. 

1917 — January 1, 1917, the Codorus Church met in 
council. Brethren E. S. Miller and Daniel Bowser took charge 
of the meeting and held an election for two deacons. As there 
were three brethren nearly equal, the church decided to 
accept three instead of two. Brother George Keeney and wife 
and Brother Edward Keeney and wife were installed. Brother 
Samuel Godfrey and wife were installed later at preaching 
services. Ministers were Elder David Brillhart, Elder Jacob 
M. Myers, Samuel B. Myers, John H. Keller, Israel Bowser, 
Jacob L. Myers, and C. F. Weaver; deacons were Milton 
Lehman, Samuel Keeney, Robert Krout, Howard Fitz, Jacob 
Markey, George Keeney, Edward Keeney, and Samuel 
Godfrey. Trustees were Howard Fitz, Daniel Keeney, and 
_ Hartman. September 4, 1917, Annual Meet- 
ing ruling regarding advancement of ministers to the second 
degree. It was decided that an elder deliver the charge. 
Brother Michael Markey and wife were advanced. 

1918 — April 8, 1918, the Codorus Church met in council. 
Brother E. S. Miller held an election for a presiding elder. 
Brother D. Y. Brillhart was elected presiding elder for three 
years. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



93 




Elder S. B. Myers and Wife 



1919— January 1, 1919, 

Elder D. Y. Brillhart stated 

that he needs help in the 

eldership. For that purpose, 

Elder Brillhart called for 

elders to conduct ordination. 

Elder J. A. Long and E, S. 

Miller now took charge of 

the meeting, which resulted 

in the election and ordina- 
tion of Brother Samuel B. 

Myers as elder. The church 

trustees elected at Fairview 

are as follows : Michael 

Markey, elected for three 

(3) years; Harry Markey, 

elected for two (2) years; 

Howard Miller, elected for 

one (1) year. 

1920 — Codorus Church 

met in quarterly council. 

Elder Daniel Bowser opened 

the meeting. Elder Long 

led in prayer after which he 

talked on the qualifications of a deacon. Elder Long stated 
that the choice of the church was Brethren Harry Sellers and 
Lewis Keeney. 

1921 — August 15, 1921, the Codorus Church met in 
special council at the Fairview house. The meeting was 
opened by Elder C. L. Baker. The matter of organizing a new 
congregation was taken up. The boundary line suggested by 
the official board was accepted by the church — 142 voting for 
and 12 against. It was decided that the new congregation be 
called New Fairview. May 22, 1921, Elder Jacob M. Myers 
died, aged 87 years. September 26, 1921, Brother Edward 
Keeney was elected church treasurer. Sister Katie Godfrey 
was appointed on our missionary committee for three years. 
Sister Amanda Hartman was appointed on the child rescue 
committee for three years. 

1922 — January 2, 1922, council meeting. A motion was 
made that hereafter sisters should break the bread the same 
as the brethren do at our communion. Motion passed. Elders 
Daniel Bowser and A. S. Baugher were with us to hold an 
election for a minister. Brother D. Edw. Keeney was elected. 
An election was held for two deacons. Brethren Charles Ness 
and Martin Hartman were elected. 

1924 — Codorus Church met in quarterly council April 21, 
1924. Our elders stated an election for two deacons is to be 
held. Elders C. L. Baker and Daniel Bowser took the vote of 
the church. Brethren Harry Hartman and Samuel Lerew 



94 Historx— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

were elected deacons and with their wives were installed. 
The church agreed to ordain Brother J. L. Myers to the elder- 
ship. Brother Myers and wife were ordained. October 13, 
1924, it was decided to have Christian Workers meeting 
Sunday evenings before preaching. 

1925 — January 1, ministers were Elder David Y. 
Brillhart, presiding elder; Elder Samuel B. Myers, Elder John 
H. Keller, Elder Jacob L. Myers, Brother Samuel C. Godfrey, 
and Brother D. Edw. Keeney; deacons were Milton Lehman, 
Daniel Keeney, Lewis Keeney, Harry Sellers, Chas. H. Ness, 
Martin Hartman, and Harry Hartman. 

1926— October 18, 1926, quarterly council at the 
Shrewsbury house. A motion to appoint the ministers and 
deacons wives as a committee to look after anything out of 
order among the sisters and such other work as they may deem 
necessary. Motion was passed. 

1927 — January 3, 1927, the Codorus Church met in coun- 
cil at 1 P.M. J. L. Myers was elected presiding elder for one 
(1) year. 

1928 — January 2, 1928, at a council meeting, Elder J. L. 
Myers was re-elected presiding elder for one (1) year. John 
H. Keller died May 26, 1928. 

1929 — January 1, 1929, the Codorus Church met in 
quarterly council at the Codorus house at 1:30 P.M. The 
meeting was opened by Elder David Y. Brillhart. A motion was 
made that Elders A. S. Baugher and L. E. Leas be accepted, 
as a committee to hold an election for ministers and deacons. 
Ministers licensed were William Sweitzer, George Keeney, and 
Martin M. Hartman. Deacons elected were Obed Frey, Roy 
Myers, S. Benj. Myers, and J. A. Godfrey. December 29, 
1929, Elders I. W. Beahm and S. B. Myers installed Brother 
William Sweitzer in the ministry. September 8, 1929, Elder 
David Y. Brillhart died, aged 74 years, six months, five days. 

1930— January 1, 1930, Elders E, S. Miller and A. S. 
Baugher installed Brother George H. Keeney to the ministry. 
February 9, 1930, Elders M. A. Jacobs and S, B. Myers in- 
stalled Brother Martin M. Hartman in the ministry. Brother 
S, C. Godfrey was ordained to the eldership. An election was 
held for a presiding elder for one year. S. B. Myers was 
elected. July 14, Codorus Church met in council. Elders A. 
S. Baugher and L. E. Leas took charge of the meeting. Elder 
Leas read the qualifications of a minister, after which they 
proceeded to take the vote of the church. Brother Obed Frey 
was licensed to preach for one year. 

1931 — January 1, 1931, Codorus Church met in council. 
Elders A. S. Baugher and M. A. Jacobs took charge of the 
meeting. Elder Jacobs read the qualifications of a deacon. 
Election for two deacons was held. Brethren George Fuhrman 
and William Bailey were elected. July 20, Codorus Church 
met in council. The meeting was opened by Elder M. A. 




<D 

T3 



^^ 
c»CO 

o . 
. ^ 

09 

CO fl 









CD 

3 



CD 

& . 



o3 OCJ 



^5 

CD 



o 

< 

o 

o 
U 

CO 

P 

O 

Q 
O 

u 

fa 
o 



3 

o 

W 

•J 



fa 
fa 

O 



o3 

s 

CD 

o 



03 



o 

0/' 

Q 



o 
o 
o3 

CD 

Q 



o 
o 

CD 

Q 



o 

o3 
CD 

Q 
o 
fl 

O 

O 

CD 

CO 



03 •!— I 

CO 

,4 

o 

•-a 



o 

CD 

o 



CD 



T3 >> 

CD CD 

03 «H 
CD T3 
W O 

>» . 

CD 

CD 

M 



= 

c 
w 

CD 

2 A 

03 <U 



- 

03 



o 



<: 



£ w 



a 



s 

CD 

T3 



CD^ ^h 



CD 
T3 



CD 
^ CD 

WW 

bJO 

fl 
•i— i 

'D 

G 

o3 

OS 






CO 

CD 

•• S 2 



bC 



<4H 



O 
O 
o3 

CD 

Q 
FH 

CD 

I— H 

'a; 
CO 

>» 

H 

M 

H 

o 

03 

CD 



CD 
- 
CD 



4« 



^JSfe 



T3 

o3 

^ CD ^ 

PQ 



a; 



03 



o 



'/) 



a 






co^Qt-3 



96 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Jacobs. Elders A. S. Baugher and M. A. Jacobs being present 
took the vote of the church to install Brother Obed Frey to the 
ministry. The vote was unanimous. Brother Obed Frey and 
his wife were installed. Brother William Bailey and wife and 
Brother George Fuhrman and wife were installed deacons. 

1933 — January 2, 1933, W. Group and M. A. Jacobs took 
the vote of the church to ordain Brother D. Edw. Keeney to 
eldership. Ministers were Elder Samuel B. Myers, Elder 
Samuel C. Godfrey, Elder D. Edw. Keeney, Brother Wm. 
Sweitzer, Brother George H. Keeney, Brother Martin M. Hart- 
man, and Brother Obed Frey. Deacons were Milton Lehman, 

Daniel Keeney, Harry M. 

Hartman, G. Roy Myers, S. 

Benj. Myers, J. A. Godfrey, 

George Fuhrman and Wm. 

Bailey. 

1941 — Presiding elder 
S. C. Godfrey ; ministers are : 
D. B. Myers, George H. 
Keeney, D. Edward Keeny, 
M. M. Hartman, Obed Frey, 
Samuel Lerew, Samuel K. 
Sweitzer, and George Fuhr- 
man; deacons are: Milton 
Lehman, G. Roy Myers, Wm. 
Bailey, H. M. Hartman, J. A. 
Godfrey, S. Benj. Myers, 
Harry Sellers, John E. 
Krout, John Sieling, C. E. 
Godfrey, and M. Emore 
Lehman. 




Sunday School 



Elder S. C. Godfrey and Wife 



While it is supposed 
that they had Sunday school 
at the Codorus church house prior to 1904, there is no record 
before December 26, 1904, when an organization of the 
Sunday school was held, resulting as follows: Superintendent, 
S. B. Myers; Secretary, Kate Hildebrand; Treasurer, Thomas 
Ness; Librarian, Chester Bahn; Assistant, Milton Bahn; 
Librarian, Gestie Ness; Assistant, Kate Lehman. 



The Codorus Congregation — Church Houses 

The Codorus Church House was built in the year A.D. 
1872. It is supposed the building committee was Jacob 
Brillhart, George Ness, Martin Feigley, John Godfrey and 
Andrew Myers. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



97 




Pleasant Hill Church, Codorus Congregation 







New Freedom Church, Codorus Congregation 



98 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

The Pleasant Hill meeting house, in the Codorus Congre- 
gation, was built in the year A.D. 1875 by Jacob Herbst and 
wife, Julian, in memory of their daughter, Julian, who was a 
member of the Brethren Church and died June 11th, 1873, 
aged 19 years, six months, and 22 days. She was the first 
person to be buried in the grave yard at the Codorus Church. 




Shrewsbury Church, Codorus Congregation 



The New Freedom Church House was built in 1883. The 
building committee is supposed to have been composed of five 
members. Those that are remembered are as follows : Samuel 
Bowser, Benjamin F. Bowser, and Samuel Keeney. 

The Shrewsbury Church House was built in the year A.D. 
1912. The building committee was composed of John Keller, 
Lewis Keeney, Daniel B. Keeney, Jacob L. Myers and David Y. 
Brillhart. 

The membership of the Codorus Congregation is 375. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



99 







Elder Wm. C. Koontz and Wife 



FALLING SPRINGS CONGREGATION 

The Falling Springs 

Congregation was separated 

from the Antietam Congre- 
gation on September 19, 

1866. The bishops of the 

congregation since then have 

been William Boyer, David 

Bock, Joseph Gipe, William 

Koontz, Samuel Gearhart, 

and Welty Smith, the present 

incumbent. 

When the Old Order 

Brethren withdrew in 1881, 

David Bock and Joseph Gipe 

joined with them, leaving 

William Koontz as the only 

minister. Elder Adam Pheil 

of Back Creek Congregation 

had oversight of the Falling 

Springs Congregation until 

the ordination of Elder Wil- 
liam Koontz who held this 

position until his death on February 14, 1917. 

The following ministers have served the congrega- 
tion from 1881 to the present time: Adam Baker, Isaac 

Riddlesberger, William An- 
thony, David Bonebrake 
(who went along with the 
Old Order Brethren in the 
division, but, returned to the 
church on May 8, 1903, and 
was restored to the ministry 
in the degree in which he 
was, when he left, on Sep- 
tember 10, 1904), Peter Leh- 
man who later moved to 
Chambersburg and served 
that church for many years, 
Emanuel Shrader, Harry 
Brindle who moved to Polo, 
Illinois, Guy Hartman who 
now resides near Berlin, 
Somerset County, Pennsyl- 
vania, Daniel Flohr who 
joined with the Dunkard 
Brethren, but who returned 
to this church as a lay mem- 
Elder Samuel E. Gearhart ber on March 11, 1939, Wil- 




100 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder Welty G. Smith 



Ham Hollinger who moved 
from our district, and 
Samuel Gearhart who died 
on January 6, 1936, while 
serving as presiding elder. 

The present active min- 
istry consists of presiding 
elder, Welty G. Smith; D. 
Emmert StoufFer, Franklin 
Wagaman, Lowell Gearhart, 
and Omar Nicarry. 

The present corps of 
deacons are Brethren Harry 
Stamy, Harry Spangler, 
Harvey Senger, Jacob Bone- 
brake, Jacob Statler, Guy 
Stamy, Paul Wildeson, Jesse 
Beeler, Samuel Plum, Edgar 
Wolfkill, John Brubaker, 
and Aaron Hartman. 

Among the members of 
this congregation in the Fall 
of 1881 were the following :* 
William Tolhelm and wife, D. F. Eoyer and wife, Henry 
Koontz and wife, William Koontz and wife, Samuel Hollinger 
and wife, Adam Baker and wife, Christian Stover and wife, 
Isaac Shank and wife, Goodlove Hays and wife, John Swigert 
and wife, Israel Brown and wife, David Mowen, Jacob Stover, 
Sr., Mitchell Stover and wife, Mollie Werdebaugh, Solomon 
Whitmore, Annie Hollinger, Frank Skeggs and wife, George 
Ilgmfritz and wife, Mrs. William Stover, Joshua Skeggs, John 
Shoup and wife, Catharine Phillipy, Annie Stoler, Lilly Hull, 
Susan Foutz, Rebecca Foutz, Susan Keener, Ida Izer, Elizabeth 
Grimes, Nancy Hawbaker, Laura Bixler, Christian Royer, Mrs. 

Diehl, Hannah Royer, Mrs. Wireman, Eliza Lear, 

Adam Zarker, Abraham Kauffman, Rebecca Black, Catharine 
Hager, Lizzie Hollinger, Kate Foutz, Annie Shank, Alice 
Brechbill, Martha Hager, Mrs. Joseph Winger, Samuel 
Kauffman, wife and daughter; Isaac Riddlesberger and wife, 
Jennie Null, Samuel Benedict and wife, Barbara Small and 
daughter, Kate Friedly and daughter, James Heefner and 
wife and daughter, Susan Benedict, Christian Benedict, Susan 
Harshman, Elizabeth Null, Susan Whitmore, Obed Knepper 
and wife, John Fahrney and wife and daughter, Annie 
Kauffman, Catharine Gsell, Jacob Taill and wife, Jacob 

Fahrney and wife, Ida Grove, Patterson and wife, 

Samuel Pittinger and wife, Jacob Etter and wife. 

In the spring of 1881 the following persons withdrew and 
formed an Old German Baptist Brethren congregation : David 

*From printed records in the hands of the Secretary of the Historical Committee. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



101 





Elder D. Emmert Stouffer 



Elder B. Franklin Wagaman 





Elder C. Lowell Gearhart 



Minister S. Omar Nicarry 



102 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Bonebrake and wife, John Benedict and wife, David Thompson 
and wife, Alexander Knepper, Henry Hallet, Henry Knepper 
and wife, George Decker and wife, Henry Good, Sr., Henry 
Good, Jr., and wife, Mary Monn, Adam Small and wife, David 
Bock and daughter, George Rossman and wife, Ida Small, 
Christian Sheller and wife, Maggie Grove, Emma Knepper, 
Kate McKinsey, George Baker and wife, Jacob Deardorff and 
wife, Abraham Deardorff and wife, Ruie Wolf, Jacob Null 
and wife, Charlotte Grove, John Grove, wife and daughter; 
Maria Lehman, John Deardorff, Isaac Small and wife, 
Christian Heller and wife, Andrew Gipe and wife, Benjamen 
Stouffer and wife, John Miller and wife, George Singer, Chris- 
tian Royer, Michal Hoover and wife, Philip Grove and wife, 
Lizzie Gioul, Annie Royer, George Slothour, and John Hess. 
After the separation of this Old German Baptist Brethren 
group (which comprised about one-third of the congregation) 
from the parent church the problem arose as to which group 
was the rightful owner of the four church houses in the 
congregation. Since some of the seceders had given much 
toward the erection of the buildings they were reluctant to 
relinquish claims thereto. An appeal was made to the Equity 
Court to make the decision. Elders D. P. Saylor and David 
Long gave testimony in behalf of the parent congregation. 
Before a decision was reached an amicable agreement was 
made whereby the church houses are held as common prop- 
erty and are used by each without interfering with the rights 
of the other. 

The houses of worship in this congregation given chrono- 
logically are: Mount Zion (Union), Falling Springs, Brown's 
Mill, Hade, and Shady Grove. 

Mount Zion Church 

Elizabeth (Betty) Knepper gave one-half acre of land on 
which to build the Mount Zion church and for the old part of 
the grave-yard. This church was erected sometime between 
1840 and 1845. A new one has been erected since. This is 
the union church, being used regularly as a preaching place 
by the Church of the Brethren, Old Order Brethren and the 
Snow Hill unit of the Seventh Day Baptists. All other de- 
nominations have free use of the church on funeral occasions. 

The Mount Zion Cemetery has a unique history. It 
carries an organization with a set of trustees separate from 
the other churches. Two additional pieces have been added 
to the burying ground. The cemetery is heavily endowed and 
is one of the prettiest burying spots in the country. 

Brown's Mill Church 

There seems to be no complete record available today 
giving information of the various steps taken leading up to 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



103 





Brown's Mill Church 



plans for securing of a site and erection of the Antrim or 
Brown's Mill meeting house. There is a record kept in an old 
book in the church, however, stating that the erection took 
place in 1855 ; and a further entry stating that the first sermon 
was preached therein, in November, 1855. It would be reason- 
able to assume that this first sermon was part of the dedicatory 
service. 

The ground on which this church was erected and the 
burial plot were given for these purposes by George Royer, 
as the deed issued two years later proves. This land was 
taken from the southwest corner of his Brown's Mill Farm 
which he ostensibly had given to his daughter in 1836 when 
she married Abraham Kauffman, but the title transfer had 
not been made. 

Some confusion has arisen over date of construction — 
those going to the office of Recorder of Deeds getting the year 
December 1st, 1857. The facts seem to be that issuing a deed 
covering what was a donation complied with custom and 
recites sale by George Royer to the German Baptist Society of 
the Antrim district of one acre and eight perches of land (set- 
ting forth location and for what purpose) for the sum of one 
dollar. The deed was issued and recorded about the time he 
was disposing of his property by distribution to his children 
and as he was about to deed his Brown's Mill farm to his 
daughter, Catherine (Royer) Kauffman. 



104 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

The contractor erecting the Brown's Mill Church was 
Jacob Kauffman, brother of Abraham Kauffman. The brick- 
layer employed by him was David Pentz. As was the custom, 
much of the hauling of building material and manual labor 
was donated. In this connection it is of some interest to recall 
that Christian Royer (the third Christian in succession) then 
living on his father's farmstead between Brown's Mill and 
Greencastle hauled many loads of brick and other material as 
his family's labor contribution toward the erection of this 
church. Later this (third) Christian Royer was elected to the 
ministry and subsequently elder in the Old German Baptist 
Brethren Church of Falling Spring Congregation. 

The part of the grounds used for burial purposes has 
been by common consent, merged with additional ground in 
control of an organization known as the "Antrim Burial 
Association" and is kept in splendid condition. 

In 1866 after the removal of the Brown's Mill Mennonite 
Meeting House just across the highway from the church, title 
was secured for this site, including seventy-three perches 
of land. This was procured for "hitching ground 
purposes". 

George Royer (1778-1891), was the son of Christian 
Royer (1749-1814) and Nancy (Stohler) Royer (1749-1811), 
both of whom were baptized at the Conestoga Church 
November 1st, 1777. They had come from Lancaster County 
to the Wharf on the Antietam in 1793, when George was not 
yet fifteen years of age, and joined the Prices, Stovers and 
others in erecting the first Price Church. When the father, 
Christian, died, George Royer came into possession of the 
homestead at the Wharf and together with his eldest brother, 
John (the Rev. Hannas), loyally supported the church. It is 
a matter of church history that the Annual Meeting was held 
at his home at the Wharf in 1829. 

The youngest brother of George Royer, Christian (the 
second Christian) (1787-1864), and his wife, Catherine 
(Stover) Royer (1792-1851), the daughter of Bishop Daniel 
Stover (1759-1822), and granddaughter of Bishop William 
Stover (1725-1800), resided in the Brown's Mill area from 
1828 on. 

Catherine (Royer) Kauffman and her husband, Abraham 
Kauffman, had resided on the farm, from which the building- 
site was taken, since 1836 and had been opening their homes 
for worship with great regularity. Even to this day some of 
the benches used in this home are stored in the garret. How 
many other families around Brown's Mill were equally 
active in giving their homes for church purposes is not 
known. 

Because of the congregation's lack of historical data, in- 
formation concerning the other three churches was secured 
from the court house records as follows : 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



105 



Falling Springs Church 

The German Sunday Baptist Church, Falling Springs Con- 
gregation within the bounds of the Antietam District, pur- 
chased from Jacob Ditch and his wife, Mary, January 16, 1855, 
for the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) one acre neat 
measure of land never to be sold unless agreed by a majority 
of its members. (Vol. 28, page 362.) A large stone church 
was erected thereon. The trustees of this congregation were 
William Boyer, Joash Horn and John R. Yockey. 

Sunday school is held at the Brown's Mill and Shady 
Grove churches. 

The present membership of the congregation is 239. 

Hade Church 

On July 6, 1869, Emanuel Hade sold to Samuel Small, 
Daniel Benedict, Jacob Hollinger and Christian Royer, trustees 
of the German Baptist Church of the Falling Springs Congre- 
gation, Lot No. 1 containing 161 perches and Lot No. 2 con- 
taining 131 perches for the sum of one dollar ($1.00). Lot 
No. 2 is to have a church house erected thereon. An agree- 
ment is recorded between Mary Hade (Polly) and the trustees 
of the German Baptist Church to build a church house at her 
expense and according to her specifications, the brethren to 
furnish the labor free, (Vol. 47, pages 440 and 441). The 
building and land to revert to the donor if these specifications 
are not fulfilled. The result is the present large stone 
structure. 




Hade Church 




OS 

p 

W 
O 

W 

O 

I— I 
- 

O 

- 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 107 

Vol. 85, page 220, records a tract of seventy-nine and 
forty-three-one-hundredths perches of land, adjoining the 
Hade Church property as sold to Adam Baker and William 
Talhelm, committee, German Baptist Church by John K. 
Snively and Mary, his wife, to be used for a hitching ground 
and when not used as such shall revert to its grantors. 

Brother D. L. Miller, of sainted memory, preached his 
last sermon in the Hade Church in May, 1921. 

Well kept burial grounds are a part of the Falling Springs 
and Hade church property. 

The Shady Grove Church 

On November 6, 1877, the German Baptist Church, pur- 
chased from John S. Grove and Annie E. Grove, his wife, 
twenty and seven-tenths perches of land with the right to use 
the well. (Vol. 60, page 315.) 

Sometime later Adam Baker, D. F. Royer, Philip Grove 
and Jonathan Baker (the committee appointed) purchased, 
for the consideration of one dollar ($1.00), twenty-six perches 
and the right to use the well. 

On Lot No. 1 the present brick structure was erected in 
1877. 

On April 5, 1904, John S. Grove and Annie E. Grove, his 
wife, sold to the trustees of the Shady Grove German Baptist 
Churcn, forty-eight perches of land for the sum of ninety 
dollars ($90.00). This piece was an extension to the hitching 
grounds. 



GREENCASTLE CONGREGATION 

About thirty-five years ago some of our folk conceived 
the idea that we should have a church in Greencastle, in con- 
nection with the Shank Church and persuant to this, our Elder 
D. A. Foust requested us to get an option on the C. V. Depot, 
where Dr. Sowell lives. The option was secured and Brother 
Foust presented the matter to District Conference. No 
encouragement was given us and we were without a church 
home in Greencastle for 35 years. 

However, the home department of the Shank Sunday 
school served a few members here and later as more brethren 
moved into the town there was conducted a teacher training 
class of about ten members of whom the oldest was seventy 
years of age, (Mrs. Mary C. Miller). 

From time to time there was expressed by the majority 
of the members, a strong desire to have a meeting place in the 
town which finally took shape October, 1927, in a petition to 
District Meeting to get permission to hold public worship in 
town. The petition was circulated and signed by 77 members 



108 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

of the church living in Greencastle, and was presented to 
District Meeting in Waynesboro October, 1927. 

Conference appointed a committee of three elders, W. G. 
Group, D. E. Miller, and A. S. Baugher, to meet with the 
Falling Springs and the Back Creek Congregations in which 
Greencastle was located. These meetings resulted in a called 
meeting of the resident members, in the store of the late Jacob 
Foust, February 21-28. A temporary chairman was elected 
and the committee of elders gave the result of their meetings 
with the two adjoining congregations, Falling Springs and 
Back Creek. The elders' decision was that if the brethren 
living in Greencastle would be willing to be placed under the 
supervision of the ministerial board of the district, the latter 
would supply a minister for each service. The Greencastle 
brethren were to secure a place of worship and to finance the 
work. Chairman Group promised also that he would preach 
the first sermon if the plan was accepted. A temporary organ- 
ization was effected as follows: Chairman, L. H. Leiter; Vice 
chairmen, Jacob Foust and Galen Fox; Secretary, Margie 
Fox; Treasurer, W. W. Leiter. 

Arrangements formerly made with Methodist brethren 
were quickly completed for the use of their beautiful house 
of worship each Sunday evening and Brother Group, accord- 
ing to promise, preached the first sermon to a full house, 
March 4, 1928. 

Another meeting was then called for the members of the 
church March 22, 1928, when the temporary officers were 
retained until District Meeting in October. At this meeting 
a motion was made by the late Norman L. Kuhn, Jr., and 
seconded by Paul Foust, to organize a Sunday school. The 
first session was held April 1, 1928. The Waynesboro Church 
graciously loaned us hymnals which were used until 100 new 
song books were given in memory of the lad who had moved 
to organize the Sunday school. Waynesboro Church also gave 
us envelopes for our church offerings. 

District Meeting in 1929 decided to keep us under the 
supervision of the District Ministerial Board which supplied 
the pulpit for another year. In all, forty-eight different men 
preached for us. 

It was decided at a called meeting, October 19, 1930, to 
petition District Meeting to organize a church in Greencastle. 
The request was granted and conference sent Elders C. L. 
Baker, S. S. Miller and W. G. Group. On December 19, 1930, 
a new congregation was formed with sixty-nine charter 
members. 

Our first pastor, J. W. Whitacre, was installed January 
25th, 1931, and our first Love Feast was held May 10th, 1931, 
with 122 communicants. Sister Ruth Myers presented the 
church with a communion set in memory of Norman Kuhn. 
Sister Katie Gilland presented the church with tubs and basins 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



109 



s 



for this Love Feast. Brother Galen Fox made the table 
and the book racks on the back of the seats. Preparation for 
the Lord's Supper was made in a private home by the members 
and officers of the church. The Ladies' Aid furnished the 
dishes and linens. A pulpit Bible has been presented by 
Sister Mrs. Wm. Stover. Glen Stover presented 100 new 
hymnals in memory of his father, Roy Stover. Various 
members have acted as sexton and all have cooperated to keep 
the work of the church going in the various activities pre- 
scribed at Elgin and the Southern District of Pennsylvania. 
If and when the treasury became depleted there were always 
those who freely replenished it. 

We were at some disadvantage in having Sunday school 
and worship in the evening but we are all grateful to our 
Heavenly Father who always supplies all our needs accord- 
ing to the riches of His glory. We would not forget the kind 
church hospitality either, of our Methodist brethren for their 




Greencastle Church of the Brethren 



110 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

graciousness in renting this beautiful edifice which we have 
come to love as our own church home. 

A building fund was established at the first meeting after 
the organization by one who had a vision and gave liberally, 
Sister Leah Diehl. Others added to this fund from time to 
time. 

We have been fortunate in having the wise guidance of 
our District Ministerial Board, our own local ministerial board 
and our capable adjoining elders who have guided and 
presided at our business meetings. 

One of our young men, James Beahm, has been ordained 
to the ministry. Six deacons have been elected and four 
installed. Men's Work and Young People's Division, prayer 
meetings, teacher training classes and vacation church schools 
have been carried on at times. 

Several Bible terms and revival meetings have been held 
and the first anniversary observed January 11, 1932. 

A total of sixty-three names are recorded on our cradle 
roll. Fifty-eight have been baptized. Twenty-eight have 
been added to the church by letter and two have been 
reclaimed. Seventeen have been removed by letter and four- 
teen by death. Our membership when organized was sixty- 
nine and today it is one hundred and twenty-four. 

The church was purchased from the Methodists for 
$6,000. Of this amount $2,700 was paid in cash, $832 
subscribed, leaving a balance of $2,468. 

"Today we come to our twelfth anniversary of the first 
meeting in this church and of its birth. It is with mingled 




Interior of Greencastle Church of the Brethren 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



111 




Official Board, Greencastle 

feelings of joy and sadness that we celebrate this occasion. 
We realize it is no light thing for our Methodist friends to 
give up their church which they love. We shall do well to 
manifest the same generosity to them that they have 
shown to us." 

Acceptance of deed by L. H. Leiter, March 3, 1940 : 
"This is one of the days to which the members of the 
Greencastle Church of the Brethren have been looking for- 
ward for many years. The time when we could have Sunday 




Choir, Greencastle 



112 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



school and worship in the morning. While we rejoice in this 
achievement, it is with profound sympathy for our Methodist 
friends who have labored long and hard to build and maintain 
this, their church home, and now as we accept this deed, have 
become homeless in a material sense. 

"We appreciate the hospitality of our Methodist brethren 
in sharing their church with us for the past twelve years, thus 
making it possible for both churches to exist. 

"And now, in return, we, the Church of the Brethren, 
extend to you and your flock and to any or all who desire to 
join us in worship here in this holy place a most hearty 
welcome. We assure you that these doors shall be wide open 
to you always. We want that you shall have the same home 
feeling, as you have enjoyed in the past, fn the new leadership 
of the Church of the Brethren." 

Elder J. I. Thomas served faithfully as part-time 
pastor for three and one-half years, making pastoral 
visits and filling our pulpit on Sunday evenings until 
April 1, 1941. 

On March 3, 1940, we started having Sunday school on 
Sunday mornings instead of Sunday evenings. The pulpit was 
filled by visiting ministers provided by our local ministerial 
board. At our quarterly business meeting the voice of the 
church was taken for a full-time pastor which resulted in the 
choice of our Elder C. E. Grapes, who accepted the call to take 

effect April 1, 1941. He 
was also re-elected our elder 
at the next meeting. 

Our church has been 
steadily growing. The pres- 
ent membership is 165. 

The organization as of 
April 1, 1941, is Elder and 
Pastor, C. E. Grapes; Secre- 
tary, Mrs. Margie Fox- 
Henry ; Deacons, L. H. 
Leiter, Norman L. Kuhn, 
Ray Foust, Alvin Zuck, and 
George Smith ; Ministerial 
Board, Wm. W. Leiter, Nor- 
man L. Kuhn, L. H. Leiter; 
Church Chorister, Paul 
Foust ; Treasurer, Norman L. 
Kuhn ; Financial Secretary, 
Paul Foust; Trustees, Clin- 
ton F. Hykes, Bruce Angle, 
L. H. Leiter, Paul Foust, and 
Ray Foust ; Financial Board, 
Elder C. E. Grapes Ray Fisher, Bruce Angle, 

Pastor of Greencastle Church. and W. W. Leiter ; Soliciting 




Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 113 



Committee, Mrs. Clinton Hykes, L. H. Leiter, Edgar Henry, 
Paul Foust, and Mrs. Margie Henry ; Sunday school officers- — 
L. H. Leiter, General Superintendent; Mrs. John W. Hartman, 
Divisional Superintendent; Mrs. Merle Snyder, Primary Super- 
intendent; Mrs. Norman L. Kuhn, Cradle Roll Superintendent; 
Miss Margaret Drake, Secretary; Edgar Henry, Treasurer; 
Miss Margaret Oellig, Chorister; and Mrs. Alice Oellig, Home 
Department Superintendent. 



THE HANOVER CONGREGATION 

The Hanover Congregation was organized on March 9, 
1902. According to the church record the charter members 
were the following: Henry Baker and wife, Eli McConly and 
wife, Wilson Harlacher and wife, Solomon Miller, Mrs. 
Andrew Brough, Amanda Raffensberger, Amanda Wilt, Mrs. 
Menchey, Lizzie Miller, Alice Hahn, Grace Hahn, Alvilda 
Laugerman, Emma Rohrbaugh, Annie Harlacher, Margaret 
Harlacher, Daniel Brenner, Edward Hetrick and wife, George 
Grim and wife, Sister Klinepeter, B. F. Masterson and wife, 
Leah Pressel, Sister Garman, Henry Laughman, Sister 
Rickrode, Simon Hohf, Lillie Hohf, Lucy Allewelt, Jesse B. 
Webster and wife, Ella. 

At the organization the District Mission Board was repre- 
sented by Elder J. A. Long who took charge of the work, 
being assisted by Elder Edward Miller and Brother B. F. 
Masterson. Brother Jesse B. Webster was chosen secretary 
and Brother Henry Baker, treasurer, according to the minutes 
recorded by J. B. Webster. 

Prior to the above date a mission point had been estab- 
lished here in 1897 by the District Mission Board of Southern 
Pennsylvania. Preaching services were held in Old Concert 
Hall, Center Square, and later in Bargelt Hall on Carlisle 
Street. In 1898 the mission board asked permission of district 
conference to build a church in Hanover. This was granted 
and solicitors were appointed for each of the fourteen congre- 
gations of the district. Heirs of Daniel Baer and wife donated 
the lot, on which the church now stands, in latter part of 1898. 
In the beginning of 1899 a church 60 feet by 40 feet was built 
of brick. 

The dedicatory services were held July 17, 1899, with 
Elder H. C. Early, of Virginia, using Matthew 16 : 18 as a text 
for his theme of "Church Building", with special emphasis on 
the foundation, the person of the builder and the owner of the 
church. In the evening he preached on the theme of the 
"Holy Spirit". A clipping from a newspaper says this : "More 
than an hour before the appointed time for opening the serv- 
ices, people began to arrive from every direction and at ten 



114 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Hanover Church as Remodeled by the Mission Board 




Hanover Church — Remodeled 1941 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



115 




Elder B. F. Masterson and Wife 



o'clock when the service opened there were not a few persons 
on the outside unable to gain admittance. " 

The reason the church was not organized before 1902 
appears to have been due to some opposition locally and 10 
boundary lines with the Upper Codorus and Upper Conewago 
Congregations. As early as November 9, 1899, the mission 
board decided to have the Hanover Church organized. On 
April 23, 1900, there was a meeting held with the two congre- 
gations and Brother B. F. Masterson was instructed to effect 
an organization as soon as 
the members within the 
boundaries should agree. On 
September 22 a vote was 
taken with eight for and 13 
against effecting an organ- 
ization. On November 20, 
1901, there was a petition 
for an organization and on 
April 15, 1902, the mission 
board records on its minutes 
that an organization was 
effected without a dissenting 
voice. 

The mission board sup- 
plied the pulpit until 1901 
when Brother B. F. Master- 
son, of California, was 
placed here by mission 
board. He remained here 
until August 10, 1902. Then 
the mission board seems to 
have filled the preaching 




appointments every four 



Elder D. H. Baker 



116 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder Henry S. Baker and Wife 

weeks until 1905. Later Elder D. H. Baker became a resident 
minister having served as a delegate to District Meeting, and 
Elder John Utz also moved into the area. This released the 
mission board from any responsibility. 

The ministers received by letter follow : B. F. Masterson, 
D. H. Baker, William Miller, John Utz, S. K. Utz, George 
Resser, E, S. Miller, B. C. Whitmore, D. L. Little, C. C. Brown, 
and J. W. Myer. 

Ministers elected within the congregation follow : H. S. 
Baker, April 1, 1914; J. E, Myers and J. M. Stauffer, October 
2, 1918; E. E. Baugher, December 14, 1932. 

Ministers ordained as elders in the congregation are as 
follows: William H. Miller, August 5, 1911 ; H. S. Baker, J. M. 
Stauffer, and J. E. Myers, December 18, 1929. 

Deacons received by letter: J. B. Webster and Edward 
Hetrick, at the time of organization ; Cornelius Weaver, April 




Deacon Edward K. Hetrick and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



117 



24, 1910; J. J. Price, September 26, 1914; E. E. Baugher, 
October 1, 1930. 

Thirteen deacons were elected in this congregation as 
follows: H. S. Baker, May 2, 1902; Wilson B. Harlacher, July 
22, 1903; William Raffensberger, July 1, 1908; Charles Staub 




. . ■ .■■■■■:::■:■.■.. .... /\ '.■.. .■... 





Deacon Cornelius Weaver and Wife 



and Charles Laugherman, April 1, 1914; J. M. Stauffer and 
Charles HuiT, April 5, 1916; Daniel Forry and J. E. Myers, 
April 4, 1917; George Shriver and Claude Miller, October 2, 

1918; Charles Hilbert, Octo- 
ber 7, 1927; Irvin Hostetter, 
October 4, 1933. 

The Ladies' Aid Society 
was organized June 5, 1915. 
Prayer was offered by D. H. 
Baker. The following offi- 
cers were elected : President, 
Margaret Lantz ; Vice Presi- 
dent, Mrs. D. H. Baker; Sec- 
retary, Lucy Shriver; Assist- 
ant Secretary, Mrs. William 
Miller ; Treasurer, Lucy 
Allewelt. For many years 
the officers have been : Presi- 
dent, Annie Harlacher; Vice 
President, Mrs. Emma Craw- 
ford ; and Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Gertrude Weaver. This 
organization has been instru- 
mental in helping to raise 
rather large missionary of- 
ferings and in coming to the 
Deacon Wilson B. Harlacher rescue of the church treasury 




118 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder B. C. Whitmore and Wife 



in repairing and repainting 
the church building. They 
meet once a week to do 
quilting and sewing. 

A young people's class 
named "Servants of the 
Master" was organized Sep- 
tember 18, 1915. The fol- 
lowing officers were elected : 
President, Charles Huff ; 
Vice President, Ada Miller; 
Secretary, Olive Garman ; 
Treasurer, Lydia Harding. 
The meetings were held in 
the homes every two weeks. 
It was active in helping to in- 
crease the offerings to mis- 
sions, and giving to local 
church expenses and to the 
poor. They also sent fruit 
and flowers to the sick and 
aged. This organization 
ceased upon the departure 
of B. C. Whitmore, their 
teacher, but it is still one of the Sunday school classes. 

Now another young people's class has been organized 
which is known as the "Willing Workers' Class". While the 
class has been one of our regular Sunday school classes for 
sometime, it was only organized on May 8, 1930. According 
to the minutes of the secretary of the class the following were 
the first officers : President, Ina Belle Jacobs ; Vice President, 
Effie Crawford ; Secretary, Mrs. Horace Walker ; Assistant 
Secretary, Mrs. Rebecca Strausbaugh ; and Treasurer, Horace 
Walker. The teachers of the class have been Howard 
Allewelt, Horace Walker, and Mary Gauntz. The present 
teacher is Brother Milton Baugher, a teacher in the senior high 
school of Hanover. This class has meetings in the homes once 
a month. They have visited the sick, sent flowers to the sick, 
sponsored special programs at Sunday evening services and 
are planning to support a share plan through the General 
Mission Board at Elgin. 

The Sunday school has been active from the very begin- 
ning. The offerings have grown from fifty cents to five or six 
dollars per Sunday. The attendance has grown to such an 
extent that an addition to the church has been added so that 
there are more separate rooms. Practically all the classes are 
giving to the building fund which was started January 27, 
1935. Some contribute each week. M. M. Baugher is super- 
intendent of the Sunday school and has had much to do in 
starting the fund. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



119 



Miss Annie E. Harlacher has had charge of the Begin- 
ners' Department of the Sunday school for many years. She 
assisted in conducting Bible school several weeks each summer 
for three years ; served on the building fund committee, and 
on the building committee for the improvements now just com- 
pleted at the church. Since the organization of the church 
she has maintained an unfailing interest in all the work of the 
church, especially the children's work. She was born August 
29, 1868, near East Berlin, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Lucy Allewelt had a prominent part for many years 
in the Primary Department 
of the Sunday school. She 
also assisted in the three 
vacation Bible schools that 
were conducted successfully. 
She also was an active mem- 
ber of the Ladies' Aid. 
Although she died several 
years ago the church feels 
the loss and her memory 
lingers with us. 

The teacher training 
class was quite active from 
1917 to 1923. Then again in 
1934 to 1935 there was a 
class. Nine persons com- 
pleted the entire courses 
offered by the Sunday school 
board at Elgin. Others took 
certain books or portions of 
the courses. J. E. Myers and 
Milton Baugher have taught 
these courses. 

The Christian Workers' 
have also been an active 
organization of the church. 

According to the church clerk's records the organization was 
effected on October 7, 1914, for three months, with J. J. Price, 
President; Lucy Shriver, Vice President; Bruce Whitmore, 
Secretary. Three months later, January 6, 1915, the organiza- 
tion was effected for one year with J. J. Price, President; B. C. 
Whitmore, Vice President; and Lucy Shriver, Secretary- 
Treasurer. On January 1, 1919, a committee consisting of 
Charles Huff and J. E. Myers prepared a Christian Workers' 
Constitution which was accepted by the church. This gave 
the duties of officers, length of term, and regulations for their 
elections. About a year ago a B.Y.P.D. was organized to com- 
bine the work of Christian Workers' and Young People's 
Department. The Christian Workers' topics are followed for 
three Sunday evenings and the last Sunday evening of the 




Elder B. F. Kline and Wife 
Former Supt. of Children's Home. 



120 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



,;,-..-. -■--.;.-'-;■ 





Presiding Elder J. E. Myers & Wife Elder J. M. Stouffer and Wife 

month a special program is given instead of the regular 
preaching service. 

The church building has undergone considerable change 
from December 1940 to April 1941. A Sunday school annex 
with a basement and two stories containing four Sunday 
school rooms has been added to the rear of the church. A 
balcony containing about forty-five chairs has been added to 
the main auditorium which also is used for Sunday school 
classes. A tower has been placed to the left at the front of 
the main building. The interior of the main auditorium has 




Minister E. E. Baugher and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



121 



been repainted and the benches refinished. A new lighting 
system and a new heating plant have been installed. A new 
carpet is being placed in the aisles and on the pulpit. The 
entire cost will be about $10,000. 

The present officials of the congregation are : J. E. Myers, 
elder in charge ; J. M. Stauffer, elder; E. E. Baugher, minister; 
deacons : Edward Hetrick, Charles Laugerman, Charles Huff, 
Daniel Forry, George Shriver, Claude Miller, Charles Hilbert, 
Irvin Hostetter. Presiding elders of this church follow: J. A. 
Long, under Mission Board ; Orville Long, 1902-1903 ; William 
Anthony, 1903-1904; C. L, Pfoutz, 1904-1906; D. H. Baker, 
1906-1909; E. S. Miller, 1909-1912; William H. Miller, 1912- 
1915; Daniel Bowser, 1915-1923; John W. Myer, 1923-1924; 
C. L. Baker, 1924-1935 ; J. E. Myers, 1935-present. 

The number of members is 228. 



HUNTSDALE CONGREGATION 



In 1836 the church of Cumberland County was divided 
into two sections known as Upper and Lower Cumberland. 
The first minister and first ordained elder was Christopher 
Johnson who had moved from Maryland to Dickinson township 
in 1828. 

In 1836 David Ecker came from Adams County and was 

chosen second elder. 

The burying ground 
was deeded to the brethren 
on November 25th, 1850, by 
Elder Christopher Johnson. 
The deed was entered March 
10th, 1850. The trustees 
were Samuel Johnson, 
Daniel Keller and David 
Demuth. In 1864, Brethren 
Martin Lehman, Daniel 
Shenk, and Peter Garver 
were elected trustees. 

The church bought from 
Samuel Cockley one acre 
and eighty perches joining 
the west side of the grave- 
yard on February 18th, 
1864. The deed being enter- 
ed March 26th, 1864. The 
church met in council at the 
home of Brother Henry 
Gibbel and agreed to build a 
Elder Daniel Keller brick meeting house. The 




122 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

brick was hauled from the Joseph Widder homestead in Perm 
township. Henry Gibble, Martin Shenk and Jacob Hollinger 
were chosen building committee. It was arranged to build 
the house 70 feet long and 40 feet wide, with basement divided 
in three parts. The land purchased from Samuel Cockley at 
$175 per acre amounted to $262.50; the cost of the meeting 
house was $2,926.30, making a total of $3,188.80. A stable 




Elder Jacob Hollinger and Wife, Mary Ann 



was built at a cost of $268.71. Brother Daniel Keller was 
treasurer at this time. 

"We, the undersigned, for the building, agree to pay to 
the said Daniel Keller, treasurer, on demand each one the 
sum he or she has set opposite his or her name. August the 
third in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-three; John Coover, $100.00; Daniel Hollinger, $100.00; 
Daniel Keller, $300.00; Samuel Miller, $50.00; Allen Mohler, 
$30.00; David Ecker, $20.00; Joseph Sollenberger, $20.00; 
George Hollinger, $20.00; Susannah Shaffer, $5.00; Cyrus 
Brindle, $10.00; Jacob Sollenberger, $2.00; Joseph Sollen- 
berger, $1.00; Samuel Johnson, $10.00; Martin Lehman, 
$5.00; Conrad Johnson, $10.00; Daniel Demuth, $20.00; 
Henry Shaffer, $10.00; Frovg Winddun, $50.00; Martin 
Shenk, $20.00; Ganwiz Gibbal, $25.00; Daniel Shenk, $10.00; 
Adam Hollinger, $5.00. Total, $823.00. " 

The first Love Feast was held in the new meeting house 
May 27 and 28, 1865, and from that time until now we have 
Love Feast twice a year. The first district meeting was held 
in the new meeting house in 1866. Brethren Joseph Sollen- 
berger and Daniel Keller were chosen delegates to annual 
meeting held in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. In 1867 
Brother Jacob Hollinger was chosen delegate to annual 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



123 




HUNTSDALE CHURCH 

conference. Brother Daniel Keller asked to have a clerk 
elected to keep account of all church business. Brother 
Daniel Hollinger was elected the first church clerk. 

April 17, 1897, Brother J. Edward Hollinger was elected 
Love Feast treasurer. 

The first Sabbath school in the Huntsdale house was 
organized April 25, 1881. 




Huntsdale Church in 1941 



124 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder John F. Stamy and Wife 
Active in District Work. 

Brother S. M. Stouffer was ordained to the full ministry 
May 16, 1900. The ministerial and Sunday school meeting 
was held at Huntsdale November 1 and 2, 1906. 

The first Christian Workers meeting was organized 
January 19, 1907, with Brother W. I. Sheaffer as president. 
The organization for an "Old Folks Home" on April 6, 1907, 
was as follows: Brother J. L. Williams, chairman; Noah 
Cockley, treasurer; J. Edward Hollinger, secretary. 

August 24, 1907, the church decided to create a fund to 
be used for the keeping of the Huntsdale Cemetery, in charge 
of Brother E. L. Mellinger. Brother H. K. Miller was elected 
Sunday school superintendent January 19, 1907, and held that 
office until 1924, when Brother E, L. Mellinger was elected 
superintendent, which office he held until December, 1940. 

April 3, 1909, Brother J. D. Games was elected as active 
elder for three years. 

The Sister's Aid Society organized July 31, 1909, with 
Sister Wealthy Burkholder as president. 

June 18, 1909, a joint council was held with Upper and 
Lower Cumberland at which time it was decided to build a 
church in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

July 16, 1910, Brother Noah Cockley was advanced to the 
third degree of the ministry. At this time Brother Henry Beel- 
man was elected presiding elder for one year. Ministerial and 
Sunday school meeting was held in August, 1916. Brother S. 
M. Stouffer was elected presiding elder April 8, 1911, and 
Brother J. E. Hollinger was elected Love Feast treasurer. 

Children's Aid Society organized August 9, 1913, with 
W. I. Sheaffer, president; Annie Cockley, treasurer, and 
Velva Evans, secretary. 

January 5, 1918, Brethren W. I. Sheaffer and A. A. Evans 
were ordained to the full ministry. Brother Sheaffer being 



p 




3 




a 




H*J 


>~^ 


HJ 


a- 


o 


CD 


3 


4 


«r»- 




*-* 


CLC 


CD 
P 


3 

^ 


n 




o 


rr> 


3 


Ws 


7. 


c+ 




«-h 


w 


O 


p 


►-=! 


• 




^ Qrq 


^^ 




c+ 


£d 


« • 




o 


^ CD 


$3 

fD 


o 

crq 

CD 




t- 1 


Ch 




o 


3 




CD 


£ 


■-* 


• 


w 


r 


a- 


re 


3 


CD 


p 


4 


•-s 




G- 






CO 



CD 



**■ 



^3 
CO CD 

I— 'v. 

CD 



d 

o 
► 

h 

o 

d 
o 

a 

o 

H 

H 



bd 

p H 



4 



H 
2 



ryi o 

P « 



td 
p 

o 
o 

■ • 

3 

CD 
4 



O 



p 

CO 
t— '• 

CD 

P 

CO 
«rt- 

O 



td 
o 
> 

50 

3 




126 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

elder in charge until July 25, 1925, when he passed away. 
September 17, 1925, a special council was called and Brother 
A. A. Evans was elected to fill the unexpired term of Brother 
W. 1. Sheaffer, which office he held until September 26, 1936, 
when he passed away. The Upper Cumberland District was 
divided as follows on September 17, 1925 : Huntsdale Church 
of the Brethren and Newville Church of the Brethren. 

October 8, 1936, a special council was called to elect a 
presiding elder. Brother Otho J. Hassinger was chosen. 
Brother R. M. Flohr was minister at Huntsdale at this time. 
August 25, 1937, our church elected their first pastor, Brother 
Luke K. Buffenmyer. May 22, 1939, Brother Buffenmyer 
resigned as pastor in order to attend Bethany Seminary. 

July 7, 1939, Brother O. J. Hassinger was elected pastor. 

Ministerial and Sunday school meeting was held in 
August, 1940. 

In December 1940 at council, the following church officers 
were elected : Church treasurer, Clifford I. Myers ; recording 
secretary, Mrs. John Leer; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
Velva Evans. 

The present trustees are as follows: Ralph Sheaffer, presi- 
dent; Harold Evans, secretary; Clark Line, treasurer. Sunday 
school board, John Leer, Jr., Harold Evans, Mrs. John Leer, 
Mrs. E. L. Mellinger, Mrs. O. J. Hassinger. Deacons, Harry G. 
Sheaffer, Willis Whistler, George L. Line, Edward L. 
Mellinger, John A. Leer, Ralph Richwing. Grave-yard treas- 
urer, E. L. Mellinger. Sunday school superintendent, Ralph 
Clopper ; Marlin Mellinger, secretary; John A. Leer, treasurer. 

The church membership is 130. 






LOWER CONEWAGO CONGREGATION 

The Big Congregation was divided in 1849 and named 
Lower Conewago and Upper Conewago. At the same time a 
division line was made between the two congregations. The 
boundary line was as follows: "Beginning at Millers line on 
Forge Road, thence to Kings Tavern, thence to Big Conewago 
at mouth of Beaver Creek, thence along York and Adams 
County line and state road to Abner Binders, thence along 
York and Adams County line to the Cumberland County line. 
The north boundary, York and Cumberland County line to 
the Susquehanna River, comprising the northern half of York 
County." When the Big Conewago Congregation was divided, 
there were two church buildings: Wolgamuth's built in 1844, 
and Altlands union meeting house built in 1795. Both church 
houses after the division were in the Lower Conewago 
territory. They were small houses and not equipped for 
holding Love Feasts. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



127 














S*r^ats />*T^L &C&, <2— tZ&><*-*/s60-»^ -&^t£l_^ 



<W*ul, *^ 4&rr-z^ -b&oL^ dk^Z ^T ^^f 4 / fe^l^ 




S*2*&^-* ,, &^s%y'csG\* 












11 fsi 






/J 
+7 



£, A 






Facsimilie of Vote on Division in Big Conewago and of Election of a 

"Brother at the Word" 

The Love Feasts were held in the barn on the Casper 
Markey farm near Mulberry until the first Bermudian meeting 
house was built in 1856. All Love Feasts from that time to the 
present have been held in the Bermudian meeting house. 

William Trimmer was presiding elder of Big Conewago 
at the time of the division. His residence being in Lower 
Conewago territory was the first presiding elder of the new 
congregation. Peter Dierdorff, Peter Trimmer and Joseph 
Myers were also ministers residing in Lower Conewago at the 
time of the division and preached in Lower Conewago church. 






128 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




foftMLUU s<&0UhUa^& $ju*A4AAjli 0~*^tl, / A^A /2/y^ '-^^ty- **•****- 

Outfit tf?zy**@ 

Copy of First Church Letter Received by 
Lower Conewago Congregation 

Services were held in the home of C. T. Raffensperger at 
Mulberry, Daniel Trimmer near Kralltown, and on the Casper 
Markey farm where the Love Feasts were held in addition to 
the services held in the two church buildings until the first 
Bermudian meeting house was built in the year 1856. 

First Meeting House in the New Congregation 

In the year 1856 the county surveyor surveyed from a 
larger tract, 71 perches, owned by William Harlacher, Sr. 
On the same date 123 perches were surveyed from a larger 
tract owned by Peter Trimmer. These two tracts making a 
plot of one acre and 63 perches. The same year on this plot 
the first Bermudian meeting house was built. 

The building committee was Samuel Groff, Peter Trimmer 
and C. T. Raffensperger. It was built of native sand stone on 
the site of the present building. A deed for this church 
lot was not given until four years later. A deed dated April 
18, 1860, was granted to Benjamin Hollinger, George Harbold 
and C. T. Raffensperger, deacons of Lower Conewago Congre- 
gation, by William Harlacher, Sr., and wife, and Peter 
Trimmer and wife. The amount paid for both lots to both 
parties was ninety-four dollars and thirty-four and one-fourth 
cents. 

The building committee of Bermudian meeting house 
kept a perfect record of all material and labor which amounted 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



129 



to fifteen hundred dollars. A record was also kept of the in- 
dividual subscriptions. Six solicitations were made to raise 
the amount needed. There were three hundred and twentv 
subscriptions. One hundred and eighteen dollars was the 
highest; twenty-five cents the lowest. Sixty-one of the three 
hundred and twenty subscriptions were five dollars each. 

The Present Bermudian Meeting House 

The Lower Conewago Church grew in numbers and the 
first Bermudian meeting house became too small, especially 




Bermudian Church 



on Love Feast occasion. A special council was called on the 
13th day of November, 1886, to consider the feasibility of 
building a larger meeting house. The voice of the 
church was taken and was unanimous for a new and 
larger meeting house, if the necessary funds could be raised. 
It was also decided that the seven deacons should be the 
solicitors, to see every member in the congregation and report 
to the next council, December 11, 1886. The seven deacon 
solicitors reported at this meeting, but the amount of the sub- 
scriptions was not sufficient to start the new building. It was 
then decided to make the second canvass and report on 
Christmas Day, 1886, at the Altland meeting house. From 
results of the second canvass, the new building was built the 
following year. 



130 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

The congregation decided to enlarge the church lot, and 
on March 26, 1887, a deed was granted by Elizabeth Baker 
for thirty-three and one-half perches of land for twenty-five 
dollars to the following deacons of the Lower Conewago 
Church: Benjamin Smith, Isaac King, John Wolf, George 
Firestone, and Benjamin Hollinger. The building committee 
for the second Bermudian meeting house was Emanuel 
Gochenour, President; Cornelius Mummert, Secretary; George 
Firestone, Treasurer; and Elias Hollinger, Contractor. They 
kept a perfect record of material and labor which amounted 
to two thousand five hundred fifty-three dollars and eighty- 
four cents. The first Love Feast held in the new building was 
October 6th and 7th, 1887. 

At the business meeting on March 25, 1893, a resolution 
was passed to enlarge the church lot, to give more room for 
a contemplated horse shed. A deed dated March, 1893, was 
transferred to Jacob Markey, Absolum Trimmer and Peter 
Harlacher, trustees of Bermudian meeting house, by Martin L. 
and Emma Strayer for seventy preches of land for thirty 
dollars, ($30.00). 

At a special council, January 13, 1895, it was decided to 
build a new shed on the plot of ground just purchased. It 
was to be one hundred feet in length, and width sufficient for 
horse and vehicle to enter on both sides. The shed was built 
the same year at a cost of three hundred eighty dollars and 
forty-three cents, ($380.43). 

A small plot of the church lot was laid out for a cemetery 
about the same year the first meeting house was built in 1856. 
The epitaph of the first burial is as follows : 

In memory of Samuel Groff, Born December 17, 1831, 

Died June 2, 1865, Aged 24 years, 5 months, 16 days. 

Wolgamuth Church 

The Wolgamuth Church is along the old Carlisle road, 
one and one-half miles southeast of Dillsburg. 

In 1844, Christian Wolgamuth sold to a committee, 
Benjamin Jacobs, Jacob Firestone, and Daniel Dierdorff, a 
plot of ground in Carroll township, York County, for a church 
lot and burying ground for the sum of five dollars. 

The same year a church building was erected at a cost of 
three hundred eighty-five dollars and sixty-five cents. The 
subscriptions ranged from twelve and a half cents to twenty 
dollars. The church house was remodeled in 1903 and again 
in 1938. 

Altland Meeting House 

In the year 1795, Philip Altland, of Paradise township, 
York County, Pennsylvania, sold one acre of his farm, located 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



131 




WOLGAMUTH CHURCH 



one mile southeast of the village of Bigmount, to three chosen 
trustees from three churches of that community. Jacob 
Altland, son of Philip Altland, representing the German 
Reformed Church, and John Trimmer representing the 
German Baptist Brethren. 

A large sheep skin deed dated December 25, 1795, meas- 
uring twenty-seven by twenty-nine inches containing over six- 
teen hundred words written in long hand, setting forth the 
particulars of the agreement. Five shillings was the amount 
paid for the one acre of ground. 

A house was to be erected thereon for worship in common, 
of the three religious societies and for the use of a school and 
a dwelling for the school master, also a part of this plot for 
a place to bury the dead of the above named three societies. 

Soon after the purchase of the land, a long log building 
was erected. The building faced the south. The west end 
was used for worship and a school room. The east end was 
used for the dwelling of the school master. The building was 
one and one-half story, and had two doors, one in the school 
room, the other door was in the dwelling. There were double 
doors between the school room and the dwelling. When 
occasion demanded, for worship, the doors were opened and 
part of the dwelling was used. The school room had a table 
in the center and slab seats around it, also a large stove in one 
corner. Frederick L. Asper was the teacher of this school 
for many years. 



132 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

In 1852, another plot of ground was purchased and the 
present brick building erected the next year, 1853. The old 
school was then discontinued and later converted into a dwell- 
ing for the care taker of the cemetery and meeting house. In 
the year 1880, June 13th, shortly after Sunday school was dis- 
missed in the afternoon, during a thunder storm the north 
gable was blown in and the south gable blown out. The 
building was immediately repaired. In the year 1877, Daniel 
Jacobs and wife sold to Henry Moul, Elias Berry and Jonas 
Trimmer, trustees of Altland's meeting house, forty perches 
of land for an additional hitching ground. 





Altland Meeting House 



The trustees, Daniel Jacobs, Thomas Julius and Pierce 
Stambaugh, in the year 1900 bought from William Altland 
and wife, one hundred fifty-nine perches to enlarge the 
burying ground. 

The first Sunday school at the Altland meeting house was 
organized in the year 1877, with Jacob B. Baughman as super- 
intendent, with an enrollment of one hundred thirty-three. 
Others serving as superintendents were Daniel Jacobs, George 
Henise, Jacob Trostle and Eli Oberdier. 

Services were held in the old meeting house, and the new 
building by the three above named churches. About 1896, 
the Lutheran and Reformed discontinued preaching but a 
union Sunday school was continued until about 1906. Preach- 
ing was held every two weeks by the Church of the Brethren 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 13? 

until 1920. From that date to 1939 the only services at the 
Altland Church were on funeral occasions. In 1939, the 
Young- Peoples Department of Lower Conewago began 
reviving the place. Their first meeting was a home-coming, 
the three churches above named were represented. At the 
present, there are services every third Sunday of each month 
by the Young Peoples Department of Lower Conewago, and 
by invitation, the young people of the adjoining congregations. 

Preaching services were held at the following union 
churches and school houses : Quaker meeting house near 
Wellsville, Harmony Grove union church, Meisenhelters 
school house east of Dover, Augenbaugh's school house, 
Strinestown union church, Manchester union church, Cassel's 
union church near York Haven, Wolgamuth church one and 
one-half miles southeast of Dillsburg, Altlands meeting house 
near Bigmount and the Bermudian meeting house where the 
Love Feasts were held. 

When Lower Conewago Congregation was formed from 
Big Conewago in 1849, Love Feasts were not held yearly, 
largely due to the expense involved for holding a Love Feast. 

The Following is an Itemized Statement of the 

Love Feast of 1872: 

8 one-gal. crocks apple butter @ $ .30 $ 2.40 

93 loaves of bread @ .12 11.16 

55 pounds of butter @ .20 11.00 

25 pounds of lard @ .08 2.00 

30 pies @ .12 3.60 

3 bushels of apples @ .25 .75 

15 bushels oats @ .35 5.25 

213 pounds of beef @ .09 19.17 

2 lambs @ 3.00 6.00 

2 hostlers @ 5.00 10.00 

1 bushel of wheat @ 1.70 1.70 

i ton of hay @ 10.00 10.00 

Flour 1.75 

Store bill 10.26 



Total $95.04 

The Love Feasts were usually two day feasts, Saturday 
and Sunday. 

In the early church the preaching was in Pennsylvania 
German. Later on the sermons were both English and German 
and since about 1900, the sermons have been in English. 

On Love Feast occasions the services began about ten 
o'clock the first day, the afternoon at two o'clock and an 
examination sermon at four o'clock. 

The seating to the tables for the Love Feast proper about 
six o'clock in the evening. The second day of the feast, serv- 



134 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



ices began at ten o'clock and 
lasted usually two hours, 
closing at noon. 

All the meals and horse 
feed were free. The Ber- 
mudian meeting house was 
built on the same design as 
most meeting houses, base- 
ment, first floor and second 
floor. The second floor was 
equipped with beds and 
some bedding plus cradles 
for the babies. It was di- 
vided in two parts and 
would accommodate about 
thirty-five or forty people. 
Usually two deacons and 
their wives would remain at 
the church to prepare break- 
fast for the visitors. 

Some of the Lower 
Conewago members were 
trail blazers; the Himes, 
the Wires, the Stouells and 
others. This group located in Russel County, Kansas, in the 
early seventies. Russel County lies west of the center of the 
state and was sparsely settled in those days. Following is a 
letter received from William B. Himes addressed to William 
Harbold, a deacon in Lower Conewago Church. 
The letter follows in its original composition : 




Elder Hezekiah Cook 



Bunkerhill, Russell Co., Kansas, 
April 1, 1875. 



William Harbolt 



Dear Brother: 

Your letter came to hand to day with draft for $26.35 
twenty-six dollars and thirty-five cts. now in the behalf of the 
doners. They have my heart felt thanks praying that the good 
Lord may bless them and double for the same. 

WILLIAM B. HIMES 



Now I will try to give you a faint idea of how things are 
here before we got this money. I don't think there was as 
much money as would buy one bushel of potatoes in our school 
district. At present it is reported that there are one hundred 
cases of people that have the bone skirvy in the county. The 
dockters say it is on account of not having any vegetables to 
eat. They recommend the people to get potatoes, but few can 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



135 



get them as they are two dollars per bu. here. There are three 
of us to devide the donations. I think the best we can do is to 
take a good part of this money and get potatoes to eat and 
plant. We will try and help all now. The most that is suffer- 
ing for the want of something to eat is our horses. There 
issent more then two in our district that have eny hay and no 
grain to feed of eny kind. The government is now furnishing 
the people with some rations. Dont know how long it will 
last. Now I will tell you that Sister Stouell died on the 22 
second of this month of the bone skirvy and Bro. Alfred has 
it to. That is her husband and their oldest son and also old 
Sister Stouell the mother of the one that died. She leaves four 
children behind one only one year old. There is truly a good 
bit of trouble out here now but I hope the Lord will again smile 
upon us so that we may have a good harvest. Those that have 
fall wheat out I think will have good prospects of wheat as it 
looks very nise now. I have got my spring wheat sewed. The 
wether was nise till the last few days it snowed but to day the 
snow went fast. Now I will tell you that the Brethren have 
done a heap in helping the poor. A meny a one is made glad 
by their donations. If it would not have been for the dona- 
tions we would have starved here or the best part of the 
people. Well I must close by saying I often wish I could be 
in with our dear Brethren at their meetings. Our relations 
are all well but Mrs. Wire, she is sick and not able to be out 
of bed. 

Our love to all, 

WM. B. HIMES 

Ministers of Lower Conewago 

William Trimmer — Born 1784. Presiding elder of Big 
Conewago and became first P. E. of Lower Conewago in 1849. 
Died 1870. 




Elder O. W. Cook and Wife 






<P 






«H 






• t— i 






* 






*d 






e 






03 






>> 






?H 






s 






<D 






ffi 






• 

P 






W 






m 






0> 






-a 






—— 






W 






• »v 






T3 






C 






OS 






i— ( 






■+J 


• 




i— ( 


0> 




< 


4-H 

i—i 




• 


£ 




ffi. 


■o 




• 


c 




u 


oJ 


o 






o 


Fh 


*h 


< 


0) 

X3 


bJD 


'— * 


F-l 


H 


H 


<D 


£ 


••« 




o 


*H 


0) 


O 


OX 




T3 


O 


Pi 




»i— i 


O 
►J 


WW 


bJO 

•i— • 


W3 

as 


CO 

> 


• 1— 1 






O 




Oh 






0) 

• i— i 


• i—i 


<tj 


► 


T3 


CO 


^ 


OS 


Pi 


g 


H 


3 


«3 


H 




X 


CO 


Fh 


o 


t— 1 


<D 




£ X 


t— 1 


u 

i— i 


•-3 




h 


c 




OS 

H 


• 1— 1 

'a; 




• 


• • 




d 


o 




^ 


fH 




0)^3 




^a 


s 




3 


o 




• • 


0) 




•+^> 


CO 




& 






be 






•i— i 


<4H 




O 


• .— 1 






T* 

c 




t—t 


05 






o 




o 


o 




Fh 


o 




-»j 






09 


-M 




F>H 


- 




• i— 1 


CD 




fe^ 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



137 



John Raffensperger — Born 1821. Died 1890. 

Joseph Myers — Elected a "Brother at the Word" in 1849. 

Peter Dierdorff — Died in 1886 at Goshen, Indiana. 

Peter Trimmer — Born 1808. Lived near Bermudian 
meeting house. Died 1900. 

Samuel Burkhart — Elected to the ministry in 1863. 

Emanuel Gochenour — Born 1832. Elected 1866. Pre- 
siding elder many years. Died 1910. 

Joseph Bucher — Born 1842. Elected 1869. Died 1919. 

John Harlacher — Born 1822. Died 1920. 

Hezekiah Cook — Born 1838. Elected 1882. Ordained 
1908. Presiding elder 1909 
to 1913. Died 1918. 

Daniel Trimmer — Born 
1809. Died 1873. 

William Wiley — Born 
1841. Died 1924. 

Abraham Hull — Born 
1844. Elected to the minis- 
try 1885. Ordained 1908. 
Died 1911. 

William Miller — Re- 
ceived by letter. Lives in 
Lost Creek. Daughter, Ada 
Brandt, Millerstown. 

Oliver Cook — Born 
1865. Elected 1900. Or- 
dained 1911. Presiding elder 
1913. Served 18 years. Died 
1936. 

Charles Altland — Born 
1869. Elected 1900. Or- 
dained 1918. 

Jacob Brenneman — 
Born 1861. Elected 1909. 
Died 1920. 

A. M. Brodbeck — Born 1851. Elected 1911. Died 1932. 

G. W. Harlacher— Born 1875. Elected 1913. Ordained 
1925. Presiding elder 1927 to 1930; from 1934 to present. 

H. H. Hollinger— Born 1878. Elected 1917. Died 1923. 

S. S. Sheffer — Born 1873. Elected 1918. Ordained 1925. 
Died 1939. 

K. D. Henry — Born 1879. Elected 1921. Ordained 1937. 

R. D. Cook— Born 1886. Elected 1921. Died 1934. 

Albert Cook — Born 1898. Elected 1935. 

Charles Eichelberger — Born 1893. Licensed 1940. 

Ilelvin Jacobs — Born 1908. Licensed 1940. 

The deacons serving at the present time are : D. B. King, 
J. E. Renall, Cleon Ziegler, George Sower, George King, P. E, 
Rentzel, W. E, Cook, Merle Cook, Harvey King. 




Elder S. S. Sheffer and Wife 






T3 




C 




o3 




_ 




0) 




N 




+-> 




£ 




<D 




tf 




w 




d; 




• • 




o 




Fh 




TJ 




fi 




o 




o 




<n 




OT 




aJ 




«h 




•i— i 




£ 




TJ 




fi 




03 




&J0 




C 




•i— i 


o 


tf 


1 o 




< 




bo 


H 


o 


% 


a> 


O 


O 


O 


•\ 




<D 


w 


• i— i 




£ 


o 


^3 


J 


03 


CO 

W 


0> 


> 


To 


M 


• r— ( 


> 


0) 


!> 


N 


Q 


£ 


fc 


o 


<J 


a> 




■ 


CO 


O 


2 z 


»v 


o 


«H *' 


o 


j4 


.3 «<H 


H 


*"5 


Q 




\— 1 


*1 








Renal 
Cook 




. v 




wt: 




0> 




^g 








^!td 




bo £ 

• r-H ^- 




*H 




~"S 




° c 




-+J , 




«h bo 




i2 C 




► ~hH 




£ 




5 >> 




^ CD 




> 




■+* 5h 




& 03 








<V 






<m 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 139 

First Sunday School in Lower Conewago at the 

Wolgamugh Church 1905 

Superintendents to date : Oscar Firestone, John Cook, S. S. 
Sheffer, Wayne Cook, Walter Cook, William Walls, Charles 
Eichelberger. 

First Sunday School at Bermudian 1906 

Superintendents to date : William Zeigler, William 
Hollinger, G. W. Harlacher, I. F. Hull, J. E. Renall, George 
Myers, John Hull, H. H. Hollinger, Cleon Zeigler, George 
King, Melvin Jacobs. 

Evangelists at Lower Conewago 

D. P. Saylor — His last evangelistic meeting was in Lower 
Conewago Church ; David Bonsack, Amos Kaylor, Levi Mohler, 
John M. Mohler, Joseph Lone, Silas Utz, Oville Long, James 
Sell, Samuel Stouffer, Samuel Hertzel, Spencer Beaver, B. F. 
Lightner, Adam Hollinger, Daniel Bowser, R. W. Schlosser, 
Robert Cocklin, Albert Hollinger, David Kilheffner, Trostle 
Dick, J. Edwin Jarboe, C. H. Steerman, Harrison Gipe, M. A. 
Jacobs, William Miller, William Murphy, George Lehmer, 
William Zobler, David Weaver, Jacob Myers, John Rowland, 
H. M. Snavely, Otho Hassinger. 

There are 138 members of Lower Conewago 
Congregation. 



HISTORY OF CHURCH IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY AND 
LOWER CUMBERLAND CONGREGATION 

This denomination, which occupies such a conspicuous 
place in the county had for a time, no other place of worship 
but private houses, barns and school houses. Its congrega- 
tions were served by free ministry who traveled many miles 
on horseback and later by horse and carriage. The church 
was first known as the German Baptist Church in Cumberland 
County. The congregation has been divided several times, 
the present Lower Cumberland Church being but a small part 
of what was in the beginning the German Baptist Church in 
Cumberland County. 

The following is taken from notes prepared by Elder 
Moses Miller in 1878. These notes give the names of some 
of the early families in whose homes the brethren gathered to 
worship : 

"The homes of Adam and Martin Brandt who lived in 
Monroe township. Daniel Basehoar of East Pennsboro town- 



140 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

ship, and John Cocklin of Allen township, were the first meet- 
ing places of the brethren in Cumberland County. The first 
communion services were held in the home of Adam Brandt 
about 1798. He was the first minister chosen by the church 
in this county, but for some reason did not serve in this 
capacity. 

"In 1820 John Zigler, who later moved to Ohio, and 
Michael Mishler were chosen as ministers. In 1823 Daniel 
Bollinger from Juniata County became the first ordained elder 
of the church in this section. He served the church at 
Cumberland County for 25 years and died in 1855 at Lebanon, 
Ohio, whither he had moved in 1848. In 1828 a minister 
named Christopher Johnson moved from Maryland into 
Dickinson township and took an active part in the work of the 
church. 

"In 1829 Adam Steinberger was chosen minister. 
Rudolph Mohler in 1832. Daniel Hollinger and Samuel Etter 
in 1836. Some time later Samuel Etter served as presiding 
elder of the church. His descendants have been active 
members of the church, some of them still living and serving. 
In 1841 David Horst was chosen minister. He lived on a farm 
close to where the Mohler church is located. Many meetings 
and communion services were held in his barn. 

"In 1836 the church divided into two sections, known as 
Upper Cumberland and Lower Cumberland. Baltimore turn- 
pike and Long's Gap road were the dividing line." 

In the Lower Cumberland Church Moses Miller was 
chosen minister in 1849 and served the church faithfully for 
many years. Brother Miller lived on a farm south of 
Mechanicsburg, just out of the borough limits. Many of his 
descendants still live and are active in the work of the church. 

Adam Beelman was chosen minister in 1851. David 
Niesley and Adam Bowman chosen in 1863, and Jacob 
Harnish in 1865, Three of Brother Harnish's sons reside in 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. They are Abner, John and Charley. 
Brother Abner has been active in many of the social reform 
movements of the community and an active Sunday school 
worker. 

Cyrus Brindle was chosen minister in 1868 and Benjamin 
Nickey in 1871. His family and descendants have been very 
prominent in the work of the church. He has several brothers 
who moved to the west and were ministers in the Church of 
the Brethren. The younger generation has taken an active 
part in the missionary work of the church. 

J. B. Garber moved from Huntingdon County into Lower 
Cumberland Congregation in 1874 and served as a minister 
for many years. 

Until 1855 the Lower Cumberland Congregation had no 
place of worship of its own. Services were held in the Union 
House in Mechanicsburg, the Cocklin House, about five miles 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



141 



south of Mechanicsburg, and in a meeting house in 
Shepherdstown. 

The first house of worship built by the Brethren was 
erected in 1855. This was known as the Baker House and 
was located on the Lisburn Road near Churchtown. (It was 
razed in the summer of 1935.) Same year the Miller House 
was built at Sterret's Gap. 

Miller church was so named because the land for the 
church and grave-yard was donated by Joseph Miller, a 
deacon and brother of Moses (son of Henry). 



till 4 




Mohler's Church, Lower Cumberland 



The Mohler House was erected in 1861. The land where- 
on this church stands was donated by Solomon Mohler, the 
brother of Moses Miller's wife. The church is constructed of 
brick and stone. The bricks were made just near the church 
and the stone was quarried nearby. Much of the lumber used 
in the building was cut from the site where the church now 
stands. Most of the lumber was hewn. Some of the sills 
reach from one side of the church to the other. Boiling Springs 
Church was built in 1875. 

In 1887 Henry Beelman was called to the ministry, and he 
served the Lower Cumberland Church faithfully until his 
death in 1914. 

Some time between 1882 and 1885 Daniel Landis was 
chosen a minister. Levi Mohler — 1890. He lived and served 
in this congregation the remainder of his life with the excep- 
tion of a few years when he lived in the eastern district of 
Pennsylvania. While there he was ordained to the eldership. 



142 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Brother Mohler held many evangelistic meetings in the 
southern and eastern districts of Pennsylvania. 

Brother J. M. Mohler moved from Lewistown, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Mechanicsburg about 1910 and was a very out- 
standing minister in the work of the church here. George H. 
Lehmer was called to the ministry in 1898. He served the 
church here faithfully for some years, after which he moved 
to California, where he continued faithful to his calling until 
his death in 1925. 

Adam Hollinger and William Miller were called to the 
ministry about 1900. Isaac Barto moved into the Lower 
Cumberland Congregation about 1898. He served as 
presiding elder for a number of years. 




Elder Wm. Murphy and Wife 



William Murphy was called to the ministry in 1903. He 
served as presiding elder for several years. Jacob Miller and 
Jacob Trimmer were called to the ministry in 1908. About 
1910 the Carlisle church was organized into a separate 
congregation. Brother Trimmer served Lower Cumberland 
until this time. Jacob Miller served until 1926, when the 
Dunkard Brethren formed a separate organization. He 
became their elder. 

Ira Hart was called to the ministry in 1910. Walter 
Cocklin was called to the ministry in 1914. He is the son-in- 
law of Levi Mohler. 

Isaiah Johnson moved from Somerset County into this con- 
gregation in 1912 and was active in the ministry until moving 
to Florida in 1926. His son-in-law, Lewis Lininger, was 
elected to the ministry in 1918. He also moved to Florida, 
where he continues in active work. 

John Herschman was called to the ministry in 1916. 
Brother Herschman was an active minister and served the 
church faithfully until he moved to Elizabethtown, Pennsyl- 



4 



r\V 






Q, 






■Q> 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 143 

vania, where he continues in the work. Brother Herschman 
has been back many times and has held some very interesting 
and successful evangelistic meetings. Some of the younger 
members of the church have been led to Christ through his 
efforts. 

William Kulp moved from Ephrata into Lower 
Cumberland and then to Western Pennsylvania. Ephriam 
Hertzler was called to the ministry in 1921. He is now pastor 
at Marion, Ohio. Robert Cocklin was called to ministry in 
1925. He is the son of Walter Cocklin and grandson of Levi 
Mohler. He is now pastor of the Perry and Ridge 
Congregations. 

In 1926 the Mechanicsburg church was organized, the 
line being one mile each direction form the square. All mem- 
bers living in Mechanicsburg who wished to hold their mem- 
bership in Lower Cumberland Congregation were granted the 
privilege. The same year the Dunkard Brethren organized 
and almost all of the officials joined with them. For a short 
time the Lower Cumberland Church was disorganized and 
cared for by the District Ministerial Board, who reorganized 
it September 26th, 1926. 

On above date Otho J. Hassinger and Henry L. Miller 
were chosen ministers. Brother Hassinger served for a period 
of eight years, until the Boiling Springs Congregation was 
organized, after which he served the church there. He is now 
pastor of the Huntsdale Congregation. Henry Miller is still 
serving the Lower Cumberland Congregation. 

Robert Ditmer was called to the ministry in 1929. He 
now has charge of the mission church at Van Dyke. 

On September 27, 1934, the Lower Cumberland Congre- 
gation was again divided and the Boiling Springs Congrega- 
tion was organized from the southern part. 

Harold Kettering was called to the ministry in 1936. He 
is now in college. The deacons are : Wm. Stetler, Frank 
Saphora, Frank Britton, Charles Ditmer, Charles Armstrong, 
and Ervin Holtry. 

The present membership is 51. 



LOST CREEK CONGREGATION 

The first Bunkertown church was built in 1838 on a lot 
of ground donated by Brother John Shellenberger, whose 
father, John Shellenberger, came from Geneva, Switzerland, 
in the ship "Friendship" in 1754, with his wife and children, 
and made their way up the Susquehanna River to Liverpool. 
They came up the Mahantongo Creek to where Richfield now 
stands about 1772, but in 1780, went to what is now 
Bunkertown and purchased a tract of land from James Martin 



144 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 







:-.-.\\-"-.'.\ : ■ >'v%> -"■'-"-■- - ''-->"■>>, 



Good Will Church, Lost Creek Congregation, Bunkertown 

on which tract Bunkertown and the Bunkertown Church, built 
in 1838, now stand. The congregation was organized in 1790. 

When he was asked what he wanted for the lot for the 
church, he said, "Nothing but their good will/' hence the 
name, the Goodwill Meeting House. 

John Shellenberger, the immigrant, had three sons, John, 
Peter, and David, all members of the "Dunker" church. Peter 
and David Shellenberger were among the early ministers of 
the Lost Creek Congregation, and Peter Shellenberger 




Elder George Strawser and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



145 



preached for the Kishocoquillis brethren occasionally, as his 
sister was married to Samuel Myers of that congregation. 

David Shellenberger visited the Buffalo Valley brethren 
and preached for them on various occasions. 

The Old Bunkertown Church served the members as a 
meeting house until 1891, when the present house was built. 
The following elders and ministers served the Lost Creek 
Congregation: Elders: Solomon Seiber, Andrew Bashore, 
Christian G. Winey, George Strawser, John E. Rowland, C. E. 




Smith Homestead 

Now the home of Edwin Strawser, son of Elder Geo. Strawser, where 

first Love Feast was held. 



Grapes, and J. A. Buffenmyer; ministers: Peter Shellenberger, 
David Shellenberger, William Kauffman, Christian Myers, 
George Meyers, Isaac Barto, William Cherry, Daniel Long, 
Ezra Smith, Elias Landis, Solomon Kauffman, Joseph Auker, 
Spencer Beaver, Peter Shelley, Cochran Frymoyer, William 
Zimmerman, Jacob O. Smith. 

These ministers served our congregation without financial 
support. In 1916 it was thought best to secure a pastor who 
could spend his entire time serving the congregation, and 
that he should be supported by the congregation. 

Our first pastor was Brother John E. Rowland, who served 
our congregation for about eight years. He was succeeded 
by Brother C. E. Grapes, who served from 1924 to 1932. 



146 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder John E. Rowland and Wife 



In 1933 Brother J. A. Buffenmyer was elected as our 
pastor and elder. His work here terminated April, 1941. 

The first Sunday school in our locality was organized by 
Brother J. L. Beers, and on account of some opposition, was 
conducted in the old Mount Pleasant school house, until finally 
the opposition waned and he was asked to conduct the Sunday 
school in the Good Will meeting house. 

The Free Spring meeting house was built 1863. The lot 
for the Free Spring house was donated by Brother David 
Bashore. 

The brethren held services in the old school house at 
Richfield for years, until in 1906 the church was built on land 
formerly owned by Christian Shellenberger. 

Over half the money needed to build the church was 
donated by Sister Annie Zieders. The balance was raised by 
subscription. Brother Abram Benner was one of the early 




Elder C. E. Grapes and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



147 




Elder J. A. Buffenmyer and Wife 

deacons at Richfield, and Brother Elias Landis was the resident 
minister. 

The Oriental meeting house was built in 1888 on a lot of 
ground secured from Frederic Meiser. Elder Elias Landis had 
charge of the building of the church, and Brother Joseph 
Auker placed the seats and pulpit. The Sunday school was 
organized at this church in 1890. Elder George Strawser was 
the resident minister and did much to build up the church at 




Oriental Church 



148 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Oriental. At present the 35 members are under the pastoral 
care of the Bunkertown pastor. 

Two Annual Meetings were held in the bounds of the Lost 
Creek Congregation. The first was held at Evendale on the 
Gearhart farm in 1833. Most of the members attending this 
meeting came on horse-back, and while at the meeting turned 
their horses into pasture. It was said there were more than 
a hundred horses used to bring the members to this meeting. 

In 1885, an Annual Meeting was held near Mexico, 
Juniata County, on the farm of Brother Michael Bashore. 
Many of our members remember of this meeting. 



: 

f 




Free Spring Church 



The Lost Creek Congregation licensed in 1935, and 
ordained in 1936, Luke Buffenmeyer, son of the pastor, to the 
ministry. 

In December, 1939, Mrs. J. A. Buffenmeyer, wife of the 
pastor, was licensed, and ordained to the ministry in 1940. 
Elder C. E. Grapes was in charge of the ordination. 

During Brother Buffenmyer's pastorate the congregation 
and friends installed memorial windows, new seats, a floor 
covering, painted the inside of the church and the wood work 
outside at Bunkertown. 

The Lost Creek Congregation is a large territory, com- 
prised of all of Juniata County east of the Juniata River, the 
eastern end of Perry County, and the southwestern part of 
Snyder County. This church is somewhat isolated from the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 149 



:# : -;i;i : &^ 



■ ■ ■ ■;.■: :■:■;■, 



Richfield Church 



mam part of southern Pennsylvania, but from its history has 
been active in the Lord's Work down through the years. 

Minister Ira D. Brandt moved into the Lost Creek 
Congregation m June, 1941. H. D. Emmert became pastor in 
October, 1941. 

The present membership is 453. 



THE MARSH CREEK CONGREGATION 

In the year 1790 David Pfoutz moved from the State of 
Maryland to locate on the banks of Marsh Creek, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there erected a fulling mill on a large tract of land. 
On part of this tract, donated by him, was built, and still 
stands, the Marsh Creek Church of the Brethren. 

The church was organized in the year 1805, David Pfoutz 
being the first resident minister and first elder, which office 
he held until his death in 1849. On same date Jacob Sherfy 
was elected to the deaconship. Probably twelve would have 
comprised the membership. From the time of organization 
until 1830, when the present church was built, they 
worshipped in their homes. 

At the present we have church houses at Marsh Creek, 
Friends Grove and Gettysburg. The Friends Grove house was 
built by the Society of Friends and leased by the brethren for 
fifty years at the expiration of which time they bought it. 
The lease was made some time after 1838. Services were held 



150 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Marsh Creek Church of the Brethren 



there until 1935. Recently interest at this place has been 
revived and church services and Sunday school are held 
regularly. 

The Gettysburg church was formerly a frame house which 
was built three miles south of Gettysburg by another denomi- 
nation. In 1904 it was bought by the brethren who moved it 
to Gettysburg and brick cased it. 

In the year 1813 Michael Slothour came to the congrega- 
tion as minister, and labored in that capacity until 1834, when 
he was called from labor to reward. 

In the year 1830, David Ecker and John Pfoutz were 
elected to the ministry. John Pfoutz, not feeling able to fill 
the call, was chosen deacon, and on the same date Samuel 
Slothour and David Bosserman were elected deacons. 

On August 28, 1836, David Bosserman was elected to the 
ministry. 

On August 27, 1841, Daniel Benner was elected to the 
ministry, and Joseph Kittinger and Samuel Baer were elected 

deacons. 

On May 23, 1845, Henry Bucher (grandfather of C. F. 
Bucher, of Piney Creek, Maryland) was elected to the 
ministry. 

In December, 1845, Michael Bushman was elected to the 

ministry. 

On February 8, 1851, Jacob D. Trostle was elected to the 

ministry. 

On October 4, 1851, Joseph Sherfy and Jacob Diehl were 

elected as deacons. 






Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 151 

On May 29, 1853, Joseph Sherfy was elected to the 
ministry, and Jeremiah Sheets as deacon. 

On November 12, 1854, H. G. Koser and Samuel Hoff 
were elected deacons. 

In the year 1857 Isaac Bucher moved in as a deacon. 

In 1861 David Blocher moved in as a deacon. 

On May 4, 1863, David Blocher was elected to the 
ministry. 

On November 12, 1863, C. L. Pfoutz and John Trostle 
were elected deacons. 

On August 12, 1869, Ephriam Deardorff was elected 
deacon. 

On November 10, 1870, Isaac Pfoutz was elected deacon. 
On September 21, 1872, C. L. Pfoutz was elected to the 
ministry. 

On May 24, 1873, B. F. Kettinger was elected deacon. 

On May 11, 1878, John Trostle was elected to the 
ministry. 

On November 9, 1878, J. H. Bosserman was elected 
deacon. 

On November 8, 1884, Cornelius Weaver was elected 
deacon. 

On August 4, 1886, B. F. Kittinger was elected to the 
ministry, and J. O. Blocher and J. D. W. Deardorff were 
elected deacons. 

On May 18, 1888, Uriah Stremel was elected deacon. 
On October 29, 1892, A. D. Taylor was elected deacon. 
On August 11, 1894, B. F. Lightner was elected deacon. 
On November 13, 1897, E, K. Leatherman was elected to 
the ministry. 

On April 7, 1900, B. F. Lightner was elected to the minis- 
try and Levi Bushman and Levi J. Diehl were elected deacons. 

On August 9, 1903, L. H. Warren and H. W. Weaver were 
elected deacons. L. H. Warren declined to serve. The vote 
of the church was again taken, the lot falling on A. E. Harnish 
who with H. W. Weaver was installed. 

On August 13, 1920, W. B. Jacobs and S. E. Kline were 
elected deacons. 

On March 29, 1913, Ed. Wolfe and John Weaver were 
elected deacons. 

On May 6, 1916, Archie Hollinger was elected to the 
ministry. 

On April 11, 1923, Jacob Mauss and M. L. Keppner were 
elected deacons. 

On April 11, 1925, B. F. Kline was licensed to preach. 

On August 22, 1925, John Myers was elected as deacon. 

On August 13, 1927, Frank Kline and wife were installed 
in the ministry. 



152 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 





■ 



John M. Myers and Wife 

On August 13, 1927, Frank Mauss was licensed to preach 
for one year, on August 18, 1928, he was installed into the 

ministry. 

On April 27, 1929, Elder Charles Flohr and wife 

presented certificate of membership. 

On July 20, 1930, Galen Brindle was elected a deacon. 
In 1935, Roy Leatherman and John Wineman were 

elected deacons. 

On February 7, 1937, W. A. Keeney and John Myers 
were licensed to preach. Both were installed November 28, 

1937. 

On September 10, 1938, 
Frank Miller and Paul Kline 
were elected deacons. 

On September 9, 1939, 
Ray Ogburn and Harry Har- 
man were elected deacons. 



The Elders 

David Pfoutz was or- 
dained as elder in 1821 and 
was elder of the church until 
his death in 1849. 

David Bosserman was 
ordained elder in 1848 and 
was elder until his death, 
March 29, 1880. 

On November 8, 1881, 
Joseph Sherfy was ordained 
as elder and had charge of 
the church until his death on 
October 4, 1882. 




W. A. Keeney and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



153 



C. L. Pfoutz was or- 
dained August 14, 1886, 
and was elder for thirty- 
three years. Realizing his 
age he asked the church to 
relieve him, and in tears the 
church reluctantly granted 
his request. He passed over 
to the Church Triumphant 
at the age of 86 years, two 
months, 17 days. 

Elder Albert Hollinger 
was elder from 1917 to 1921. 

H. J. Brindle was elder 
from 1921 to 1923. 

W. G. Group is elder at 
present. Elected April 11, 
1923. 

D. B. Wineman moved 
in as elder in 1908. Moved 
out in 1921. 

H. J. Brindle moved in 
as elder in 1914. Moved out 
in 1923. 




Elder W. G. Group and Wife 



Ordinations 

David Pfoutz 1821 

David Bosserman 1848 

Joseph Sherfy 1881 

C. Li. Pfoutz 1886 

J. D. W. Deardorfif 1901 

D. B. Wineman 1918 

B. F. Lightner 1918 




Elder B. F. Lightner and Wife 



154 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

The ministers are : B. F. Lightner, Gettysburg ; Chas. G. 
Flohr, Fairfield; W. N. Zobler, 457 West Middle Street, 
Gettysburg; J. G. Miller, Route 3, Gettysburg; W. A. Keeney, 
51 East Stevens Street, Gettysburg; W. C. Hanawalt, Route 3, 
Gettysburg; John Myers, Fairfield. 

Deacons are : John Weaver, M. V. Kepner, Roy 
Leatherman, Frank Miller, Ray Ogburn, and Harry Harman. 

Sunday school is held at each of the three houses each 
Sunday morning. The first Sunday school at the Marsh Creek 
Church was a summer school in 1878 or 1879. It was reorgan- 
ized in April, 1894, with B. F. Lightner superintendent and 
J. O. Blocker assistant. 

The present Sunday school officers are: Marsh Creek, 
Lawrence Hartman; Friends Grove, E. M. Wolf; Gettysburg, 
Charles D. Weaver. 

The present membership is 193. 



THE MECHANICSBURG CONGREGATION 

The present congregation of the Mechanicsburg Church 
of the Brethren was originally part of the Lower Cumberland 
Church. In the year 1925 a number of the members in 
Mechanicsburg asked for the privilege of having a pastor, but 
this request was not granted. Later, a petition signed by more 
than 50 members in good standing was prepared and sent to 
the District Meeting in October, 1925. 

A committee was appointed by the District Meeting, con- 
sisting of Elders Edward Miller, Aaron Baugher, and H. M. 
Stover. On February 24, 1926, this committee came to a spe- 
cial meeting of the Lower Cumberland Church. At this meet- 
ing, the committee gave everyone a chance to present reasons 
why the petition should or should not be granted. After de- 
liberation on the information received, the committee decided 
that for the good of the cause a division should be made. 

The committee designated that the official board, consist- 
ing of 22 members, should take charge of the division. 
Accordingly, about ten days later, the board met in 
Mechanicsburg and arranged for the separation. At this 
meeting a plan was formed and later presented at the regular 
council meeting for ratification. The plan carried with a vote 
of three to one. 

On May 8, 1926, the committee appointed by the district, 
again came to Mechanicsburg to organize the first Church of 
the Brethren in Mechanicsburg. The results of the organiza- 
tion were as follows: Elder, Charles Steerman; Secretary, 
Moses Markey; Treasurer, D. K. Miller; and Willis Brindle 
and G. H. Arbegast, both deacons under the former 
organization. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



155 




Church and Parsonage, Mechanicsburg 



Several months later, Wm. Meals and D. K. Miller were 
elected to the office of deacon and about two years later Wm. 
Kurtz was elected. Brother Charles Steerman was selected as 
the pastor, in which capacity 
he served for about two 
years. 

The next pastor was 
Brother Jesse Whitacre, who 
served as both pastor and 
elder for a period of two and 
one-half years. He was suc- 
ceeded by Brother Joseph 
Rittenhouse who served as 
pastor for nearly three 
years. During his pastorate, 
Brother Clarence Sollen- 
berger, of Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania, served as elder. 
Brother John Rowland be- 
came the next pastor and 
elder, in which capacity he 
served until 1940. In 1941 
Elder J. Lloyd Nedrow, of 
Sipesville, Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania, became 

pastor. Elder J. Lloyd Nedrow, Pastor 




156 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

At the time of reorganization, the membership was 60. 
The membership in 1941 is 81. 

During the pastorate of Brother Jesse Whitacre, in 1921, 
a parsonage was erected on the church property. 

The church activities consist of preaching services every 
Sunday morning and evening. A Sunday school, Christian 
Workers' meeting, a Women's Work organization, Ladies' Aid 
Society, and a mid-week prayer meeting. The home and 
foreign missions are supported. Representatives are sent to 
the District Meeting. 



MOUNT OLIVET CONGREGATION 

The history of the Mount Olivet Church goes back for 
three score years or more prior to the date of this writing, 
although the organized church has been in existence only since 
1915. In the day when there were no church houses in the 
community, the Brethren ministers, riding their circuit, held 
services in houses and barns. When Lower Cumberland was 
organized into a congregation, the territory around 
Duncannon and Newport was included. It was decided to put 
up a house of worship at Duncannon, and an annual Love Feast 
was held there each year for the members of that section. 
Some ministers who served at these points were : Elders Daniel 
Landis, Isaac Barto, Henry Beelman, Levi Mohler, George 
Lehmer, William Murphy, Adam Hollinger, and William 
Miller. 

Brother John Hammaker was deacon at Duncannon, and 
Brethren John Gross and John Gabel were deacons at 
Newport. In the year 1905 Lower Cumberland, having felt 
for some time that it was becoming too great a burden to keep 
up the appointments, asked the District Mission Board to take 
up the work. In 1906 the Mission Board had Brother William 
Miller move to Duncannon to take charge of the church, and 
shared the expense with the Lower Cumberland Congregation. 
Brother Miller also had charge of the mission at New Buffalo 
where the Mission Board had purchased a meeting house from 
the Methodist people. It was the material of this church 
which was later used in the construction of the Mount Olivet 
church building. Brother Miller did not remain long at 
Duncannon, but left to become pastor of the Hanover Church 
and in the succeeding years the appointments were filled by 
the ministers of the district. Because of the lack of progress 
of the work in and about Duncannon the church building was 
sold in 1912 to the members of the Episcopal faith. In 
January 13, 1913, Brother William Miller, employed by the 
Mission Board of the Southern District, began his missionary 
labors at Newport, now known as Mount Olivet. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



157 



The first services were held in the Mount Fairview school 
house across the road from the present church building. 
There were only a few resident members : John Gabel, Sisters 
Henrietta Potter, Susie Flurie, and Mrs. James Black. The 
devoutness of these aged pilgrims meant much in reviving 
and re-establishing the Church of the Brethren in this 
community. During this year of 1913 there were ten acces- 
sions to the church and from this grew the idea of the need 
for a house of worship. 

Brother Stroup, one of the converts, offered a plot of 
ground, free of charge, if the Mission Board would put a 



: -/ ; : v .- :■:'.■:::■ 




*mc 1* 



Mount Olivet Church 






church building upon it. Since there were no services being 
held at New Buffalo, they decided to bring the material of that 
building and rebuild near Newport. The building was torn 
down and removed almost free of charge. Many helped in 
this work of transferring the material to Mount Olivet. 
Brother Solomon McNaughton deserves special mention be- 
cause of his untiring efforts in hauling by wagon the lumber 
from the New Buffalo church, the distance being fifteen miles 
one way. Ground was broken for the building on December 
25, 1913, and was finished for dedication January 31, 1915, 
free of debt. Brother H. J. Shellenberger, of Juniata County, 
was in charge of the building and the total cost was 
$946.44. Brother J. A. Long preached the dedicatory 
sermon. 



158 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

When Brother Miller's health failed, Brother J. E. 
Rowland had charge of the work from June, 1914, to August, 
1915, when Brother C. H. Steerman took up the work. By 
1916 there were twenty-five resident members, so the Mission 
Board decided to form a new congregation. Elders present 
for the organization, November 4, 1916, were Brethren J. A. 
Long and C. L, Baker. Mount Olivet was the name given to 
the newly formed congregation because of its location on a 
hill. The boundary line was to be as follows : Newport, up 
the river to Thompsontown ; thence southwest with county 
line to Ickesburg; thence to Loysville and along Sherman's 
Valley Railroad to Bloomfield included; thence along state 
road to Newport. Through the courtesy of the Lost Creek 
Congregation, the members living along the Juniata River 
from Newport along the state road were granted the privilege 
of holding their membership at Mount Olivet since this was 
the nearest point. The following organization was effected at 
this meeting: Elder, C. L. Baker; Clerk, Sister Elizabeth 
Strawser; Treasurer, Solomon McNaughton. Brother and 
Sister S. M. Kipp and Brother Walter Brandt were chosen as 




Elder Earl S. Kipp, Pastor 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 159 

the first deacons. Love Feast was held the day following: the 
organization. 

These were days when it took effort to get to church serv- 
ices and most of the folks walked while some boated across 
the Juniata River and walked from there to the church. 
During these early years the church grew slowly and the 
charter members passed away one by one. As this is written, 
one member survives, Brother John Gabel, an aged man now 
living in Juniata County. 

Brother William Miller again took up the work from 
1919 to 1920. Brother John Hershman, of Mechanicsburg, be- 
came pastor in 1920 and served until 1926. During this time 
of service Brethren Earl Kipp and Ira Brandt were installed 
into the ministry, and Brethren William Burd and William 
Shuman were called to the office of deacon. 

Brother Trostle Dick, of Blain, served from 1926 to 1928, 
after which Brother Earl Kipp, resident minister, took charge 
and continues until the present time. In 1928 Brother Edwin 
Rhoades was installed as deacon. In 1935 Brother Chester E. 
Shuler was called to a similar responsibility. In this same 
year of 1935, our beloved elder, Brother C. L. Baker passed 
away after having served continuously as elder from the 
beginning of Mount Olivet as a congregation. 

Brother J. E, Rowland, of Mechanicsburg, succeeded 
Brother Baker as elder. When he moved from the district in 
August, 1940, Brother S. C. Godfrey, of Red Lion, was chosen. 
It was m council May, 1938, that Brother Earl Kipp was 
advanced to the eldership. 
Today the membership of i "«- 
the Mount Olivet Congrega- 
tion totals approximately 
fifty. 

All those whose names 
are mentioned here and m§ 

others unnamed have work- 
ed hard and each made his 
contribution to the work of m 
the Lord at Mount Olivet. BBB iiF 

We can record names, jJ^w Sf * 

dates, and facts, but only in T^^^HBL Jfl^ ' 
the Eternal World is the JA IflHf 

complete record — of hopes, 
aspirations, heartaches, 
appointments, desires, im- 
pulses, and dreams of all the 
consecrated men and women 
who have been the channels 
through which God has 

worked. All the time, effort, ^^■HHHI^lHl^l 
and money spent in the work elder Wm. H. Miller 



160 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

has been worthwhile, because many souls have been helped 
into the Kingdom and a wholesome influence has been felt in 
the neighborhood. 

May the good work continue under the guidance of the 

Spirit of Christ. 

Ministers as follows: W. H. Miller, February 2, 1913; 
J. E, Rowland, June, 1914; C. H. Steerman, 1915; W. H. 
Miller, 1919; J. R. Hershman, November, 1920; T. P. Dick, 
1927 * E S. Kipp 1928. 

Deacons as follows : S. M. Kipp, Walter Brandt, William 
Burd (deceased), Edwin Rhoades, W. C. Shuman (deceased), 
C. E. Shuler. 

Mention should be made of Brother W. H. Miller, now 
living in the Mount Olivet Congregation, who did much in get- 
ting the work started. He held two revival meetings in the 
Mount Fairview school house (across the road from the 
church) under the direction of the Mission Board of the 
Southern District and it was through his suggestion that the 
New Buffalo Church building was brought to the Mt. Olivet 
site. 



NEW FAIRVIEW CONGREGATION 

1909 — January 1, 1909, Codorus Church met in yearly 
council. A committee was appointed to locate a place to build 
a church house at the north end of the congregation. They 
reported two places as good locations. The first place was 
on the farm owned by David Markey, the second owned by 
Mr. Hovis. Committee was discharged. 

February 8, 1909, at a special council meeting it was 
moved to build a church house at the cemetery on the farm 
owned by David Markey ; also moved to appoint a committee 
of five as a building committee. The committee appointed 
consisted of Jacob Markey, George Strebig, Daniel Markey, 
David Markey, Howard Fitz. 

This church house and shedding was built at a cost ot 
$4,447.99 and was dedicated October 10, 1909. Dedicatory 
sermon was preached by Elder Joseph A. Long, of York, 
Pennsylvania. The new house was called the Fairview House. 

1921 — August 15, 1921, the Codorus Congregation met in 
special council at the Fairview House. The meeting was 
opened by Elder C. L. Baker. The matter of organizing a new 
congregation was taken up. The boundary line suggested by 
the official board was accepted by the church by 142 voting 
for and 12 against. It was decided that the new congregation 

be called New Fairview : Elders E. S. Miller, C. L. Baker, and 

Daniel Bowser held an election for a presiding elder for New 
Fairview Congregation. Elder D. Y. Brillhart was elected for 
one year. Ministers were Michael Markey and I. M. Bowser. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



161 





















X 



o 

O 
H 
05 
O 

o 
U 

Q 

w 

H 

> 

OS 
— 



r 



■^p** 



162 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

August 29, 1921, the New Fairview Congregation met in 
council for the organization of the new congregation. The 
following officers were elected : 

Clerk, Clayton F. Weaver; Treasurer, Jacob Markey; 
Trustees, Harry Markey, three years, Howard Miller, two 
years, Howard I. Fitz, one year; Reporter, Lloyd Chronister; 
Missionary Committee, I. M. Bowser, three years, Clayton 
Weaver, two years, Paul Godfrey, one year; Child Rescue Com- 
mittee, Mrs. Harry Markey, three years, Ruth Shearer, two 
years, Mrs. Howard Fitz, one year. 

1922 — January 9, 1922, New Fairview Church met m 
council at 1 P.M The meeting was opened by Elder Daniel 
Bowser. Elder Brillhart announced there would be an ordina- 
tion for an elder, and an election for a minister and for two 
deacons. Brother Michael Markey was ordained an elder. 

Elder C. L. Baker spoke of the seriousness and solemnity 
of the occasion. Brother Bowser read the qualifications of an 
elder and also of those relating to ministers. Brother Clayton 
F. Weaver was elected to the ministry. Brethren Harry 
Markey and Howard Miller were deacons. 

In the election of Sunday school officers, the count 
showed, Superintendent, Brother Howard Fitz ; Assistant, 
Brother Paul Godfrey; Secretary, Lloyd Chronister; Assistant 
Secretary and Treasurer, Lester Ulyes ; Librarians, Isaac Fitz 
and Amy Markey ; Assistant Librarians, Elsie Fahs and Lester 
Markey. 

A motion was passed that the chairman appoint auditors. 
He appointed Lloyd Chronister and David Fitz for a term of 
three years. 

October 2nd, Elder D. Y. Brillhart was re-elected 
presiding elder for three years. 

1923 — July 23, a paper was presented to the council 
asking that an elder be elected to assist Brother Brillhart. 
Request granted and Brother M. Markey was elected 
assistant. 

July, Brother Howard Fitz was re-elected trustee for 
three years. Brother Paul Godfrey was re-elected on the mis- 
sionary committee and Sister Fitz was elected on child rescue 
committee. 

1924 — January 7, Ruth Strebig, child rescue committee 
for three years ; Brother Clayton F. Weaver re-appointed on 
the missionary committee for three years; Brother Lloyd 
Chronister was re-appointed reporter; Brother Howard Miller 
was re-elected trustee, by ballot, for three years. 

1925 — September 28, New Fairview Church met in 
council at 1 P.M. Services were opened by Brother J. H. 
Keller. Elder Brillhart stated, Brother Keller was with the 
church to hold an election for a presiding elder. Brother D. Y. 
Brillhart was elected for an indefinite term. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



163 



1926 — Brother Robert Kraut was elected chorister; S. A. 
Myers, assistant. 

1927 — April 4, Elder D. Y. Brillhart appointed Paul 
Godfrey clerk for a period of two years. The church decided 
to elect trustees by ballot. Church trustees elected were 
Howard Fitz, three years; Harry Markey, two years; David 
Fitz, one year. 

December 26, in the New Fairview council it was decided 
to elect the Sunday school officers by ballot. This was 
followed by the election of the church and Sunday school 
officers: Church clerk, Paul Godfrey, three years; child rescue, 
Mary Markey, three years; missionary committee, I. M. 
Bowser, three years ; reporter, Jacob Miller ; church chorister, 
Robert S. Kraut ; assistant chorister, Paul R. Godfrey ; Sunday 
school superintendent, Howard Fitz ; assistant superintendent, 
Paul E. Godfrey ; Sunday school secretary, Lloyd Chronister ; 
assistant secretary, Jacob S. Miller; Sunday school treasurer, 
Lester Illyes. 

It was also decided that a committee of five brethren be 
elected for building purposes. They were Brethren Howard 
Miller, Harry Markey, Michael Markey, Robert Kraut, and 
Howard Fitz. A soliciting committee of three, Howard Miller, 
Robert Kraut, and David Fitz, were elected. It was moved to 
get a blue-print and start building an addition to the church 
as soon as possible. 

1928 — July 30, the New Fairview Church met in regular 
council at 7:30 P.M. The meeting was opened by Brother 
Aaron Baugher. Elder D. Y. Brillhart stated that his time 
expired as presiding elder. Brethren Aaron Baugher and S. B. 
Myer were with the church to hold an election for a presiding 
elder. Brother Michael Markey was elected for one year. 

1929 — January 7, in regular council at 1 :30 P.M. The 
meeting was opened by Elder M. A. Jacobs. Next in order 




Elder Michael Markey and Wife 




c3 



CD 



T3 

o 

c3 



O 



o 

H 









o 






bJO aS 
CPh 



W 
i— i 

> 

►— i 

a; 
O 

P 
Q 

H 

CO 



T3 eT 

CO <D 
CD -t^> 

Ph C 

~ o 

^^ 

TO lH 

-^ > 



to. ^ rjr 



CO 

co ir. 

£ '- i 



OJO a) 



0) 

o 

CD 

as 



«4H 

a) 



o .. 



o 

- 



CO 

u 

o 

o 

CD 

Ul 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 165- 

was the election of two deacons. A motion was passed to 
accept the three brethren with the three highest votes They 
were Paul E. Godfrey, David A. Fitz, and Jacob Miller. The 
elder appointed a committee to make arrangements for the 
ministerial and Sunday school meeting. He suggested, the 
seven deacons with their wives take up this matter. 

A motion was passed that a program committee of five 
be selected by the church. Committee: Elder Michael 
Markey, Howard Miller, Paul E. Godfrey, Howard H. Fitz, 
Jacob Miller. 

July 15, New Fairview Church met in regular council at 
6:45 P.M. The meeting was opened by Elder M. A. Jacobs. 
Elder Michael Markey stated that his time as presiding elder 
had expired and Elders Aaron Baugher and M. A. Jacobs held 
the election. The church re-elected Michael Markey for a 
term of three years. 

1932 — September 12, 1932, Irvin Myers and Joel Myers 
were elected deacons in New Fairview. Committee: Elder 
M. A. Jacobs and Elder S. B. Myers. 

1933 — September 26, the following Sunday school officers 
were elected: Superintendent, Jacob Miller; assistant, Paul 
Godfrey; secretary, Lloyd Chronister; assistant, Cletus 
Godfrey; treasurer, Lester Illyes; choristers, Howard Myers 
and Paul Godfrey. 

1934 — January 1, the election for church officers was as 
follows : Trustees, Harry Markey, three years, D. A. Fitz, two 
years, Jacob Miller, one year; church clerk, Paul Godfrey, 
three years; assistant church clerk, Lloyd Chronister; audi- 
tors, Lester Illyes, three years and Clarence Keeney, two years ; 
church reporter, Harry B. Markey, three years; missionary 
committee, Rodger Markey; child rescue committee, Ellen 
Emig; choristers, S. A. Myers, and R. S. Krout. 

1940 — Ministers: Elder Michael Markey, Jacob L. Miller; 
deacons: Harry Markey, Joel Myers, David Fitz, Clarence 
Keeney, Paul Lehman, Irwin Myers, Howard Miller, Lloyd 
Chronister. 

There are 310 members. 



NEWVILLE CONGREGATION 

Newville Congregation, Church of the Brethren, was 
formerly part of the Upper Cumberland Congregation. 
January 31, 1917, a special council convened at Huntsdale for 
the purpose of considering a location in Newville for a house 
of worship. A certain school property, on Broad Street, 
Newville, came on the market. After proper consideration' 
the property was purchased and remodeled as a house of wor- 
ship, financed by the Upper Cumberland Congregation. The 



166 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




The Newville Church 




house was dedicated June 25, 1917. Elder H. K. Ober, of 
Elizabethtown, preached the dedicatory sermon. In 1925 the 
Upper Cumberland Congregation was divided into two 

separate congregations, 
r -; Huntsdale on the south and 

1 Newville on the north side of 
j * the valley with the old 

Chambersburg pike being 
the dividing line. The New- 
ville Congregation was or- 
ganized October 14, 1925, 
with Elder Mitchel Stover, 
of Waynesboro, in charge. 
Brother S, M. Stouffer, of 
sacred memory, served the 
church as elder and pastor 
from November 5, 1926, 
until he was called from 
active duties here, to serve 
in a more perfect way, the 
Church Triumphant, on De- 
cember 27, 1930. Acting 
deacons at time of organiza- 
tion were Brethren John 
Gayman, and Robert Swartz, 
both deceased. Deacons 
Elder s. M. Stouffer since are Edgar Lehman. 



0m»> 




Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



167 




Pastor Cletus S. Myers 



Roy Shultz, Orville Piper, 
John Burkholder, John Co- 
hick, Ernest Scott, Henry H. 
Hackman and Charles 
Clark. 

Elder C. B. Sollenberger 
was elected pastor and elder 
April 11, 1931, and faith- 
fully served the church until 
1937. 

Brother O. J. Hassinger 
was pastor from 1937 to 
1939. In 1939 Brother Cletus 
S. Myers became pastor. 
Brother H. M. Snavely, of 
Carlisle, has been presiding 
elder since 1937. 

The following have 
served as Sunday school 
superintendents : Robert 
Schwartz, 1926-1927; Roy 

1927-1931, and 

Edgar Lehman, 

John Cohick. 



C. Shultz, 

1936-1937 

1931-1936 



1937-1940; Ernest Scott, 1940—. 

At council meeting October 30, 1940, the church pur- 
chased a parsonage at 16 East Big Spring Avenue. The 
parsonage was fully paid in 1941. 

In January, February, and March the Galahad class re- 
finished the interior of the church, and the willing workers 
raised sufficient money to pay for the indirect lights. 

The first officers of the Aid Society were: President, 
Beckie Sollenberger; Secretary, Sue Cohick; Treasurer, Bertie 
Burkholder. There are 110 members in the congregation. 



PERRY CONGREGATION 

About 1843 Elders Peter Long and John Eby, of 
Huntingdon and Cumberland Counties, respectively, and 
Jacob Swartz, a deacon, of Markelsville, Perry County (Lower 
Cumberland Congregation), located in the western part of 
Perry County, near New Germantown. These were the first 
Brethren families living in this vicinity. During the year 1843 
Elders Long and Eby organized the Perry Congregation with 
21 charter members. The first service was held in the barn of 
Brother Long in September, 1843. For almost 20 years 
preaching services were held in homes and barns. Love Feasts 
were held in barns. 



168 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

The territory originally included in this congregation was 
the western part of Juniata and Perry Counties and the north- 
ern part of Franklin County. In the late '80's they discontinued 
having preaching services in Franklin County. For some years 
the brethren of Perry and Cumberland County congregations 
alternated in preaching in the eastern part of Perry County, 
which was a part of the Lower Cumberland Congregation. At 
the present time the Perry Congregation comprises the terri- 
tory of the western parts of Juniata and Perry Counties. 

During the winter of 1870-1871 the Brethren with four 
other denominations built the Manassa union church, two and 
one-half miles south of Blain on the Newville road. The 
building committee consisted of Wm. A. Boyd (Lutheran), 
John Wilt (German Reformed), James A. Woods (Presby- 
terian), David Rowe (Methodist), Barnet Roth (German 
Baptist Brethren). When, in 1901, the church needed a new 
roof the Presbyterians (having no members in that vicinity 
then) withdrew and donated their share of the property to 
the other denominations. The Church of the Brethren 
continued to have services there once in four weeks until 

February, 1939. 

In 1873 the brethren built a church house in Juniata 
County on land donated by Elder Christian Myers which was 
called Farmer's Grove church. The Three Springs church (so 
called because of three springs near the church) was built m 
Perry County in 1876 on land donated by Samuel Book. At a 
later date his son, Edmund D., gave an additional tract of land 
to the church. The building committee for this church was 
Edmund D. Book, Benjamin F. Shumaker, Isaac Eby. Andrew 
Trostle was treasurer of the building fund. 




Three Springs Church, Perry Congregation 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvan 



ia 



169 



Resident ministers of whom we have record are John 

S b f/ P *£* LoTiS > Isaac Eb ^> E - D - c °ok, Josiah Eby, David 
Koth, William Pannebaker, Israel Wcibly, Wm I Book 
Christian Myers, Isaac Book, Abram Roher, Wm. Zimmerman' 
J. R. Beasor, Charles H. Steerman, Trostle Dick. 

Presiding elders: John Eby, 1843- : Peter Lonp- 
— -1885; Wm. Pannebaker, g ' 

1885-1892; Edmund D. 
Book, 1892-1914; Wm. H. 
Miller, 1914-1915; David A. 
Foust, 1915-1926; Mission 
Board, (C. R. Oellig), 1926- 
1927; Charles L. Baker, 
1927-1933; Samuel C. God- 
frey, 1933- __. 

Those who have served 
as pastors : Charles H. Steer- 
man, 1915-1923; Trostle P. 
Dick, 1923-1928; Charles H. 
Steerman, 1928-1936 ; Robert 
Cocklin, 1936-1941. 

Deacons : Jacob Swartz, 
Bernard Roth, Andrew 
Trostle, Benjamin F. Shu- 
maker, George Trostle, E. D. 
Book, Josiah Eby, David 
Roth, B. F. Bradfield, Israel 
Weibley, Alton J. Shumaker, 
M. D. Snyder, Daniel Has- 
singer, Samuel Yoder, Der- 
vin Shumaker, James Mc- 
Connell, Frank Saphore, 

Niles Keck, Isaac Book, John Simonton, David Gibbons Jr 
David Roth and Merle Wallace. 

Present (1940) membership of the congregation is 120. 

Sunday school at Three Springs was organized in 1877 
(at first for periods of six or nine months). The superinten- 
dents were B. Frank Bradfield, Murray D. Snyder, Alton F 
Shumaker, Jacob K. Shumaker, Frank Saphore, Daniel B 
Gutshall, Clark J. Keck, Charles Steerman, Jr., Gard M. Smith 
(re-elected September 22, 1940). 

Sunday school at Farmer's Grove — Superintendent, R. L. 
Cocklin. 




Elder Edmund D. Book 
Presiding Elder 1892-1914. 



PLEASANT HILL CONGREGATION 

Pleasant Hill Congregation was organized May 6, 1904, 
by a committee appointed at District Meeting. The committee 
consisted of C. L. Pfoutz, J. A. Long, D. Y. Brillhart The 



170 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

congregation of 130 members had been a part of Upper 
Codorus (Black Rock) Congregation. Pleasant Hill house 
was built in 1898, and was financed by free will offerings by 
members of the church and by friends in the community. 

Beaver Creek 

Beaver Creek house was built about 1865 or 1866. 
Daniel Bucher bore the greater part of the expense although 
the land was donated by Joseph Bowser. This house was 
named after a creek nearby. The house was repaired about 
1904. 

North Codorus House 

North Codorus House, named after the township in which 
it is located, was built in 1899, being financed by members of 
Pleasant Hill Congregation and kind friends of the community. 

The names of the elders since the organization are E. S. 
Miller, Moses Mummert, deceased; Emanuel Babylon, de- 
ceased ; David B. Hohf, deceased ; H. M. Baugher, deceased ; 
Samuel K. Jacobs, deceased; Henry R. Miller, G. Howard 
Danner, Jacob H. Keeny, and S. M. Lehigh. 

Ministers are Paul Newcomer and James C. Sellers. 

Deacons who have served the congregation are Daniel 
Leinart, deceased ; H. M. Baugher, deceased ; Cornelius Law, 
deceased ; S. K. Jacobs, deceased ; H. R. Miller, deceased ; John 
K Swetizer, deceased; David M. Hoover, J. W. Lucabaugh, 
F. R. Miller, Jacob H. Keeny, Moses C. Mummert, Harry C. 
Miller, Paul K. Newcomer, James C. Sellers, Nelson Hoover, 
R. M. Altland, Harry H. Mummert, Edman H. Miller, Wm. J. 
Yohe, Steward Jacobs, and David Lehigh. 

The ministers and deacons in 1941 are as follows: 
G Howard Danner, presiding elder; ministers, Elder Henry 




Elder G. Howard Danner and Wife 
Presiding Elder of Pleasant Hill Congregation. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



171 



R. Miller, Elder Jacob H. Kenney, Elder S. M. Lehigh, James 
C. Sellers, and Paul K. Newcomer; deacons, Raymond Altland, 
David M. Hoover, William J. Yohe, Moses M. Mummert 
Nelson Hoover, Edmond Miller, Steward Jacobs, David 
Lehigh. 

The membership is 326. 




THE RIDGE CONGREGATION 

The following history of the Ridge Congregation, "while 
and since it belonged to the Antietam District, ,, was con- 
tributed to the Biographical Annals of Cumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, by Elder John R. Fogelsanger 

"In the year 1752 the 
then known Conococheague 
Church was organized in 
Franklin County near Green- 
castle, by Elder Abraham 
Stouffer and George Adam 
Martin. Prior to this organ- 
ization the people were sup- 
plied with preaching by 
ministers travelling back 
and forth between German- 
town and Virginia. Elder 
Stouffer did not remain there 
more than twelve years 
when he again emigrated 
eastward to a place called 
Bermudian. Conococheague 
and Antietam are two prom- 
inent streams flowing south- 
ward in Franklin County and 
emptying into the Potomac 
River in Washington County, 
Maryland. Quite a number 
of families from various 
places settled along the An- 
tietam Some were members of the church, others joined 
alter they arrived, and in a few years it was changed from the 
Conococheague to the Antietam, by which name it is still 
known. George Adam Martin and William Stover were the 
only resident ministers for the first fifty years as far as is 
known. 

"In the year 1836 the Ridge district was organized into a 
separate body, and since that time the officers have been David 
fogelsanger, minister; William Etter and Joseph Gipe were 
chosen to the ministry. On March 20, 1849, David 


























































































































f 







Elder John Fogelsanger 



172 History Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

Fogelsanger died, after serving the church fourteen years. 
Later William Etter and Joseph Gipe were advanced in minis- 
try and in a few years William Etter was ordained to the full 
ministry. About 1852, Daniel Eckerman was elected to the 
ministry. In the year 1852 the Ridge meeting house was built 
by Jacob Fogelsanger, Rudolph Gunkle and Adam 
Shullenberger, being deacons at that time. 

"In a short time Daniel Eckerman was ordained to the 
eldership, June 7, 1858; John Newcomer and Adam 
Shoemaker were chosen deacons. On October 16, 1862, John 
Newcomer was elected to the ministry, and John Grove and 
John Reuben Fogelsanger to the office of deacon. On June 5, 
1867, John R. and David Minich Fogelsanger were elected to 
the ministry and Abram Hoch and Henry Cockhn to the 
deacon's office. In May, 1869, Jacob H. Fogelsanger was 
elected deacon. This year the Salem or Etter meeting house 
was built and dedicated November 21. 

"On May 24, 1871, John Monn was elected deacon, and 
October 16, 1872, he was elected to the ministry. Henry G. 
Etter was chosen deacon and John R. and David M. 
Fogelsanger advanced. On August 10, Elder William Etter 
died. On April 1, 1875, John Monn died, and on May 18, 
Henry Gelsinger was elected speaker ; David B. Wmeman and 
Daniel H. Miller were elected deacons. On May 27, 1879, 
D. B. Wineman was elected to the ministry and William G. 

Etter, deacon. , , 

"About 1881 or 1882 Wendel Minich Fogelsanger ana 
Harry S Neff were elected to the deacon's office; April 15, 
1891, Adam Shullenberger and H. S. Neff died. On June 1, 
1891, Jacob H. Fogelsanger died, and on the eighteenth, 
David M. Fogelsanger died. On November 8, David W. 
Allison was elected to the ministry. John R. Fogelsanger was 
ordained to the eldership and H. G. Etter made assistant elder. 
The elders present were Jacob F. Oiler and Jacob Hollmger. 
On June 2, 1892, Casper F. Hosfield and John D Games were 
elected to the ministry and Calvin Baker and William H. 
Fogelsanger to the deacon's office. On September 3, Daniel 
C Burkholder (deacon) and wife (Wealthy) were received 
on certificate from Back Creek. On March 21 1893 Daniel 
Eckerman died. On October 27, Abram Hoch died. On June 
7 1895, C. F. Hosfield and J. D. Games were advanced. In 
1897 Abram K. Hollinger (minister) and wife were received 
on certificate from Upper Cumberland On February 27, 
1902, Elder Henry G. Etter died. In March, 1904 David 
Hostetter (deacon) and wife were received by certificate. On 
May 28, John D. Games was installed assistant elder. End 
of historical sketch by Elder John R. Fogelsanger. 

The Ridge or Fogelsanger church was built in loo3 during 
Civil War days, on a piece of land given for that purpose by 
Elder David Fogelsanger. He also donated the ground lor 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



173 




Ridge (Fogelsanger) Church of the Brethren 

the adjoining cemetery which had been laid out several years 
before the church was built. Elder David Fogelsanger, along 
with two brothers, Jacob and Wendell, and sister Barbara 
not only managed the building of this church but largely 
financed it. Elder William Etter and Daniel Eckerman who 
lived in the vicinity of the Salem church, often came and 
helped with services, even though it was a long distance 
Later, Elders Henry Etter, John Fogelsanger and David 
Wineman helped with services, Elder Wineman having been 
the first applicant for baptism at this place. Elder James A. 
Sell, of Holidaysburg, Pennsylvania, when but a lad of 19 
years, preached his first sermon here at a Love Feast service 
Through the years, we find the Mellinger, Neff, Miller 
Stouffer, Mowery, Mitchell, Burkholder, Allison, Paxton! 
Hoch, and Hosfield families serving faithfully. These with 
many others helped to promote the good work. 

At the time the Fogelsanger house was built, the Salem, 
Fogelsanger and Old Stone church, near the South Mountain, 
made up the Ridge Congregation. Later on, a church building 
was erected in Shippensburg. Services at the Old Stone 
church were discontinued. In 1924 the Fogelsanger and 
Shippensburg churches became separate congregations. At 
the present time the Fogelsanger house is generally known as 
the Ridge church since the Ridge road runs nearby. 

Mrs. Wealthy A. Clark Burkholder and husband are 
buried in the graveyard at the Ridge church. 



174 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

In the year 1896 the Shippensburg church was built and 
the members in and near Shippensburg attended services at 

In 1907, B. Frank Johns was elected to the ministry and 
Joseph Burkhart was elected deacon. Samuel Fogelsanger 
was elected to the ministry in the year 1908. October 21, 
1909, Joseph Burkhart and James Slyter were elected to the 
ministry. Daniel Burkholder died in the year 1917. David 
W Allison died January 29, 1920, having served in the minis- 
try thirty-one years. David B. Wineman died in 1931, haying- 
served in the ministry fifty-two years. Wealthy Clark 
Burkholder, not only a deaconess but also a writer and pen 
minister, died in the year 1933. 

On May 7, 1926, the Ridge and Shippensburg churches 
were divided into separate congregations. Deacons elected 
at various times in the Ridge Congregation were Raymond 
Crusey, Charles Coy, William Butts and John Booz. 

Brother J. D. Reber, pastor of the Shippensburg church, 
served as part-time pastor for several years before going to 
Brooklyn church in 1935. From 1935 to 1936 Elder S. b. 
Blough, pastor of the Greencastle church, served as part-time 
pastor When Brother Olden D. Mitchell became pastor m 
Shippensburg in September, 1936, he was also part-time 
pastor at Ridge. Brother Mitchell continued to serve as part- 
time pastor two years, resigning to attend Bethany Seminary 
in Chicago. Brother Robert L. Cochlin, of Mechanicsburg, 
accepted the pastorate in 1938. . 

At the present time the presiding elder is b. A. Myers, 
pastor, Robert L. Cocklin; ministers, B. Frank Johns and 
Joseph Burkhart; deacons, William Butts, John Booz and 

Lawrence Carey. . 

The membership of the congregation is 121. 



THE SHIPPENSBURG CONGREGATION 

The history of the Shippensburg church from its begin- 
ning to the present time has been obtained from old records 
which were rather incomplete and also from reminiscences 
of the older members of the church. 

Before the Shippensburg church was built the little 
group of members living in Shippensburg numbered about 
two dozen. Sister Susan Russell was the last of that group to 
pass away in 1940. The first organized endeavor of these 
members was a series of meetings which was held in the Old 
Grace Reformed Church on Orange Street. Reverend Albert 
Hollinger preached the sermons. Mrs. Catharine Rudolph 
Beidel'then suggested that the members organize a prayer 
meeting and that the first one be held at her home, the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 175 

winn agree A r Abou £ a year later ' at the Rid ^ e ^ve Feast, 
Jacob Oiler, of Waynesboro, suggested that the Shippensburg 

members organize a Christian Endeavor. In the fall of this 
year a ministerial meeting was held at Huntsdale ; Jacob Oiler 
and some folks from this meeting stopped over in 
Shippensburg. That evening a Christian Endeavor was organ- 
ized at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Maugans. The Sunday 
school lesson was used and Edward Fogelsanger was the first 
superintendent or leader. This group now met twice a week 
Prayer meeting on Wednesday night and Christian Endeavor 
on Sunday night. The meetings were held at the homes of 
the members. 

w ™° me , of o the , countr y members attended these meetings, 
W Minich Fogelsanger being one of them. He became 
interested in the idea of building a church. Later, at a busi- 
ness meeting held in Salem, by the Ridge Congregation, it was 
decided to build a church in Shippensburg. Subscriptions 
ranged from one hundred dollars to twenty-five cents, the 
total amount received from subscriptions being $1,306 00 
w *T- h ? , f ° 1Iow , in g building committee was appointed : 
W. Minich Fogelsanger, Edward Fogelsanger, Calvin Baker, 
Casper Hosfield, and Cyrus Railing. 

* 7a o e , ™ nrcl X Iot was P urch ased from Mrs. Charles Geiger 
tor $484.60 Ground was broken for the building of the 
church in the spring of 1896. The men of the church, who 
^a v ■ , so ' hel P ed with the labor. Calvin Baker hauled 
4,000 bricks from the old Stewart kilns ; also good ground for 
the church lawn. Cyrus Railing and Casper Hosfield helped 
to do the hauling. Minich Fogelsanger was timekeeper and 
treasurer, and (in the words of one of the committee) "did 
a power of work". 

The wood work of the church was turned out at the 
planing mill of Edward Fogelsanger. The old pulpit stand 
was made and presented to the church by this brother The 
pews were patterned after those in the Hagerstown church 

The story goes that one of the good brethren who had 
charge of the bills received, kept them temporarily in the 
crown of his hat. On his way down-town, the high wind blew 
off the brother's hat, releasing the bills, and causing him con- 
siderable anxiety until he had them gathered back to safety 
again. Minich Fogelsanger, Calvin Baker, and Cyrus Railing 
purchased the trees which are on the church lot. 

The cost of the church building including the lot on which 
it stands, was between twenty-six and twenty-eight hundred 
dollars. One brother in speaking of the amount said, "You 

A n ?^-? oney was not so P lent y at tha t time." The Ladies' 
Aid did their share in raising money to help to pay the cost 
of the church. 

The brethren planned to have the church dedicated in 
December of 1896, and worked very hard to have everything 



176 History — Church of the Brethren — southern PcNinsylvania 




Shippensburg Church 

finished for this occasion. The dedicatory sermon was 
preached by W. J. Swigart, of Huntingdon. This was 
followed by a series of meetings held by Joseph Long, of York. 

A Sabbath school was organized January 3, 1897, with 
the following officers elected: Superintendent, Christian 
Fogelsanger; secretary, William A. Baker; corresponding 
secretary, William Neff; treasurer, Edward Fogelsanger; 
librarians, Frank Miller and Cora Kurtz. 

There were nine teachers, two of which were Rachel 
Vance and Edward Fogelsanger. The attendance for the first 




Deacon W. M. Fogelsanger and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



177 



Sunday, January 10, 1897, was 108. The school was held in 
the afternoon and was attended by members of other schools. 
December 26, 1897, the school re-elected the officers for the 
next year, the attendance on this day being 130. This being 
Christmas season the school was treated to apples and candy. 
The total Sunday school offerings for the year 1897 was 
$46.85. 

At this time the ministers of the church were D. W. 
Allison, Casper Hosfield, Abram Hollinger, John Games, and 
Elders John R. Fogelsanger and Henry Etter. The ministers 
took their turns in serving 
the church and received no 
salary. Later Samuel Fogel- 
sanger and Joseph Burkhart 
were elected to the ministry. 

M i n i c h Fogelsanger 
served as church treasurer 
from the time of the build- 
ing of the church until the 
year 1916. Scott Cocklin 
served during the year 1916, 
and William Fogelsanger 
served as church treasurer 
beginning with the year 
1917 and 1932, and again 
from 1936 to date. At that 
time the best singer was the 
chorister, and when he was 
absent the singing was led 
by any brother or sister who 
was able to raise the tune. 

During the years which 
lapsed between 1897 and 
1914 the church had its 
bright spots and also its dis- 
couragements, but space will 
not permit us to dwell upon 
them. In the year 1914 the 

church had the greatest revival of its history, Brother J. H. 
Cassady holding the meeting. The building was too small to 
accommodate the crowds, so William Neff procured a large 
tent which was placed on the church lot. One hundred and 
five conversions were made at this meeting. Three years later 
Reverend Cassady returned and held another successful meet- 
ing. In the year 1914 the gallery and Sunday school room were 
built in the rear of the church, and a baptistry was installed. 

The year 1916 marks the death of W. Minich Fogelsanger, 
and two years later the death of his wife, Elizabeth. 

The first pastor, Brother Ross D. Murphy took charge 
of the church in the year 1917. During his pastorate 




Deacon Wm. H. Fogelsanger 

Holder of Seal from State Sabbath 

School Association for 50 

Years of Service. 



178 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder Ross D. Murphy 
First Full Time Pastor, 1917-1919. 




Elder David Fogelsanger 

As a Young Man Before He Was a 
Member of the Church. 



the church became better 
organized. Mission study 
and teacher training classes 
were started. August 18, 
1918, a Seal Course Teacher 
Training Class of six mem- 
bers and a regular teacher 
training class of eleven 
members were graduated. 
Brother Murphy was the 
teacher of both. 

Between the years 1915 
and 1920 the average at- 
tendance at Sunday school 
increased forty-eight mem- 
bers and the average offer- 
ings increased $25.57. In 
the year 1917 the minutes of 
the Sunday school show the 
support of a native worker 
in India. This work was 
continued until 1921, when 
the Sunday school began 
paying seventy-five dollars 
per year toward the support 
of the Vayara Boys' School 
in India. This support was 
continued for ten years. 
Since 1932 twenty-five dol- 
lars per year has been sent 
to the Bulsar Mission. 

During the years 1916, 
1917, and 1918 the basement 
was remodeled to accommo- 
date Sunday school classes 
and the present heating and 
lighting system was in- 
stalled. A piano was pre- 
sented to the church by John 
M. Fogelsanger, of Phila- 
delphia. 

October 12, 1919, Rev- 
erend H. D. Emmert was in- 
stalled as our pastor and 
served until 1926. In the year 
1920, the church bought a 
parsonage on North Penn 
Street, from C. P. Hollar, for 
$4,500. From the year 1920 
to 1927 the members paid 



Congregations of Soutfiern Pennsylvania 



179 



for the parsonage. In the year 1926 they renovated the 
interior of the church. The pulpit furniture was a gift to the 
church from the children of Sister Barbara Fogelsanger. The 
panels back of the pulpit were made and placed by William H. 
Fogelsanger. 

During the year 1926 the church received for missions 
$392.17 and paid to missions $353.52. 

April 10, 1925, marks the passing away of Sister Katie E, 
Fogelsanger, wife of Jacob H. Fogelsanger, deacon. She was 
a most faithful and devoted 

member of the church, was , 

mother of eleven children, 
ten of which united with the 
Church of the Brethren. 

In March, 1927, Brother 
F. R. Zook became the pas- 
tor. Brother Zook served the 
church until June, 1928. 

May 7, 1926, the Ship- 
pensburg church became a 
separate congregation. Pre- 
siding elders were Elders E. 
J. Egan, B. F. Zug, J. M. 
Moore, Levi K. Ziegler. In 
1937 Elder S, A. Myers was 
elected presiding elder. He 
is serving at present time. 
In September of the year 
1928, Brother J. D. Reber 
became pastor. 

January 16, 19 3 2, 
marks the passing away of 
Sister Barbara Fogelsanger, 
wife of David M. Fogel- 
sanger, (minister). She was a devoted and faithful member of 
the church. October 26, 1932, marks the death of Sister 
Catharine Allison, wife of David W. Allison, (minister). 

Two important revival services were held during the pas- 
torate of Brother J. D. Reber; the first by Elder L. K. Ziegler 
and wife, and the second by Oliver H. Austin and wife. 
Reverend and Mrs. Reber did very splendid work in the young 
peoples organized endeavors of the church. 

Brother and Mrs. Reber resigned as of July 1, 1935, to 
accept the pastorate of the Brooklyn church. 

Dr. J. Linwood Eisenberg, dean of Shippensburg State 
Teachers College agreed to fill the pulpit for the summer until 
a pastor could be secured. The few months extended until 
September 1, 1936. During this year, new Brethren hymnals 
were purchased. Interior decoration and a new ceiling in the 
church were completed in the summer of 1936. 




Presiding Elder S. A. Myers & Wife 




- 

K 
H 

2 

PQ 

H 
O 

w 



^1 

^ a 

• i— i * ^3 
CO CO 

n ^ - 

~^ 0) 

co bJO 

<d ^ Jri 
gl cd <i> 

coU^ 

U ° rn 

. S 

CD • 



XJ 

c3 

bJD 
cd 

co 

•i— i 

W 

o 
o 



Oh 



CD 

bJD> 



O 

k* 

03 i — i 

CO >». 
?H O 






w 

o 
o 

p 



o 

co 
OS 

Pk 



CO 

CD 

PI 
o 

bJO g 
03 O 

CO ^ 

»— I 

CD . 

bJOg 



o 

H 
< 

H 

Q 

w 



r ffi 



o 



CO 
CD 

o 



o 

CD 

CD 



>> 

CD 

CO 

O 

03 

o 

- 

- 

• I— I 

H 



CD 



CD- 
«4H 



O 

t-3 



CDk 



e* 



££ 



bJD 



to 



•» d 
°> , 

• <-* CD> 

"Si 

CO~ tfPQ. 

o 



CD 



2 

.£cY2 



3 
bJD cd 



C bJO 



CD^ C 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 181 

Brother Olden Mitchell, of Virginia, accepted the pastor- 

* •«,*?! ' }' l 9 ° 6 ' and served both Shippensburg and Ridge 
faithfully for two years, resigning to attend Bethany Seminary 

qw i \ lnZ 0od , Elsenber g accepted the pastorate 
September 1 1938 and was installed pastor in September, 
iyo8, by Dr. W. J. Swigart, of Juniata College, a very personal 
friend Since June 1, 1939, Brother Eisenberg has been 
giving full time to the pastorate. 

Women's work organization was effected in 1939 with 
Miss Emily Stamey as president. This organization now in- 
cludes all the work of the women of the church. It is effective 
in all departments. The women's organization and men's 
organization support Richard Bollinger, son of the 
missionaries. Men's work organization assists in work that 
men can do. Regular meetings are held. 

Mrs. Iona Gutshall is president of B. Y. P. D Regular 
devotional meetings are held on Sunday evening from 
September to June. These meetings are of a forum nature. 
The Junior B. Y. P. D., in charge of Mrs. Anna Nenninger 
Wingert, is very effective. 

The present deacons are Wm. H. Fogelsanger, John 
Wonders, Charles Coy, Luther Hall, Raymond Crusey, Wm 
Neff Jeremiah Railing, Lloyd Sleighter, Samuel Burkholder, 
and Samuel Wenger. 

The present membership of the church is listed as 216. 

THE SUGAR VALLEY CONGREGATION 

Organization 

It is difficult to mark the exact beginning of a church. 
Early records are inadequate and sometimes conflicting. Most 
congregations have for their founder some outstanding char- 
acter, and thus it is with the Sugar Valley Congregation The 
So ™ e J2 ber T ? f the church was Davi d Schroyer, baptized June 
£ ' , ™ 1S mother was th e second member, baptized 
September 20, 1868. For a period of nearly ten years these 
were the only members to sow the seed of doctrine and faith 
but they must have done it well, for in a single year, 1878 
thirty-one persons were gathered into the church, mostly rela- 
tives ot David Schroyer, who served as deacon for twenty-nine 

* -, Tna or g ani z. ati on of the church took place in the autumn 
f„ 7 878, according to Peter Beaver's record of November, 
1878 m The Deacon", published at intervals at Montandon. 
It states the following : "The brethren of Buffalo Valley, Isaac 
Myers, Charles Royer, John Beaver, and Adam Beaver, organ- 
ized the brethren of Sugar Valley into a body or regular 
church by electing Brother Adam Schroyer to the ministry, 
and Brother David Schroyer to the office of deacon " 



182 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 



On January 1, 1879, Peter Beaver's record made the 
following statement: "The Sugar Valley church was placed 
upon its own footing, as far as to bear its own expenses and to 
transact such business as may pertain to its own separate 
organization and in case of uncommon difficulties. Over 
eighty members participated in the services at the Sugar 
Valley meeting. The ministers helping there were Graybill 
Myers, Elias Landis, Samuel H. Swigart, and Abram Myers. 

In the year 1880, an 
article on the minutes of the 
Buffalo Valley Congregation 
makes this statement: "June 
8, 1880. This date marks 
the date of the organization 
of the Sugar Valley church 
with about forty members. 
At this meeting Daniel 
Schroyer was elected minis- 
ter and David Schroyer 
deacon. Adam was ad- 
vanced in the ministry and 
Alfred Miller was elected 
deacon. Isaac Myers was 
appointed elder." 

There seems to be some 
conflict in the record of No- 
vember, 1878, and that of 
June 8, 1880, yet it is likely 
the earlier date, October 22, 
1878, is the time of the 
organization. Since Sugar 
Valley Congregation is a 
branch of the Buffalo Valley # 

Congregation, it was fitting that it should be organized by the 
four brethren from Buffalo Valley. The membership in- 
creased from forty to sixty in a few years. 

Three Love Feasts were held in David Schroyer's barn 
near Carroll before the church was built. This barn burned 
about 1935. The first Love Feast was held June 10, 11, 1873. 
Some of the visiting brethren from Buffalo Valley were 
present, as were also John M. Mohler, of Harrisburg, and 
Samuel W. Swigart, of Lewistown. On the second day of the 
feast, Tuesday, June 11, ten were received by baptism 
administered by Brother John Beaver, of Buffalo Valley. 

In 1878, the brethren rented the United Brethren church 
building, opposite the Emanuel Beck residence in Eastville. 
They used it as a house of worship from 1878 to 1880, and 
paid from thirty-five to fifty dollars a year for rental. It was 
then decided to build a church. 




Daniel Schroyer and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



183 



Church Building 

the SDrinroffsR^f ™ nt *™ n « one T a ^e was purchased in 
me spring ol 1881 from Solomon Lupoid for $128 Turn- 
about one-third of an acre was added Ground was broken 
and erection of the church building was begW All the 
material and the labor were donated. Monfy was never 
solicited for building purposes in a public service The 
Schroyers donated the rough timber that was S for tht 

cash mS 'He e nr P v er M' ^ *°l J 68 ** 68 ,* generous contribution in 
off?' fl enry M - Schwenk donated the planed lumber for the 
seats, floors, window boxes and weatherboards, and a sub- 







If 



^SSSSSKSte-M 





■■■'.■' .;.. 



Eastville Church, Sugar Valley Congregation 



stantial sum in cash. Nearly everv one Hvino- in «,„ 

3S Vtl?^ r 4 h r« d ' K ul Tdi"i c „ x- 

keS of „S ^ ?„ e i £ ( " 1 tT 61 ^ of the ch "* h Paid for the 
K-egs, oi nans and spikes. Labor was contributed <?n that +h Q 

raw materials might develop into the finished product Bv a 
comb ina t 1 on of materials, labor and love the buying roSto 
its present fair proportions. The entire cost of the hnflrW 
it^ ed v! n P Ct0heV > 1881 ' was $1,398.66 Ths church "f 

Clinton Cou°ntv S1 , X nH mileS f^^ ° f Loganton in ^nie 
Baptist ChuTch' AtiZT* known as the Sugar Valley German 
Baptist Ohurch. At present its value would be about $5,000 00 
Pioneer workers who traversed the intervening ZI 
tains by horseback and wagons were EliasLandTs! Isaac Myert 



184 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

George Myers, Graybill Myers, and Jacob Light of Southern 
Pennsylvania; William Howe and Andrew Spanogle, ot 
Lewistown; John Beaver, Adam Beaver Peter Beaver, Charley 
Royer and Isaac Royer, of Buffalo Valley. It is twenty-two 
miles north of the Buffalo Valley Congregation, fourteen miles 
of the distance being mountain narrows. 

The Ministry 

Brother Adam Schroyer was the first minister He was 
zealous and energetic but death cut short his work in 188o. 
The work fell upon Brother Daniel Schroyer and Brothei 
Alfred Miller. For more than thirty years they were 




Alfred Miller and Wife 

co-laborers in the ministry of the church. Brother Miller 
preached in English, but Brother Schroyer usually preached 
in German, and led the congregation in singing English and 
German hvmns. Joy in fellowship was strong when visits 
were made by the ministers of the neighboring congregation 
among whom were Isaiah Beaver, Samuel Starook, Greene 
Shively and Mervyn Mensch. 

Special mention should be made of the labors of Brother 
Greene Shively, of Millmont, Union County. Brother Shively 
served as elder of the Sugar Valley Congregation from June 
1905, to June, 1913. He has officiated at various times at 
Love Feasts, at election of ministers, at funerals when called, 
and at other special functions. Sometimes he had to walk 
the entire distance of twenty-five miles from his home to keep 

the appointment. „ , , , , , 

In June, 1907, Brother Charles A. Schwenk was elected 
to the ministry and in 1913 was ordained as elder, serving m 
that capacity to the time of this writing, 1941. Brother 
Schwenk made preparation for the work in Elizabethtown 
College and Bethany Bible School, returning to Sugar Valley 
in 1912 Brother Schwenk and wife, formerly Margaret Haas. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



185 




Left to right: B. Frank Long and Wife, Elder Chas. Schwenk and Wife 

have been instrumental in inspiring many young people to 
seek an education. Since they have come here, ten young 
people have received college degrees and eleven others have 
been students in higher institutions of learning, the congrega- 
tion numbering only forty most of this time. As there is no 
industry in the valley except teaching and farming, our con- 
gregation does not become large, as the young people go out 
to the cities for employment. 

The ministers who assist Brother Schwenk as opportunity 
affords are John Boone, B. F. Long, and Chester Schroyer. 




John Boone and Wife 



186 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

John Boone is the only resident minister at the present time 
in Sugar Valley. Brother Schwenk has made a thirty mile 
trip weekly for twenty-one years to serve the church as 
minister, elder, and Sunday school superintendent. 

The Sunday School 

The Eastville Brethren Sunday School was started about 
the time the church was organized, 1878. It was held first as 
a union Sunday school in the school house located on the 
Brother Henry Schwenk farm. Later it was held in the United 
Brethren church building which was rented by the brethren. 
In 1881 it was transferred to the new church. 

For some years the Sunday school was closed during the 
winter months. Since 1913 it has been an evergreen school. 
At first, German Bible, English Bible and English reading 
were taught. In 1904 an organ was purchased. In March, 
1932, a piano was added. Teacher training classes were con- 
ducted under Mrs. Margaret Haas Schwenk with about fifteen 
receiving diplomas. Dr. Henry K. Ober, president of 
Elizabethtown College, addressed the one graduating class, 
and Professor Ira N. McCloskey, superintendent of Clinton 
County schools, was speaker at the second graduation. 

The average attendance ranges from forty-three to fifty. 
The following have served as superintendents of the Sunday 
school : Adam Schroyer, Alfred Miller, A. E. Beck, Homer S. 
Metzger, and Charles A. Schwenk. 

Fiftieth Year Anniversary 

On October 25, 1931, the fiftieth anniversary of the 
dedication of the church was celebrated with a fitting program 
of addresses, reminiscent anecdotes, and special musical 
numbers, including congregational singing of several German 
hymns. The history of the church was compiled and read by 
Sister Ada Douty. Two charter members, Mrs. Edgar 
Schwenk and Mrs. Mary Heggenstaller, were present. Those 
members present who remembered the building of the church 
were George Schroyer, Edgar Schwenk, William and Cora 
Gerry, W. L. Smith, Mrs. Amelia Boone, and Mrs. Sophia 
Schwenk. Nine ministers, and Mrs. Vina Shellenberger, of 
Lewistown, the daughter of Brother John Mohler, pioneer 
evangelist in this section, were also present. At the close of 
the fifty year period the church had had six elders, seven 
ministers, seven deacons, and 138 members. 

Incorporation and Endowment 

The church was legally incorporated under a charter in 
1920 through the efforts of Brother Charles A. Schwenk, and 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



187 



with the assistance of Attorney T. M. Stevenson and Isaac 
Rumberger, prothonotary of Clinton County. This charter 
permits the church to hold endowments. The list of 
endowments is as follows: 

Amount Given 

Sister Rosina Schroyer $350 1917 

Sister Calisca Bodecker ___ 100 1920 

Sister Savilla Penticoff 50 1921 

Miss Ada Douty 50 1926 

Miss Emma Hawk 100 1928 

Mrs. Rosa Schwenk Royer 25 1929 

Edgar A. Schwenk 100 1935 



Elders 

Isaac Myers, 1880-1881 ; 
Charles Royer, of Buffalo 
Valley, 1881-1891; John L. 
Beaver, of Buffalo Valley, 
1891-1901; Edmund D. 
Book, of Blain, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1901-1905; Greene 
Shively, of Buffalo Valley, 
1905-1913; Charles A. 
Schwenk, of Sugar Valley, 
1913- __. 

Ministers 

Adam Schroyer, 1878- 
1883 ; Daniel Schroyer, 
1880-1912 ; Alfred Miller, 
1883-1922; Charles A, 
Schwenk (elder), 1907- __ ; 
Chester F. Schroyer, 1917- 
1938; John C. Boone, 1922- 
__ ; B. Frank Long, 1927- __. 



■:..■.: . . ■ ■.:■:■.■:■..:■/.■. . .■.:....■■. .. ■ .■ .■ . ■. . . 




Chester Schroyer 



D 



eacons 



Daniel Schroyer, 1878-1880; David Schroyer, 1880-1909 
Alfred Miller, 1880-1883; Benjamin Schwenk, 1883-1913 
Milton Schwenk, 1906-1907; Fred Heggenstaller, 1907- __ 
Russell Schwenk, (moved away), 1913-1936; Lawrence 
Bartges, 1937- __. 



Evangelists Serving Since 1904 

John M. Mohler, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, 1904; 
Levi S. Mohler, Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, 1906 ; Peter Shelley, 
Richfield, Pennsylvania, 1910; Jacob H. Richard, Maitland. 
Pennsylvania, 1912; Leo Fredericks, Switzerland, 1913; 



188 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Reuben Schroyer, Canton, Ohio, 1915; Ezra Wenger 
Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, 1920 ; Ralph W. Schlosser 
Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, 1921; Tostle Dick, Blain 
Pennsylvania, 1922 ; John Graham, Shippensburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1923; Greene Shively, Millmont, Pennsylvania, 1924 
Alvin P. Wenger, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, 1926; Earl S 
Kipp, Newport, Pennsylvania, 1927 ; John R. Snyder, Tyrone 
Pennsylvania, 1928; I. N. H. Beahm, Nokesville, Virginia 
1929 ; Charles H. Steerman, New Germantown, Pennsylvania 
1930; William C. Sweitzer, Cardwell, Virginia, 1931; Charles 
H. Steerman, New Germantown, Pennsylvania, 1932; John R 
Snyder, Tyrone, Pennsylvania, 1933 ; Harper M. Snavely 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, 1934; J. A. Buffenmyer, Bunkertown 
Pennsylvania, 1935 ; John E. Rowland, Mechanicsburg 
Pennsylvania, 1936; J. A. Buffenmyer, Bunkertown, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1937; Greene Shively, Millmont, Pennsylvania, 1938 
John R. Snyder, Tyrone, Pennsylvania, 1939 ; Joseph 
Whitacre, Lakeville, Indiana, 1940 ; H. H. Nye, Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania, 1941. 

Visits from Foreign Missionaries 

B. Mary Royer, India, 1921; E. H. Eby, India, 1926; 
Annetta C. Mow, India, 1932; Sara Shisler, Africa, 1936; 
Desmond Bittinger, Africa, 1940. 

Interesting Notes 

In 1933 a group from the Sugar Valley church made a 
pilgrimage to the Blooming Grove meeting house which is 
situated about eight miles north of Williamsport, and thirty- 
two miles from Eastville. This church was erected in 1828 by 
German Baptist Brethren, members of the Blooming Grove 
colony who located in Hepburn township, Lycoming County, 
in 1805. The building is preserved by the Lycoming County 
Historical Society. They have also erected a museum beside 
the church, in which are kept relics and antiques of these 
pioneer settlers. Professor L. J. Ulmer, of Lock Haven State 
Teachers College, is a direct descendant, and was instrumental 
in collecting and preserving the many objects of sentimental 
and historic interest. 

The Sugar Valley church has recently been the center for 
civic activities. Pictures directed by state foresters and 
rangers for education of forest fire fighters have been shown, 
and meetings for memorial day events have been held here. 

Since the location of a C. C. C. Camp at Tea Springs, 
seven miles eastward, Brother Charles Schwenk alternates 
with an Evangelical minister in acting as chaplain for the 
Protestant boys of the camp. This work is done every second 
Sunday prior to the regular Sunday morning church school 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



189 



and church service. He was chaplain for four years of 
Loganton C. C. C. #66 Camp. 

The number of members is 66. 



Membership, Sugar Valley Congregation 



Bartges, Lawrence 

Bartges, Hester 

Bartges, Lela Belle 
*Boone, Amelia 

Boone, John C. 

Boone, Supera 

Boone, Laura Mae 

Boone, Daniel 

Brungard, Charles 
*Bnmgard, Catherine 

Brungard, Mary Doris 

Brungard, James 

* Brungard, Wilma 
Evarts, Verna Long 
Frank, Lizzie 
Fogleman, Melvin 
Fogleman, Myrtle 
Fogleman, Dorothy Jean 
Geary, William 

* Geary, Cora 
^Geisewite, Martha 

Geisewhite, Earnest 
Geisewhite, Miriam 
Grimes, Nora Schroyer 
Grimes, Worthey 
Grimes, Leota 
Grimes, Marlin 
Grimes, Danley 
Heggenstaller, Mary 
Heggenstaller, Fred 
Heggenstaller, Edward 
Heggenstaller, Ida 
Heggenstaller, Lee 
Heggenstaller, Erma 
Heggenstaller, Lee, Jr. 
Heggenstaller, Howard 



Heggenstaller, Gerald 
Heggenstaller, Edward, Jr. 
Heggenstaller, Joseph 

*Deceased. Sixty-six between 1934 and 1941. 
above deceased were "pillars". 



Heggenstaller, Raymond 
Heggenstaller, Anna Mae 
Heggenstaller, Mary, Jr. 
Heggenstaller, Glenn 
Hammersley, Betty 
Kephart, Euphemia 
Kephart, Helen Mary 
Livingston, Jennie 
Livingston, Audrey 
Livingston, William 
Long, B. Frank 

*Long, Mary 
Long, Ada Douty 

*Martz, Francis 
Martz, Milford 
Martz, Floretta 
Martz, Isabelle 
Martz, Harry, Jr. 
Penticoff, Roy 

* Penticoff, Anna 
Penticoff, Leilla Ida 
Persun, Lucille 
Schroyer, George 
Schroyer, Margaret 

"Schroyer, Chester 

*Schwenk, Edgar 
Schwenk, Susan 
Schwenk, Charles A. 

* Schwenk, Margaret Haas 
*Schwenk, Sophia 

Schwenk, Jennie 
Shadle, Elmer 
Showers, Betty 
Smith, Lantz 
*Smith, Belle 
Smith, Howard 
Smith, Fletcher 
Walizer, Clifford 
Walizer, Thema 



The 



190 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 






UPPER CODORUS CONGREGATION 

(Brumbaugh's History, page 326, and Falkenstein's 
History, page 97, are quoted.) 

This society is so distinguished from a branch of the 
Conewago near to which the people made their settlements 
in the township of Hanover and County of York, twenty miles 
from the town of York and one hundred and seven miles west 
by south from Philadelphia. The preachers are Messrs. Jacob 
Moyer and James Hetrick, but are not ordained. The families 
belonging to the place are about forty, whereof fifty-two 
persons are baptized. 

This was the first Brethren Church established west of 
Susquehanna. In 1738 when one Eldrick, Dierdorff, Bigler, 
Gripe, Studsman, and others united into a church, having 
Reverend Daniel Leatherman to their assistance. He left 
them and went to Monocacy, after him they had Reverend 
Nicolas Martin who also quitted them to go to Conococheague. 
Their successors are the present ministers before mentioned. 
It seems the volume promised on Maryland was never issued ; 
at any rate I have no knowledge of such volume being in 

existence. 

J. F. Saches says the volume on Maryland was written 
but not published. In MS form it burned in the late fire of the 
Baptist Publication Society. 

Many members went to the Conococheague and to 
Monocacy from the various congregations in Pennsylvania. 
Among them were prominent and efficient ministers, but we 
know little of their work in their early days. The scores of 
congregations of the present day, however, attest the faithful 
devotions of those pioneers and the success of the migration 

to the "Southland". 

The membership of the Little Conewago Congregation 
in 1770 was as follows: Jacob Moyer, exhorter, and wife; 
James Hendrick, exhorter, and wife; Hans Adams Sneider 
and wife; Barbara Sneider; George Wine and wife; Gohn 
Geiny and wife; Daniel Woods and wife; Henry Geiny and 
wife ; Joseph Moyer and wife ; Nickolas Housteter and wife ; 
Christian Houstetter and wife ; Rudy Brown and wife ; Dobis 
Brother and wife ; Jacob Miller and wife ; Michael Routs and 
wife; Mrs. Bowser; Mrs. Moyer; Stephen Peter and wife and 
daughter; Maud Bowser; George Peter; Henry Donner 
(Tanner) and wife; Michael Tanner (Donner) and wife; 
Jahn Moyer and wife ; Jacob Souder and wife ; Henry Hoeff 
and wife ; Hester Weis ; Christian Etor ; John Peter Weaver ; 
Barbara Bear; John Swarts and wife; Eliza Bearing; Great 

Hymen. 

The scope of territory included then what is now held by 
Hanover, Pleasant Hill and part of York. It was bounded by 






Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



191 



territory of Conewago, Bermudian, Codorus, and Maryland 
churches. 

Meetings were held in rotation over the district at private 
places — in barns or dwelling houses which were often built 
with an idea to throw two or more rooms together by large 
folding doors to accommodate a place for the meeting. A 
goodly number of brethren would come the evening before 
and a social time would be spent in Scriptural discussions and 
song and worship before retiring. Next morning breakfast 
was furnished by the host, assisted by guests, with the greatest 
delight to all present. The crowd began to swell to such 
a size that our attendance of today would be surprised. 
The hospitality of the host was specially fine. Dinner was 
furnished, free to all, at meeting. Their horses were cared 
for during the night and all well fed at meal time. A number 
of hostlers were always engaged prior to meeting to help to 
care for horses. The greatest respect was shown to everyone 
present, members, as well as neighbors. Sometimes these 
rotations would come around every sixteen weeks; later ten 
to eight weeks, finally the church houses were built. The old 
brethren were afraid when churches were built "Something 
might be lost". 

These rotations of meeting places were scattered over a 
distance of 50 miles between Westminster, Carroll County, 
Maryland, and York, York County, Pennsylvania. Christian 
Royer, John Myers, and Samuel Miller in Manchester district, 






Home of Christian Royer 
Built with moving partitions. Four rooms in one for meetings. 



192 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Maryland ; Henry Hohfs, Adam Buchers, Abraham Geimans, 
Samuel Myers, Jacob Millers, John Millers and Jacob Bussers, 
in Manheim township, Pennsylvania ; Aaron Baughers, Philip 
Millers, in Codorus township, Pennsylvania ; Jacob Stauffers, 
and Danners, in Heidleberg township, Pennsylvania ; Andrew 
Millers, George Mummerts, and John Millers, in Jackson 
township, Pennsylvania ; and other places. A Love Feast was 
held under an apple tree in the orchard on the farm of John 
Miller, near Millers school house, on the farm known after- 




Farm of Henry Hohf 
Love Feasts and District Meeting Were Held in Barn. Later 

the Conrad Stremmel Farm. 



ward as the Adam Snyder farm. On this occasion a sister who 
did not manifest such an humble spirit became very boisterous 
and Andrew Miller, then a young man, sought diligently for 
the civil officer who was engaged to keep order in the large 
crowd, to quiet her. 

In 1865 about 40 families, members of this congregation, 
moved to Illinois, lured there by greater inducements for 
financial gain, by the broad fertile acres. This was quite a 
draw on our congregations as among them were a number 
of ministers and deacons. A number settled around Astoria 
where we find them connected with church history there. 
Among these were Hamms, Danners, Stremmels, Mummerts, 
Lerews, Millers, Fitzs, Geimans, Eberts, etc. 






Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 193 

The Little Conewago Congregation or Upper Codorus 
Congregation, as now called, lies in part of two counties, York 
County, Pennsylvania, and Carroll County, Maryland, em- 
bracing a stretch of country about 50 miles square. The 
following churches were built in this area : Beaver Creek, 
Pleasant Hill, Black Rock, Chestnut Grove, Stoverstown, 
Melrose, and Wildasin's school house. 

After the Pleasant Hill and Stoverstown churches were 
built and Beaver Creek church was repaired, the Upper 
Codorus church considered the feasibility of dividing, which 
was peaceably done in 1906, by making the Hanover Junction 
Railroad and public road leading from Krofts mill to Hanover 
pumping station the dividing line between the now Pleasant 
Hill Congregation and Upper Codorus Congregation. The 
Pleasant Hill house, Stoverstown, Beaver Creek and Wildasin's 
school house being now considered their property with the 
following ministers, Elder Moses Mummert, David B. Hohf, 
Henry M. Baugher, Emanuel Babylon, and Samuel Jacobs, 
and about 100 membership. Love Feast dishes were 
all provided for at Pleasant Hill houses prior to the 
division. 

Upper Codorus, the parent congregation, retained the 
Black Rock house and Chestnut Grove with the following 
ministers: Elder E. S. Miller, Joseph Price, George M. 
Baugher, and A. S. Baugher. The membership was 200. 

The money in the treasury was equally divided after all 
debts were paid. 

The following church houses were considered to belong 
to the Pleasant Hill Congregation: Beaver Creek, the oldest 
house of worship, situated along the Hanover and Abbotts- 
town pike, four miles north of Hanover; Pleasant Hill, three 
miles north of Spring Grove, situated in Jackson township, 
York County; and Stoverstown house, situated in North 
Codorus township, York County, about three miles south of 
Spring Grove and four miles east of Jefferson. Beaver Creek 
is a good substantial brick building about 40'x36', lately 
remodeled. Pleasant Hill house, about 70'x40', is a neat 
frame building and fully equipped with basement to hold 
Love Feast. Stoverstown is a frame house, about 40'x36', 
built in 1899. In 1906 Pleasant Hill Congregation was formed 
with meeting houses at Pleasant Hill, Beaver Creek, Stovers- 
town or North Codorus, and Wildasin's school house. This 
school house is well suited to holding services. No school was 
held here, but the community held it as meeting place. There 
is a large well kept cemetery joining it. A fund is established 
to keep house and cemetery in order. It is held jointly by 
Lutheran, Reformed, and German Baptist. 

The Black Rock house was built in 1876 on land bought 
Lorn Henry Hohf at price of $50.00. It is situated in a rural 
district in Manheim township, York County, Pennsylvania, 



194 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




First Church at Black Rock, Upper Codorus, Built in 1876 




Black Rock Church Remodeled 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 195 

about 10 miles south of Hanover and one-fourth mile from the 
Mason and Dixon line on state road leading from Glenville to 
intersection of Baltimore pike at Sherman's church. 

It is a substantial brick building 70x45 feet with well 
arranged basement for Love Feast occasions and an attic 
divided into four separate parts for Sunday school rooms. The 
cost was over $3,500.00. 

The same time as the building of the church a well was 
dug through rock at the east end of church. Water was 
reached at 75 feet. An old fashioned wooden pump was 
installed which did not give satisfaction. Then about 800 feet 
of pipe was laid from a near-by spring which gives an 
abundance of water supply. 

The building committee was Elder Henry Hohf, Elder 
Aaron Baugher and Joseph Price. Reverend Joel Miller was 
the purchasing agent for the building material. 

In 1927 the house was remodeled at a cost of over 
$5,000.00. The remodeling committee was Edward S. Miller, 
Aaron S. Baugher, George M. Resser, Noah S. Sellers, and 
Amos Wolf. The money was all subscribed before work was 
started. The place was lighted by Delco light plant, but is 
now supplied by current from commercial line. The two Love 
Feasts are held here every year when capacity of house is 
taxed to its utmost. We still have it the "old way" by begin- 
ning on Saturday forenoon and closing at Sunday dinner, and 
feeding the people at the church gratis. 

Chestnut Grove House 

Chestnut Grove church was built in 1819 on the site 
where Shue's school house was located and sold in 1853 by 
only surviving trustee of Lutheran, German Baptist, and 
Presbyterians Society, to school board of Codorus township, 
Pennsylvania. It was bought by Aaron Baugher in 1877 for 
$25.00 when township built a new school house. The old 
house was used until 1885 when Chestnut Grove house was 
built. It is a neatly finished brick building about 50x36 feet. 
Services are held every two weeks. There is a thriving Sunday 
school. A well-kept cemetery is on ground were a number of 
early church pioneers are sleeping. 

Melrose house is situated in a small village along the 
Baltimore pike about 10 miles south of Hanover and 40 miles 
north of Baltimore. The house was bought by the Upper 
Codorus Congregation in 1906 and converted in 1911 into a 
suitable place of worship. Preaching services and Sunday 
school are held every Sunday. 

All our finances were always raised by free will subscrip- 
tions and offerings. Our people are nearly all rural folks. 
Their money is mainly invested in real estate. Therefore they 



.96 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Chestnut Grove Church 

do not possess much ready cash to meet the demands for 
money that has to be frequently made in carrying on church 
work. 



Biography of Andrew Miller and Descendants 

Early in the nineteenth century, Andrew Miller, Sr., had 
the oversight of the Little Conewago Congregation which 
comprised what is now Upper Codorus, Pleasant Hill, and 
Hanover Congregations. 

Andrew Miller was born in York County, Pennsylvania, 
in 1762 and died October 12, 1835. On October 29, 1785 he 
married Annie Danner (spelled Tanner or Donner in 
Brumbaugh's History) who was born May 6, 1768, and died 
1808. After the death of his first wife he married Elizabeth 
Utz who was born January 12, 1781, and died Novemebr 6, 
1860. They are buried at Roth's church in Jackson township, 
York County, Pennsylvania. 

There were nine children born to the first marriage — 
Barbara, married Bankert; Rachel, married Mummert; 
Elizabeth, married Bucher; Samuel Danner; Henry; 
Catherine, married Trimmer; Andrew, David, Solomon. 

The two children born of the second marriage are 
John U., and Mary, married George Mummert. 

Samuel D. Miller succeeded his father, Andrew Miller, 
with the oversight of the church. He moved south of the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



197 




8** 1 * 



Home of Samuel Miller, 
Then Joel Miller, then E. S. Miller, now his son, A. G. Miller. 

Built with folding doors. 



Mason and Dixon line close to what is now the Black Rock 
church, on a farm which became the Miller homestead now in 
possession of his great-grandson. 

Samuel D. Miller married Sarah Bucher March 3 1816 
who was born January 17, 1779. To them were born ten 
children— Elizabeth, married Henry Hoff; Solomon; Annie 
married Isaac Myers; Amos; Barbara, married Benjamin 
Bowser; Sarah, married Jacob Buser; Samuel B., married 
Kaziah Myers; Jonas; Joel B., married Lydia Sweitzer; Lydia, 
married Nathan Koutz and later George Bollinger 

n/r o a ?o U ^ D - 7 ^ iller died May 18, 1870, and his wife on 
May I, 1869. When he was disabled by infirmities his brother 
Andrew, took the oversight of the church about 1868 and 
continued until his death in 1880. 

n/r-n Jo ? 1 B :i Miller is a minister of the third generation of the 
Miller family. He married Lydia Sweitzer. To them were 
born five children, two of them sons and three of them 
daughters as follows : Edward S., Annie S., Samuel S., Sarah S., 
Susie S. 

Edward S. Miller, born September 1, 1858, being of the 
fourth generation in the ministry was baptized by Andrew 
Miller m June 1872, in his fourteenth year. He was elected 

• .oor , 6 of deacon in th e year 1884, and to the ministry 
in 1885, forwarded to second degree in 1894 and ordained in 



198 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder E. S. Miller and Wife 



May, 1900. He had two sons of which John G. is a minister 
of the fifth generation. 

It would only be fitting to give a history of the other 
minister descendants of the Miller family. Samuel D. Miller, 
son of Andrew Miller, Sr., succeeded him in the eldership. 
His daughter, Elizabeth, married Henry Hoff who served m 
the eldership. His daughter, Savilla, married Theodore Price 
who served in the ministry in Illinois. Their son, John Price, 
is the present pastor in Hemet, California. 

Annie Miller married Isaac Myers who served in the 
eldership in the Codorus Congregation. His son, Jacob, also 
served as elder in the same congregation. 

Barbara Miller married Benjamin Bowser. Three sons 
of this union are ministers in 1934 — Israel, in New Fairview 
Congregation; Samuel, in Montana; and Jacob, in California. 

Sarah Miller married Jacob Buser. Their daughter, 
Lydia, married A. S. Baugher, of the Upper Codorus 
Congregation. Four sons of this union and one grandson are 
active in the ministry at present time — Jacob I. Baugher, 
Hershey, Pennsylvania; A. C. Baugher, Elizabethtown, Penn- 
sylvania; Edward E. Baugher, Hanover, Pennsylvania; 
Raymond A. Baugher, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Norman, son of J. I. Baugher, is a minister at Bethany 
Biblical Seminary, Chicago. Joel B. Miller, son of Samuel D., 
served in the Upper Codorus Congregation. Elder Edward S. 
Miller served in the same congregation. Samuel S. Miller, son 
of Joel B., served as elder in Upper Conewago Congregation 
from 1922 until 1938. 

The following are the descendants of Elder Andrew 
Miller, Jr., who married Elizabeth Latchaw, who were the 
grandparents of Elders Daniel Bowser and Joseph J. Bowser, 
of the York Congregation : 



200 History Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

David Miller served in the ministry in the Old Order 
Brethren. His son and grandson were ministers in the Old 

Order Brethren. 

Solomon Miller married Rebecca Wolf. They were the 
grandparents of Elder Jacob E. Trimmer, at present in the 
Carlisle Congregation. 

John U. Miller of the second marriage, was the grand- 
father of Henry Miller, at present in the Pleasant Hill Congre- 
gation, and the great-grandfather of Jacob Miller, of the New 
Fairview Congregation. 

Mary Miller married George Mummert, the parents ot 
Elder Moses Mummert, who served in Pleasant Hill Congrega- 
tion, and grandparents of David Mummert, at present serving 
in the Upper Codorus Congregation. 

Of the thirty descendants of Andrew Miller, br., who 
served in the ministry, fifteen are active today. 

The Miller biography will head the list of some ot our 
ministers who served here but their history cannot be traced 
prior to their service here. George Petry, born 1762, died 
1823, aged 60 years, and John Keeney who were elders men- 
tioned by Brumbaugh in introduction of this sketch. Others 
serving since the Millers in rotation are as follows, before the 
division: Christian Royer, Jacob Shambarger, non-resident 
elder for about three years; Henry Hohf, presiding elder for 
two years, died 1896, aged 82 years; Aaron Baugher, presiding 
elder for 18 years, died in 1904, age 78; Daniel Bucher, 
minister; Moses Mummert, presiding elder for two years; 
Joseph Price, died 1918, age 78; David Hohf, minister; 
Emanuel Babylon, minister; Edw. S. Miller, elder for 25 years, 
died 1936, age 78; George M. Baugher, elder; Henry M. 
Baugher, elder ; Aaron S. Baugher, elder eight years, 1929- 
1937; David Smith, died 1914, age 59; C. Geiman, elder; 
George M. Reeser, elder; Jacob I. Baugher; Noah Sellers pre- 
siding elder, 1937 to date; John G. Miller; Joseph M 
Baugher; Mark Wildasin, elected 1935; Daniel Mummert, 
1937 ; Raymond Bucher, 1937 ; Henry Miller, 1937. 

Aaron Baugher, Sr., son of George D. Baugher, was born 
in 1830 in Berwick township, Adams County, Pennsylvania. 
He was one of 12 children born to them and was reared in a 
home of very limited means. His father died when Aaron was 
12 years old. When old enough he joined the Lutheran 
church and then was placed in the home of Jacob Bucher a 
Mennonite, and his wife a Lutheran. He stayed here until 18 
vears of age, when he was placed in the home of Daniel A. 
Bucher, minister of the German Baptist Brethren Here he 
learned the tanning business which he followed the rest ot 

1S 'in 1854 he married Christianna Miller, a daughter of 
Philip Miller, members of Brethren church, and moved to a 
farm in Codorus township near Jefferson, where he lived until 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



201 




Home of Aaron Baugher 
Meetings held in winter until 1896. 




Barn of Aaron Baugher 
Meetings held here in summer time. 



202 History— Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

he died. He carried on the business of tanning and farming. 
He joined the Brethren church; was elected deacon, minister, 

and elder. 

There were four sons and one daughter born to them. 
One son died in infancy. George M. and Henry M. were 
elected ministers and Fremont a deacon, all in Upper Codorus 
Congregation. Christianna, his wife, died. Later he married 
Catharine Sweitzer to whom were born four sons and two 
daughters. Aaron S. who was later elected to ministry 
and Daniel S. a deacon in Meadow Branch church, 
TVT *\ t* v land 

He served the Upper Codorus Congregation as presiding 
elder for 18 years. He was a successful business man and 
was always ready with his purse to help any worthy cause. 
He had the confidence of the people wherever known. His 
integrity was never questioned. He was held in revential 
fear "His word was as good as his bond" and he expected 
the same of everybody else, especially of church members. 
He died in 1904 and is buried at Chestnut Grove. 

Elder A. S. Baugher, sixth son of Elder Aaron and 
Catherine Baugher, was born February 7, 1867, in Codorus 
township, York County, Pennsylvania. He worked on farm 
and in a tannery until 1886, when he started teaching. He 
attended summer school at East Berlin and Millersville State 
Normal; taught for twenty years. In 1889 he married Lydia 
M. Buser and moved on a farm and worked on a farm in 
summer time and taught school in winter. 

In 1900 was elected to deaconship; one year later to the 
ministry. In 1912 ordained to full ministry and elected as 
presiding elder in 1929, serving until 1937, when he declined 
o y*p-p1 pction. 

Unto this couple were born seven sons and six daughters, 
all following the teaching profession except two. John, a 



Elder A. S. Baugher and Wife 







M 



m 



o 

ft 

o 

o 
u 

<D 



i3 
fa 

• i-H 
> 

o 

CD 



CD 
h-1 






w 



I— I •!— t 



>. 



fa 






PQ 



; w 



^ 







fa 


fa 




aT 




•i— i 









fl 




•i— i 




s 




*■• 




>» . 




b >» 




C3 ^-H 




^ o3 




-M 




caM 




rt . 




«T3 




<< C 




o 




±£ 




^ >> 




5j0 <3 




"S« 




o r 




^O 




-+^> . 








■— ' 




kT-°~ 




£ o 




o 2 




^h c3 




,t-3 




-(J 




w ~ 








* 




TJ 




fa 



204 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

telegrapher, died in 1927; J. I., E. E., A. C, and R. R. are 

ministers in Brethren church. 

A. S, Baugher served twice on standing committee; a 
number of times as delegate to A. M. and D. M. ; was moder- 
ator of elders meeting and ministerial meeting ; reading clerk 
of elders meeting and D. M. ; served on district ministerial 
board over 18 years; 20 years on Brethren Home board and 
trustee of college over 20 years. 

Deacon List Since i870 

George Mummert, Sr., Adam Bucher, Abram Geiman, 
Jonas Royer, Conrad Stremmel, Daniel Leinart, Solomon 





Deacon Jonas Royer and Wife 



Becker, Solomon Keeny, H. P. Keeney, Geo. M. Baugher, 
Henry M. Baugher, Fremont M. Baugher, Aaron S. Baugher, 
C. Geiman, Daniel Royer, David Smith, Calvin Wildasin, 




Deacon A. M. Wolf and Wife 




First 



Deacons, Upper Codorus Congregation 
t row, left to right : Geo. Albaugh, Ira Sterner, Daniel Rover Aaron 
Werner, Calvin Wildasin; second row: John Runk, Geo B Werner 

Raymond Fuhrman, Russel Royer. 




Deacons Wives 

Fir WarZ'r Ie Mr^r r if ht: w^ Daniel R ° y , er ' Mrs " Geo - Albaugh, Mrs. Aaron 

Warner, Mrs. CalvmW^ldasin; second row: Mrs. Raymond Fuhrman, 

Mrs. Amos Wolf, Mrs. Ira Sterner, Mrs. John Runk. 



206 



History Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 



Amos Wolf, George B. Werner, Aaron B. Werner, George B. 
Albaugh, Ira Sterner, Ed. E. Baugher, Leander Fuhrman, 
Daniel Mummert. 

Interesting Chronology 

1902 The use of surrey vehicles was first sanctioned. 

1903 — First trustees appointed in congregation — A. S. 
Baugher and Geo. Mummert for three years; C. Geiman and 
H. M. Baugher for two years; Jonas Roger and Zach Danner 

for one year. . . 

1903 — Complaint was made against members having 

graphaphones. 

1903 — Starting to have, for first time, two Love Feasts in 

a year. J . , 

1904 (May 6th), Pleasant Hill Congregation organized. 

1905 — Sunday school at 
Black Rock. 

1905 — Boundary line 
between Codorus and Black 
R 0C k — (P.P. 61 of minute 

book). 

1906 — Melrose house 

bought. 

1907 — One-half acre of 
land procured from Strem- 
mels by donation from heirs 
of Conrad Stremmel. 

1911 — George Resser, 
certificate received as min- 
ister. 

1911 — Melrose house 

changed. 

1912 — A. S. Baugher 
ordained to full ministry. 

1916 — First Bible insti- 
tute held by Ober and 
Schlosser. 

1916 — Evangelist allow- 
ed to ask converts to rise or 
come forward. ^ 

1916— Passed, delegates to A. M. or D. M. or other 

conventions not to succeed themselves. 

1916 — Meetings held, between school terms, at Miller s 
school house, Maryland. 

1916 — Sunday school at Melrose. 

1917 — Sunday school at Chestnut Grove. 

1918— (April), J. I. Baugher, N. S. Sellers, John G. Miller 

elected to ministry. 

1918 — Sunday school and ministerial meeting held at 

Black Rock house. 




Elder George M. Resser and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



207 




■ 




Minister Raymond Bucher & Wife Minister Henry E. Miller & Wife 





Deacon L. S. Fuhrman and Wife Minister Mark Wildasin & Wife 



208 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 




Minister Daniel Mummert and Wife 



1918 C. A. Wildasin, Joseph Baugher and George 

Warner elected to deaconship. 

1921 — Joseph Baugher elected to ministry October 8. 
Committee, C. L. Baker, and S. S. Miller. 

1921 — Aaron Werner and E. E. Baugher elected deacons. 

1921 — C. Geiman, G. Resser ordained December 31. 

1928 — August 25, George Albaugh and Ira Sterner 
elected deacons. C. L. Baker and S. S. Miller. 

1933 — L. S. Fuhrman 

elected deacon. 

1933 — Daniel Mummert 
elected deacon. M. A. 
Jacobs, S. B. Myers. Elec- 
tion held for ministry, none 
declared. 

1934 — Joseph Baugher 

moved to York. 

1935 — Mark Wildasin 

elected to ministry. 

1937 — Daniel Mum- 
mert, Raymond Bucher and 
Henry Miller elected 
licentiates. 

1937 — N. S. Sellers was 
elected successor to A. S. 
Baugher as presiding elder. 

Our congregation has 
furnished a number of young- 
brethren as ministers, who 
are scattered all over the 
Brotherhood, among whom 
are : Samuel Bowser, of 
Montana; Jacob Bowser, of 




Presiding Elder N. S. Sellers 
and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 209 

California; Theo. Price, of Illinois; Jacob Baugher, of 
Hershey, Pennsylvania ; E. E. Baugher, of Hanover, Pennsyl- 
vania; R. R. Baugher, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; A. C. 
Baugher, of Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania; Joseph M. Baugher, 
of York, Pennsylvania ; S. S. Miller, of East Berlin, Pennsyl- 
vania ; Paul Newcomer, of Menges Mills, Pennsylvania ; James 
Sellers, of Spring Grove, Pennsylvania ; Roy Miller, of Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania ; Lester Royer, of Lebanon, Pennsylvania ; 
John G. Miller, of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 



UPPER CONEWAGO CONGREGATION 

The Upper Conewago Congregation came into existence 
in the year 1849 as the result of a division of the territory thei> 
belonging to the Big Conewago Congregation into two sepa- 
rate congregations, to be known as Upper Conewago and 
Lower Conewago. Thus it follows, that in order to secure a 
complete picture of Upper Conewago, it will be necessary to 
use as a prelude to the history which follows, that information 
given in the history of Big Conewago, from its beginning in 
the year 1741 until the time of the division in 1849. Upper 
Conewago is not, as its organization date seems to indicate, 
a comparatively young congregation, but actually dates back 
to the year 1741, and is justly called one of the early colonial 
congregations. (See Big Conewago, chapter II, page 51.) 

There were nine centers of activity as follows : Latimore, 
Mountain, Bermudian, Conewago, East Berlin, West Berlin, 
Longeneckers, Pigeon Hills and Seven Hundred. Although 
some minor changes were made in later years, the boundary 
lines a>nd districts are substantially the same today as they 
were then. Accurate records as to the number of members 
living within the confines of the Upper Conewago boundaries 
at the time of its organization are not available, but it is 
estimated that there must have been approximately thirty 
families. 

Brother Adam Brown was ordained as an elder at the 
same meeting in which the division was made, and immediately 
became the first presiding elder of Upper Conewago. 

After the division the two meeting houses — Altlands, 
near Bigmount, and Wolgamuths, near Dillsburg — which had 
belonged to Big Conewago, became the property of the Lower 
Conewago Congregation, and Upper Conewago was left with- 
out a house of worship. It was necessary, therefore, to hold 
meetings and Love Feasts in the houses and barns of the 
brethren. During these early days sociability among brethren 
was at its peak. 

In 1851, however, a building committee consisting of 
Daniel Brown, George Dierdorff, and Daniel Baker was 



210 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

appointed. This committee entered into an agreement with 
John Mummert, a deacon, to purchase a tract of land near 
East Berlin for the sum of $20.00, said tract of land to be 
used as a site for a meeting house, and the enlargement of the 
burial ground, which apparently existed there at the time. 
In the year 1852 a small stone meeting house was erected 
thereon, and on May 3, 1854, John Mummert granted a deed 
for the property to Abraham Brown, Samuel Longenecker 
and John Mummert, deacons of the German Baptist Society 
(Upper Conewago Congregation). The location chosen was 
the site of our present Mummert meeting house. Necessary 
funds were solicited from the members, and much of the labor 
and material used was furnished by faithful members as their 
contribution towards the project. 

The first Mummert church did not have a basement for 
use on Love Feast occasions, and these services were still held 
in private homes. It is said that the farm along the Beaver 
Creek, owned by the late Brother John and Sister Barbara 
Bechtel, was the scene of many of our early Love Feasts. It is 
also said that a number of our members had been buried in a 
graveyard on this farm, the remains later having been moved 
to the" Mummert Cemetery, after the erection of our meeting 
house there. 

Having realized the need of a meeting house at the Upper 
end of our congregation for some years, the brethren decided 
to build a second house of worship in Latimore township, 
near York Springs. The location chosen is the site of our 
present Latimore meeting house. 

In the year 1856, Samuel Burkholder, Jacob P. Lerew, 
and Michael Brown, deacons, purchased from Jacob Greist, 
one acre of land for the sum of $100.00, for the purpose of 
building a house of worship, and the establishment of a burial 

ground. 

A church was erected on this spot shortly thereafter, and 
Upper Conewago now had a house of worship at each end of 
its territory. As in the case of the Mummert church, much 
of the labor and material used in construction was donated 
by the members, and money needed was raised by subscription. 

From 1860 to 1886, under the leadership of Elder Adam 
Brown and his co-workers, who will be named later, the con- 
gregation experienced a sound and steady growth, so much 
so, in fact, that in addition to the services held in the two 
church houses, meetings were also held in private homes, at 
the Five Points school house, and at the Baker school house. 
These meetings were well attended and much good seed was 

sown. 

As a result of its steady growth, Upper Conewago was 
able to build two more meeting houses in 1874. To take care 
of the central part of the territory, a house was built on a two 
acre tract of land, sold by Washington and John Myers to 



CONGREGATIONS OF SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 



211 




Hampton Meeting House 

Original house built in 1874, destroyed by storm and rebuilt in 1894; 

destroyed by fire in 1927, present house built in 1929. 



Samuel Hollinger, John Brough, and William Gitt, deacons, 
for the sum of $225.00. A burial ground was provided at the 
rear of the church. The location chosen, near Hampton, is 
the site on which our present Hampton meeting house stands. 

The other meeting house, built in the same year, was, 
and has since been known as the Trostle house. It was built 
on a tract of land containing one acre, acquired from Brother 
Isaac B. Trostle on June 6, 1874, for the sum of $100.00. This 
house stands on the same site today, and is located about four 
miles northwest of York Springs. 

In the late 1870's Elder Adam Brown, feeling that the 
oversight of the congregation was weighing heavily upon his 
physical strength, asked for help in performing his duties. 
As a result of this request, Jacob P. Lerew and Daniel 
Longenecker were ordained as eiders, and thereafter assisted 
Elder Brown in his work. 

Some of the ministers and deacons who assisted Elder 
Brown, faithfully, during the early days of our congregation 
were John Brough, David H. Baker, John Harlacher, George 
Winand and Peter KaufFman as ministers; Samuel 
Longenecker, Abraham Brown, John Mummert, Samuel 
Burkholder, Michael Brown, Samuel Hollinger, William Gitt, 
Solomon Keeney, Frederick Winand, John Harbold and 
Joshua Leas, as deacons. 



212 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 










































. ap i 




JaK^O™'^*. A^ 






m 


?^NI 






W*. ■:';: ■'■'■' : ■ '"' W : ^BB^H 


















Mummert Meeting House and Graveyard 
Original house built in 1852; present hous3 built in 1832. 




Interior Mummert Meeting House 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 213 

In the year 1882 the small stone meeting house at 
Mummerts, which had now served as a place of worship for 
thirty years, was replaced by a larger brick structure. This 
house, together with additional land acquired at various times 
for enlarging the cemetery, and together with the 18 acre 
farm adjoining it (purchased by Upper Conewago in 1877) is 
the Mummert church as we know it today. It is interesting 
to note that in planning the new house, provision was made 
for those travelers who came from a distance and who found 
it necessary to remain over night. These accommodations on 
tne second floor were largely used at Love Feast services, 
which were then held for two days. Necessary equipment for 
the preparation of meals was also provided on the basement 
floor. This was the first church in Upper Conewago providing 
such accommodations, and they are still used today. 

Although he had been assisted in his duties for a number 
of years by Elders Jacob P. Lerew and Daniel Longenecker, 
Elder Adam Brown still exercised oversight of the 
congregation. Now, however, his health and strength were 
failing him, and he felt that he was no longer able to bear the 
burden. In order to relieve him, somewhat, Elder Jacob P. 
Lerew was entrusted with the office of presiding elder, which 
office he held until the year 1888. 

To Elders Brown, Longenecker, and Lerew, and to their 
co-workers, belongs the credit for having brought the congre- 
gation through the difficult period of infancy. It is said by 
those who knew Elder Brown, that he was more than willing 
to make any personal sacrifice in order to promote the welfare 
of the church. 

Elder Brown was loved and respected as a man of God, 
not only by the members of our own church, but by all the 
entire community. Elder Brown departed this life in 1896. 

On June 1, 1888, the congregation elected Peter Brown 
as presiding elder. J. A. Long, who later became elder of the 
York Congregation, was elected to the ministry by our 
congregation in the same year. 

In 1892 a new meeting house was built at Latimore. The 
building committee consisted of George Winand, John Lerew, 
John Raffensberger, Henry Harbold, and George Dierdorff. 

The new brick church (our present Latimore house) was 
built on the site of the old church, and cost approximately 
$2,400.00. It was about the same size as the old church, but 
a basement for use on Love Feast occasions was provided, and 
a second story was fitted out as sleeping quarters. Many 
times these lodging facilities were filled to capacity. A long 
shed was built to the rear of the church to provide a place of 
shelter for the horses. 

The first Love Feast ever held in the Latimore house was 
held in the year 1892. 



214 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Latimore Meeting House 
Original house built in 1856; present house in 1892. 



In April, 1894, our Hampton house was almost totally 
destroyed by a storm which swept over that community. Due 
largely to the honest efforts and willing sacrifices of the 
brethren, the house was rebuilt a short time later. 

Some of our faithful deacon brethren who were active in 
assisting Elder Peter Brown during this period were: Jesse 
Masemore, John Lerew, Joseph Bowser, George Firestone, 
E. L. Kauffman, William Stoner, Daniel Bear, and Elias 
Hollinger. Two of our younger brethren who were just be- 
ginning their work as deacons were John Raffensberger and 
C. L. Baker. They were both installed on April 15, 1895. 

On May 5, 1896, Upper Conewago considered the matter 
of starting a Sunday school, and a committee consisting of 
Samuel S. Miller, O. V. Long, C. L. Baker, D. H. Baker, E. L. 
Kauffman, and George Resser were appointed to make surveys 
and recommendations. 

The first appointment of a board of trustees was made 
on April 19, 1897. Joseph Bowser, Michael Wiley and John 
Lerew were the first board. It was to be the duty of these 
trustees to assist the deacons in carrying on the business 
affairs of the church. 

A year later, on April 28, 1898, two additiontal deacons 
were chosen. They were George Resser, who is now an elder 
in the Upper Codorus Congregation, and John Trostle. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



215 



In 1899 another house of worship was erected. This 
house (our present East Berlin church) was built in the town 
of East Berlin. The building committee, consisting of Joseph 
Bowser, Michael Wiley, and Daniel Brown, purchased a site 
from Dr. R. N. Meisenhelder for the sum of $450.00. It was 
located on Locust Street. A brick church costing approxi- 
mately $2,500.00 was erected on this plot. Most of the neces- 
sary funds were raised by subscription. Because of the close 
proximity of the Mummert graveyard, a burial ground was 




East Berlin House, Built in 1899 



not provided at East Berlin. This house is the only "town" 
church in our congregation. Each of the other churches is 
located several miles from the nearest town. The dedication 
services at the new East Berlin church were held February 
25, 1900. The sermon was preached by Elder Levi Mohler. 
Three years later (1903) the district ministerial and Sunday 
school meeting was held in this church. 

About this time a request for a mid-week prayer service 
and a request for Christian Workers' meetings was acted 
upon. These requests were granted, and instructions were 
given to use the East Berlin church, when there were no 
requests for the meetings in private homes. 

On October 5, 1901, Elder Peter Brown, who had served 
as presiding elder for approximately 14 years, was called 
Home. His loss was keenly felt by the congregation, and by 
the community as a whole. 



216 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Elder Peter Brown's successor as presiding elder was 
Orville V. Long. He served in this capacity for a little less 
than two years. 

While Elder Long was in charge, Upper Conewago built 
its last new meeting house. It was erected on a plot, donated 
for the purpose by John L. Bosserman and wife. It was 
located near Baker's school house in Reading township. 

The building committee, consisting of John Bosserman, 
John Harlacher, and John Trostle, finished their work and 
turned the new building over to the congregation for dedica- 
tion on November 22, 1903. Thereafter services were held in 
the new church instead of in the Baker school house. Funds 
to defray the cost of the building were raised by subscription. 

Pausing briefly to summarize the physical growth of 
Upper Conewago, we find that from 1849 to 1903 the member- 
ship increased from about 100 to approximately 275. Regular 
services were now being held in six church houses, with 
special services at Five Points, New Chester, and Bragtown. 

A total of nine church houses (including the rebuilding 
of three) had been constructed at a cost of about $20,000.00. 
Funds were practically all raised by subscription. Upper 
Conewago had also purchased the farm adjoining our 
Mummert church for $1,700.00. This farm was for use and 
occupancy of the sexton at the Mummert house. 

It was noteworthy, too, that during this period of 
expansion the poor were not neglected. The primary busi- 
ness, as recorded on the minutes of every council meeting, was 
the matter of assisting the poor. These minutes also show 
that the practice of good housekeeping was not limited to tho 
proper usage of finances, but embodied the maintenance of 
high spiritual standards as well. The elder's warnings against 
worldliness run like an unbroken thread through the minutes 
of the various meetings. 

Although it is definitely known that Sunday school was 
held at Mummerts prior to this time, the first actual record of 
the election of a Sunday school superintendent indicates that 
C. L. Baker and Peter B. Kauffman were both elected at the 
East Berlin house, as the result of a tie vote cast at council 
meeting held January 1, 1902. Sunday school has continued, 
without interruption, until the present time. A record of 
superintendents in their chronological order is as follows : 
Charles Baker, Peter B. Kauffman, Andrew Bowser, Walter 
Keeney, and D. E. Brandt. Assistants who have served were : 
G. M. Resser, J. B. Bechtel, David Bosserman, David Brown, 
Silas Barnes, Robert King, Bruce Anderson, Harry Mummert, 
and Titus Sipe. 

On September 29, 1903, William A. Anthony was elected 
presiding elder to succeed Orville V. Long. Elder Anthony 
remained in the office until May 20, 1905, when he was 
succeeded by C. L. Baker. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 217 

It was shortly after this time that the home of Elder Long 
was destroyed by fire and, unfortunately, many early church 
records and documents which would have been of value in 
writing this history were lost. Elder Long later moved from 
this congregation to southern California where he remained 
until the time of his death. 

On April 29, 1905, George M. Resser was elected to the 
ministry and Samuel S. Miller and Daniel Bowser were 
electod deacons. 

In 1906 requests for regular Sunday school came from 
Hampton, Latimore, Bakers and Trostles, and on April 14, 
1907, it was decided to organize these four schools. Records 
which perhaps are incomplete indicate that the superinten- 
dents who served at Hampton were : Norman King, Charles 
Lehigh, E, K. Leatherman, John Leinert, Paul Miller, and 
Earl Witter. Assistant superintendents were : George Spahr, 
Edgar Lear, Roy Mummert, Harvey Herman, Paul Miller, Jr., 
and Sister Annie Leinert. Many of these officers also served 
as teachers. Other faithful teachers were Sisters Flora Dicks, 
Annie Leinert, Dora Miller, Agnes Witter, and Mildred Miller. 
We appreciate the services of all who willingly shared in this 
work. 

Records of the Latimore Sunday school which also may 
be incomplete indicate that the superintendents were : George 
Hull, Edward Wolf, Ervin Baum, Paul Wagner, and Luther 
Baum. 

There are no available records to show who carried on 
the Sunday school work at Bakers and Trostles. 

On April 14, 1906, Samuel S. Miller and Daniel Bowser 
were elected to the ministry, and Samuel H. Baker and David 
Brown became deacons. Brother Baker is still serving us 
today, and is one of our oldest deacons. 

On May 11, 1907, George Winand was elected to the 
eldership, and George Resser was advanced to the second 
degree ministry. W. G. Group and Clayton Weaver were 
elected deacons in the same year, on the 19th day of October. 
Brother Weaver moved out of our congregation on May 23. 
1908. 

Brother Samuel Miller was advanced to the second 
degree ministry, and S. M. Lehigh and Bucher Harlacher 
were elected deacons on May 23, 1908. 

S. M. Lehigh and W. G. Group were elected to the 
ministry on October 10, 1908. 

On September 25, 1909, Abraham Hull and C. C. Brown 
were ordained elders. Both of these brethren came to Upper 
Conewago from other congregations by certificate. 

On April 30, 1910, Bucher Harlacher was elected to the 
ministry, and William Brough and Daniel Stoner were elected 
deacons. Brother Stoner passed away several years ago, and 
Brother Brough, having served us faithfully until the present 



218 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

time passed away on March 16, 1941, even as this history is 
being written. Brother Brough was a member of the com- 
mittee which is attempting to write the history of Upper 
Conewago, and was very anxious to see it in completed form. 
It is a sorrowful coincidence, indeed, that Brother Brough was 
called home just at the time that the record of his election 
as a deacon was being written into this manuscript. 

On April 22, 1911, S. M. Lehigh and W. G. Group were 
advanced to the second degree ministry, and Andrew Bowser 
and W. L. Kauffman were elected deacons. Brother Bowser 
and Brother Kauffman served as deacons until the time of 
their deaths. 

Samuel S. Miller was ordained an elder by the 
congregation on May 16, 1912. 

In the fall of 1913 the district ministerial and Sunday 
school meeting was held in the East Berlin church. This was 
the second District Meeting held at the East Berlin house. 

About this time it was decided to discontinue regular 
meetings at the Trostle house, the reason given was that many 
Brethren families had moved out of that community, and the 
attendance was too small to justify regular appointments 

there. 

On August 2, 1913, George Hull and George Harbold 
were elected deacons. Brother Harbold serves us as a deacon 

In 1915 E. M. Wolf came to Upper Conewago by 
certificate. He remained here until 1941 at which time he 
transferred his certificate to Marsh Creek. 

In 1915 some of the sisters of our congregation organized 
a Ladies' Aid Society. Some of the members of this organiza- 
tion were as follows: Ida Brown, president; Alice Bosserman, 
treasurer ; Elmira Group, Minnie Baker, Lucinda Baker, Sarah 
Sunday, Emma Miller, Ellen Kauffman, Cora Bosserman, 
Emma Bechtel, Lizzie Burgand, Ida Mummert, Kate Sunday, 
Alice Brown, Rachael Pentz, Lizzie Weaver, Annie Danner, 
Lulu Lerew, Ellen Wagner, Elizabeth Bowser, Mary Jacobs, 
Annie Brown, Annie Bosserman, Kate Sprenkle, Esther 
kauffman, Annie Miller, and Annie Leinert. Although only 
nine of these original members are still living, the Ladies' Aid 
today has a membership of twenty-four. The present member- 
ship is as follows : Florence Danner, president ; Ruth Sipe, vice- 
president; Mary Altland, secretary-treasurer; Annie Brown, 
Lucy Danner, Virgie Anderson, Minnie Myers, Lora Weaver, 
Edith Boyer, Beulah King, Jeune King, Rebecca Anderson, 
Ethel Mummert, Gladys Rhinehart, Ella Wilt, Edith Mummert, 
Iva Mummert, Edna Price, Bertha Hull, Anna Boyer, Cora 
Bosserman, and Mary Volland. 

The Ladies' Aid Society meets weekly, and has for its 
primary purpose the making of quilts, comforts, aprons, 
bonnets, pillow cases, etc. The funds realized from these 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



219* 




Ladies' Aid Society — Upper Conewago Congregation 



efforts have been contributed to missions and used locally. 
Locally, the Aid has paid for the papering and painting of 
some of our church houses, and for the installation of electric 
lights in three of them. They have furnished a mother's room 
in our East Berlin church, and a dormitory room at 
Elizabethtown College. They have also purchased dishes for 
the church, and have donated various books to our ministers. 
They make donations to the Children's Home and to the 
Brethren's Home, and give assistance to some of the poor in 
the community. 

In a council meeting held August 26, 1916, it was decided 
that all Sunday school superintendents chosen thereafter 
should be elected by the church. Prior to this time the super- 
intendent of the East Berlin school was the only one elected 
in this manner. This accounts for the fact that the records of 
superintendents and their assistants given for Mummerts, 
Hampton, Latimore, Trostles, and Bakers were previously 
referred to as having been incomplete. 

In 1917, Brother Charles Staub came to our congregation 
as a deacon, by certificate. Brother Staub serves as a deacon 
today, although, due to illness, he has not been able to attend 
service. 

In 1918 the Upper Conewago Congregation and the 
Brethren Cemetery Association of the Upper Conewago 
Congregation applied for, and were granted charters by the 
Adams County Circuit Court of Appeals. 



220 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

George Hull and J. Monroe Danner were elected to the 
ministry on September 7, 1918. 

On August 30, 1919, Ervin Baum and Charles Lehigh 
were elected deacons. Brother Baum serves, faithfully, in the 
same capacity at the present time. Brother Lehigh has since 
moved from our congregation. 

On August 27, 1921, it was decided to discontinue meet- 
ings at the Baker house. Through the removal of some 
Brethren families, and a general lack of interest, the 
attendance had dwindled to practically nothing. 

At the same council meeting, E. K. Leatherman, a 
minister, who had moved into our congregation, presented his 
certificate. Thus another name was added to our list of 
ministers. 

On December 24, 1921, S. M. Lehigh and W. G. Group 
were ordained as elders. Brother Group continues to serve 
as an elder in our congregation and at Marsh Creek. Elder 
Lehigh served us until 1932, when he moved to the Pleasant 
Hill Congregation. Upper Conewago lost a conscientious and 
faithful elder when Brother Lehigh moved from our territory. 

On May 22, 1922, after having served for about seventeen 
years as presiding elder, C. L. Baker tendered his resignation, 
which was accepted by the congregation. 

Elder Baker was prominent in the affairs of the districts, 
as well as in his home congregation. He served at various 
times as a delegate to District and Annual Meetings, and also 
served on the Standing Committee of Annual Conference. He 
was a trustee of Elizabethtown College for a number of years. 

As a successor to C. L. Baker, the congregation elected 
Samuel S. Miller as its presiding elder on May 22, 1922. 

In October, 1925, the District Meeting was held at the 
Mummert house, and in August, 1927, the ministerial and 
Sunday school meeting was held in the same church. 




Elder Samuel S. Miller and Wife 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



221 



On November 6, 1927, our Hampton church was 
destroyed by fire. This was the second destruction of the par- 
ticular church by the elements, the first having occurred in 
1874, by storm. The church was rebuilt in 1929, largely from 
materials salvaged in tearing down the Baker meeting house 
where services had been discontinued in 1919. The dedica- 
tion services of the reconstructed Hampton house were in 
charge of Elder C. D. Bonsack. 

On May 5, 1928, Brother Bucher Harlacher was ordained 
an elder, and on December 8, of the same year, Paul Wagner 
and James Sheaffer were elected deacons. Each of these 
brethren serve us faithfully in the respective offices today. 

Two additional members were added to our official body 
as of May 3rd, 1930. Brother Paul Miller came to us as a 
minister, and Brother Earl Witter as a deacon. Both continue 
to serve us faithfully in these capacities. 

On August 20, 1935, Brother Bruce Anderson was elected 
to the ministry. He was installed a year later, and continues 
to serve us actively and faithfully today. Brother Anderson 
is also a teacher of one of our mixed classes at the East Berlin 
Sunday School. 

On November 14, 1935, Brother J. Monroe Danner and 
Brother George Hull were ordained as elders. Both brethren 
serve faithfully as such today. 

By the time of our annual council in August, 1938, Elder 

Samuel S. Miller realized 
that his weakened physical 
condition would not allow 
him to continue in the office 
of presiding elder any 
longer. He served in that 
office, faithfully, for about 
sixteen years. 

On August 27, 1938, J. 
Monroe Danner was elected 
presiding elder of Upper 
Conewago, and serves faith- 
fully in that calling today. 

In the same year a 
movement was started to re- 
open the Trostle meeting 
house. As services had been 
discontinued there in 1912, 
much work was required to 
put the house back into a 
usable condition. Some of 
the active and faithful mem- 
bers of our church took over 
the work of repairing and 
repainting the house, and 




Presiding Elder J. Monroe Danner 

and Wife 



222 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 



clearing the grounds, and on August 27, 1939, rededicatory 
services were held. So, after having stood unused for about 
27 years, its walls again resounded to prayers, hymns, and the 
preached word. The committee in charge of soliciting funds 
for the remodeling of the Trostle house consisted of the 
following brethren: Solomon Peifer, John Pentz, Charles E. 
Weaver, Bucher Harlacher, and Glen Boyer. 

On October 5, 1940, Glen Boyer and Titus Sipe were 
elected deacons. Both serve us as deacons today, and both 
are Sunday school teachers at East Berlin. On the same date 
Truman Grogan, a minister, came to us by certificate. In 




Official Board — Upper Conewago Congregation 

addition to being a minister he also serves as a Sunday school 

teacher. 

Upper Conewago's present official board is as follows: 
Elder in charge, J. Monroe Danner; past presiding elder, 
Samuel S. Miller; other elders, W. G. Group, D. Bucher 
Harlacher, George W. Hull ; ministers, Bruce Anderson, Paul 
Miller, Truman Grogan; deacons, William E, Brough (died 
March 16, 1941), S. H. Baker, George Harbold, Charles 
Weaver, Ervin Baum, Charles Staub, James Sheaffer, Earl 
Witter, Harry Mummert, Paul Wagner, Lewis King, Luther 
Baum, Titus Sipe, Glen Boyer. 

Sunday school organizations are: East Berlin — Superin- 
tendent, D. E. Brandt; assistant superintendent, Titus Sipe; 
secretary, Dorothy Danner; treasurer, Robert Zeigler. 
Mummerts, Hampton, and Latimore — Superintendent, Earl 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



223 



Witter; assistant superintendent, Paul Miller, Jr.; secretary, 
Phyllis Witter; treasurer, Firmin Nitchman. 

Our present church clerk and corresponding- secretary is 
Sister Bertha Hull; our general church treasurer is D. E. 
Brandt ; and our ministerial fund treasurer is Glen Boyer. 

Our congregation holds regular Sunday morning serv- 
ices in four of its church houses in a rotating order, with an 
additional Sunday afternoon service at the Trostle house 
every fourth Sunday, and an additional Sunday evening 
service at the East Berlin house every fourth Sunday. 

Sunday school is held in the East Berlin house each 




Singing Class — Upper Conewago Congregation 



Sunday, and also at the church where preaching services 
happen to be held on that particular day. 

Two of our Sunday school classes at East Berlin are 
organized, and both hold monthly class meetings. 

We have a mid-week prayer meeting, and a mid-week 
meeting of the Singing Class. We have also been very suc- 
cessful, recently, in conducting doctrinal teaching classes, 
peace conferences and Bible conferences. Even our largest 
church at Mummerts could not hold all of the people at our 
last Bible conference. 

Upper Conewago still clings to a conservative course. 
It has withstood the storms of time for a period of 92 years, 
and stands today as a living testimony to the untiring efforts 
of our forefathers who upheld for us high standards of 



224 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Christianity. May we, by the Grace of God, preserve this rich 
heritage for our children. 

The historical committee of Upper Conewago Congrega- 
tion consisted of John H. Myers, chairman; Bruce Anderson, 
William E. Brough, Elder D. B. Harlacher, and Sister Edna 
Price. 

The number of members is 333. 



WAYNESBORO CONGREGATION 

The Waynesboro Congregation was organized in 1922 
but its history dates back 51 years before its organization. 
At that time (1871) the Antietam Congregation of the German 
Baptist Brethren of the Middle District of Pennsylvania bought 
of the Evangelical Lutheran and Presbyterian churches in 
Waynesboro, the Union Church on South Church Street which 
was on a portion of the ground occupied by our present church 
edifice. 

The plot of land on which this church stood was a part of 
a larger tract purchased by proprietary warrant from the 
colonial governor of Pennsylvania by John Wallace, Sr., in 
1794. Sometime after the death of his father, John Wallace, 
Jr., acquired this land. About 1798, when plotting out the 
village of Wallacetown (later Waynesburg, now Waynes- 
boro), he donated lots number 69 and 70 on Hagerstown 
Street (now South Church Street) for a union meeting house. 
A clause in the original deed states if the ground were ever 
used for any other than church purposes it should revert to the 
Wallace heirs. 

The first building in Waynesboro erected for purely 
church purposes was the log church built on this plot in 1809. 
It was built by the Evangelical Lutheran, German Reformed 
and Old School Presbyterian denominations. On account of 
insufficient funds the building stood for several years without 
windows, doors and flooring. Services were held in it during 
this time but it needed a thorough cleansing before each serv- 
ice because animals sought shelter therein from heat and 
storm. In 1815 or 1817 a committee of two was appointed 
from each of the three denominations to solicit funds to finish 
the building. It was completed about 1817. For a while serv- 
ices were held in this church without stoves. The people took 
with them heated stones or some other article to keep them- 
selves warm in cold weather. Then large ten-plate stoves 
were used in which cord length wood sticks were burned. 
When fire was in its prime condition, those near the stoves 
nearly roasted while others in remote corners were merely 
warm. (Gleaned from a History of the Presbyterian Church 
of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, by Miss Sallie C. Amberson.) 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 225 



In 1827 the Reformed congregation, having built a 
church of their own, ceased to worship there. In 1829, the 
log church was torn down and in 1830 a new building was 
erected by the Lutheran and Presbyterian congregations. 
They used that as a union church until 1867 when the Presby- 
terian congregation built a church of its own. The following 
year the Lutheran congregation built its own church. 

When the Union Church was built a bell was put on it. 
Sometime later it was removed and placed in the yard to the 
right of the front entrance. (Information from F. S. Boerner.) 
An agreement in the possession of our church custodian of 
documents gives the following information concerning the dis- 
position of this bell : In 1868 the Old School Presbyterian 
Church sold to the Evangelical Lutheran Church their interest 
in the bell and cupola for $100.00. The agreement to this sale 
was signed by: 

Lutheran Committee — George Summers, John Walter, 
William P. Weagley; Old School Presbyterian Committee — 
James Burns, Robert McElvaney, Joseph Dougles. 

From the deed of transfer to the Antietam Congregation, 
we learn that : 

On July 14, 1868, an agreement was made between the 
Evangelical Lutheran and the Old School Presbyterian congre- 
gations to sell the Union Church at public sale in three years — 
"provided the contemplated place of worship of the 
Evangelical Lutheran congregation shall be ready for 
occupancy by then". 

On July 12, 1871, the church with a plot of ground having 
a frontage of 62 feet and a depth of 103 feet was sold at public 
auction to the Antietam Congregation of the German Baptist 
Brethren (now Church of the Brethren) for $1,200. The 
larger portion of the original plot was retained for a burying 
ground by the Evangelical Lutheran and Presbyterian 
congregations. 

On October 23, 1871, charters of incorporation were 
granted to the Evangelical Lutheran congregation of 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, and to the Presbyterian congrega- 
tion (the qualifying words "Old School" being dropped) of 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

A deed of transfer was made to the Antietam Congrega- 
tion on November 28, 1871, signed by the following trustees: 

Evangelical Lutheran Congregation — Jason Bell, Martin 
Geiser, F. I. Filbert, G. W. McGinley, Daniel Tritle, John 
Johnston; Presbyterian Congregation — John Philip, M. A. 
Gordon, T. H. West, W. Hammet, William A. Reid, Joseph 
Price. Signed in presence of J. Burns Amberson, N.P. 

The church built in 1830 — an artistic edifice of colonial 
design — was made of stone covered with rough cast plaster. 
Its beauty was enhanced by its simplicity and the two pillars 
on the porch. There was no cellar under it. It was heated 



226 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Church of the Brethren, Waynesboro 

Built as a union church in 1830 ; bought by Antietam Congregation in 1871 ; 

razed in 1903. 




Interior of Church of the Brethren, Razed in 190 



n 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 227 

with stoves, the fuel being kept in a shed in the yard. Upon 
remodeling the interior of it, the ministers' long reading desk 
was placed on an elevated platform. Back of this desk were 
two chairs with a long settee between them. As the ministers 
entered the church, they took their places on the pulpit 
according to their age in the ministry, the presiding elder, 
who was usually the oldest, occupied the chair on the north. 
When there were more ministers present than there was seat- 
ing room on the platform some of them sat on the short front 
pews at the side of the pulpit from whence they could view 
the audience. The deacons also sat on these short pews and 
ofttimes one of them read the Scripture lesson. On the long 
pulpit desk, there were Bibles, hymnals and often a pitcher 
of water and a tumbler. Other articles were placed on a shelf 
under the desk which was not visible to the audience. The 
pews were not as comfortable as those we now have. The 
backs (18 inches high) were almost perpendicular to the 
seats which had a depth of 11| inches. The balcony in the 
rear was used in later years for the beginners and primary 
Sunday school children — a curtain being used to separate it 
from the room below. The Sunday school library books were 
in a cupboard which stood between the two entrance doors. 
This cupboard is now used for dishes in the kitchen of our 
church by the Always Willing Sunday School Class. 

Infrequent church services were held. From April, 1883, 
until 1898, services were held in the morning of every fourth 
Sunday and probably in the evening of every Sunday. From 
April, 1898, until April, 1909, morning services were held 
every alternate Sunday. Since April 18, 1909, preaching- 
services have been held every Sunday morning and evening. 
(This information has been gleaned from the minute books 
of the Antietam Congregation.) 

Among the Brethren families living in Waynesboro about 
the time the church was bought, were those of Jacob F. Oiler, 
Jacob Adams, Frederic Harbaugh, Nathaniel Crouse, A. E. 
Price, Josiah Fahrney, Benjamin Price, Samuel Koontz, 
Peter Geiser. 

In the early days ample hitching ground for horses was 
needed because many members drove in from the country on 
"preaching Sunday". A plot of ground 23 feet deep in front 
of the church which extended northward along the stora 
fence of the burial ground to a distance of 166 feet was used 
for this purpose. Horses were tied to iron rings which were 
fastened in the stone fence of the graveyard and to chains 
which were suspended between posts in front of the church. 

In 1895, the Antietam Congregation bought of the 
Geiser Manufacturing Company for hitching purposes, part 
(150x42 feet) of the plot which we use today for parking cars. 
In 1927, the Waynesboro Congregation bought of the same 
company the remainder (50x41 feet) of this plot. Three 



228 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

hundred dollars was paid for the first plot and $225 for the 
second. The trustees of the Antietam Congregation in 1895 
to whom the plot was deeded were : J. M. Newcomer, J. M. 
Stover, Josiah Burger, Benjamin F. Barr, C. Michael Jacobs. 
It is of interest to note that none of these were residents of 
Waynesboro. The first two lived near Welty church, the third 
and fifth were near Price church and the fourth lived in the 
Marsh district. 

At sometime, it was discovered that the hitching space 
(23x62 feet) in front of the church was not included in the 
1871 deed to our church. This strip between the curb and our 
church property then belonged to the Lutheran congrega- 
tion — the Presbyterian having sold its right. Hence, in 1903, 
when we bought additional ground (tract #2, formerly part 
of the graveyard) we purchased this strip as well as a strip of 
11.9 feet to the rear, making our total frontage 166 feet, the 
depth being 138 feet. Price paid was $2,125. 

The old church edifice was razed in 1903. A new brick 
building with a frontage of 101 feet and a depth of 68 feet 
was erected in 1903-1904 at the cost of $18,000. The corner- 
stone of the 1830 Union Church, together with the Bible and 
coins which it contained, was placed in the southwest corner 
of the Sister's Aid room. D. M. Baker was presiding elder at 
that time with John B. Ruthrauff as his assistant. While the 
church was being erected, services were held (from July, 

1903, to October, 1904) in the Christian Church on West Main 
Street, which was then the property of the Saint Paul 
Reformed Church. 

The church was dedicated at 10 :30 A.M. on October 2, 

1904. Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh preached the dedicatory sermon, 
using as his text Luke 4 : 14-23. "At the Sunday school session 
in the afternoon teaching of the lessons by classes was 
omitted. " The following ministers gave addresses on different 
phases of the lesson which was based on II Kings 2:12-22: 
William A. Anthony, of Shady Grove, Pennsylvania ; W. S. 
Reichard, of Hagerstown, Maryland ; A. L. B. Martin, of 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ; J. J. Ellis, of Baltimore, Maryland ; 
John Miller, of Oakville, Pennsylvania. C. R. Oellig gave a 
historical sketch of the Antietam Congregation. At the Young 
Peoples service in the evening, the topic "Indifference" 
(Haggai 1:24) was discussed by W. I. Book, of Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, and J. J. Ellis, of Baltimore, Maryland. The 
theme of Dr. Brumbaugh's evening sermon was "Characteri 
istics of Christ as a Teacher", based on Matthew 7 :28-29. 

The building committee of the new church was composed 
of D. W. Hess, chairman; John E. Demuth, secretary; J. J. 
Oiler, treasurer; A. E. Price, Henry Rinehart, Joseph F. 
Emmert and Joseph E. Rohrer. 

At the church business meeting of October 22, 1904, the 
following vote of thanks was extended to the committee : 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



229 




Waynesboro Church, Dedicated October, 1904 




Sunday School Building of Waynesboro Church 






1 



230 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Vote of Thanks to the Building Committee 

Resolution offered by C. R. Oellig — 

"Inasmuch as we, the Antietam Congregation, do highly 
appreciate the services rendered to the church by the Building 
Committee and as we desire to show our appreciation for theii 
excellent services, I move that we unanimously extend ou 
vote of thanks to the Committee as follows : 

"To Brother D. W. Hess as chairman, for so ably guiding 
the Committee and holding it together during his entire term 
of office. For giving the church the advantage of having the 
purchasing done through him as a contractor and builder and 
for his good judgment in the same as well as in all other 
matters pertaining to the work. 

"To Brother Henry Rinehart for his work as a committee- 
man, for his deep interest in the progress of the work, giving 
nearly all of his time for an entire year with the workmen, 
watching that everything should be done to the best possible 

advantage. 

"To Brother J. J. Oiler as treasurer, for his wisdom in 
the management of the finances and his personal efforts and 
success in securing subscriptions to the Building Fund. For 
his alertness and the deep interest manifested by him in all 
the features of the work and for assuming the responsibility 
in company with Brother M. E. Sollenberger of purchasing- 
additional ground, thus procuring the present site for our 
church building. 

"To Brother A. E. Price for his active interest in com- 
mittee work, for his time spent and his untiring efforts in 
directing the execution of the work and for his sound judg- 
ment in all matters, especially in the arrangement of the 
conveniences for the worshippers. 

"To Brother J. E. Rohrer for special interest in securing 
modern conveniences and to whom much credit belongs for 
the interior arrangement and furnishings in general which 
contribute to the comfort and convenience of the Sunday 
school and the church attendants. 

"To Brother J. F. Emmert for his activity in connection 
with the work of the committee. For the practical suggestions 
he contributed of sound judgment as to the selection of 
material and as to arrangement of conveniences and for his 
anxiety that all things should be done the best for the church 
and all concerned. 

"To Brother J. E, Demuth as secretary, for his efficiency 
in caring for all the records of the work and his interest in the 
church's welfare in all things, that nothing should be done 
that would not in every way be satisfactory to all concerned. 

"To the Committee as a whole for sacrificing time and 
giving the church the benefit of their experiences. For exer- 
cising their best judgment in all things. For the admirable 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



231 



manner in which they have performed their duties devolving 
upon them unto completion of the work, giving to us this 
most substntial, spacious and comfortable church house in 
which to worship God for years to come." 

The debt on the church was liquidated on October 12, 
1906. 



Report of Treasurer, J. J. Oiler, of the Building Committee — 

October 12, 1906 

"He said the debt was still about $3,000 and 10 out of 15 
of the committee have reported with cash and promises to the 
amount of $1,201. He had the promise of about $150 more. 
Brother Abram Price said in order to get the debt paid, he 
would obligate himself to pay $250 more and calculating that 
the other five committee men would at least bring in another 
$100, making a total of $1,700, leaving a balance of $1,300. 
The treasurer then made a proposition that if $700 was raised 
in council, he would see to the balance and if more than $700 
came in, the balance would go into the treasury. The $700 
was raised and the debt was considered paid." (Minutes of 
Antietam Congregation.) 

The membership of the Antietam Congregation of the 
German Baptist Brethren Church at that time was 560. About 
300 of that number were residents of Waynesboro. It has 
been said that 50 years previous, but four members lived in 
Waynesboro and that in 1878 the resident membership was 80. 
(Brethren Almanacs, 1905 and 1887.) 

A great deal of credit for this growth in membership was 
due to the aggressive spirit of Elder Jacob F. Oiler, who in 
1872, a few months after the purchase of the church, organ- 
ized a Sunday school in it. This was the first Brethren 
Sunday school in what is now known as the Southern District 




Elder Jacob F. Oller and Wife 



232 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

of Pennsylvania of the Church of the Brethren. Because of his 
interest in the young people and the encouragement he gave 
them, many came into the church and the first Young People's 
meeting in our Brotherhood (outside of a college town) was 
begun in this church between 1888 and 1892. Probably the 
greatest personality back of our missionary organizations was 
that of Brother Oiler who extended to Wilbut Stover a cordial 
greeting when in 1891 he came to Waynesboro in much need 
of encouragement and full of zeal for missions which he con- 
sidered the "First Great Work of the Church". The stimulus 
which this congregation received at that time was later 
fostered by his son, Joseph J. Oiler — through whose mis- 
sionary fervor the congregation was greatly blessed for many 
years. Through their influence, many young people entered 
Juniata College of which they were trustees. For several 
years many of our people availed themselves of the privilege 
of attending the four weeks Annual Bible Institute at Juniata 
College. In January, 1896, twenty-two persons went to the 
institute at Juniata College. Since the founding of Elizabeth- 
town College, some of our older folks go there for the Bible 

Institute. 

Another personality which had much to do with the early 
ingathering and spiritual encouragement of our young people 
was Elder Henry C. Early who held four evangelistic meetings 

(1888, 1892, 1895, ) in this church when many young 

people accepted Christ. 

For many years there was a sentiment among some of the 
members of the Antietam Congregation living in Waynesboro 
that it would be advantageous to the town church to have a 
separate organization. The growth of this sentiment, together 
with some grievances, caused them to petition the Standing 
Committee of the Annual Meeting of 1916 to send a com- 
mittee to our church. In September, 1916, the following com- 
mittee visited the church: P. S. Miller, chairman; David 
Metzler, writing clerk; P. J. Blough, reading clerk; L. T. 
Holsinger and I. W. Taylor. After careful consideration of 
the questions involved, they gave some spiritual admonition 
to the church and recommended that the congregation be 
divided. They also stressed the need of pastoral care for the 
Waynesboro church. Their report was unanimously accepted. 

The report of the committee not having been complied 
with, the previous petitioners asked Annual Meeting of 1921 
to send us another committee. In July, 1921, a committee 
composed of J. M. Moore, David Metzler, and J. W. Lear 
came "to study the conditions that troubled the congregation 
and to assist in constructing a program that will give relief". 
They found that the officials had been remiss in not following 
the recommendations of the committee of 1916. They advised 
that the congregation be divided and proposed that after the 
acceptance of their report their committee would assist the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 233 

two congregations in creating sufficient organization to guide 
in working out the necessary details arising from the change. 
Their report was rejected 56 for and 107 against. A vote of 
those present who lived in corporate limits of the borough 
was taken — 54 for and 62 against. 

Again in 1922 the petitioners asked for a committee from 
the Annual Conference. In July the committee which had 
been there the previous year came again and recommended : 
"That the care of the church shall be in the hands of the com- 
mittee until an elder can be satisfactorily provided. That 
immediate action be taken to provide a pastor for the 
Waynesboro membership. That the congregation be divided, 
and that six months be given to mature the most advantageous 
plan of division. " Their report was adopted by majority 
vote — 78 voting for and 75 against. 

It was then decided that the sub-committee of the day, 
composed of six petitioners and six from the body of the 
church, should confer with the Annual Meeting committee 
immediately after the service with a view of securing a 
pastor — preferably a member of the committee. This sub- 
committee asked Brother Moore to take the pastoral work for 
one year and offered him a salary of $1,800 and house rent. 
Brother Moore asked for time for consideration. In a few 
weeks he reported favorably and on October 20 began his 
pastoral work with us. 

In the afternoon of December 7, 1922, the Antietam 
Congregation met in special council "to carry into effect the 
division of the congregation according to the recommendation 
of the recent Annual Meeting committee. It was decided 
that the new congregation be called the Waynesboro Congre- 
gation and that the borough limits should be the boundary 
line between the two congregations with the exception of the 
northwest boundary which should be left to the decision of a 
committee of ten, composed of five from each congregation". 

Because of this unsettled boundary line and other 
problems, an advisary Annual Meeting committee was granted 
the Waynesboro Congregation during 1923-1924 and 1924- 
1925. The boundary line was not settled until December, 
1925, when at the request of the two congregations, an Annual 
Meeting committee composed of J. A. Dove, I. Wm. Miller, 
and A. S. Thomas came to us and decided that the borough 
limits should be the congregational line on the northwest 
corner as well as on all other sides. This report was accepted 
on December 2, 1925. 

On Thursday evening, December 7, 1922, at 7 o'clock the 
members of the Church of the Brethren in Waynesboro met 
in the church to effect the organization of the Waynesboro 
Congregation. Elders C. L. Baker and Daniel Bowser were 
present to assist. 



234 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



The following officers and committees were elected by 
ballot: Elder, J. M. Moore; Clerk, Earl E. Snader; Treasurer, 
W. J. Snader; Chorister, A. H. Ressler; Gospel Messenger 
Agent, Ira L. Wingert; Gospel Messenger Correspondent, 
Mrs. J. M. Moore ; Trustees, J. J. Oiler, Edwin E, Snader, M. E. 
Sollenberger; Auditing Committee, H. B. Rinehart, C. B. 
Latshaw, Daniel Good ; Finance Board, John E, Demuth, C. W. 
Reichard, B. F. Welty, D. G. H. Lesher, Warren Snader, W. L. 
Widdowson, John Kauffman, M. E. Sollenberger, Earl E. 
Snader, Lloyd Hoover, Frank Boerner, H. B. Rinehart, Daniel 
Good, Victor Koontz, J. J. Oiler. 

The following committees were appointed by the elder: 
Child Rescue, H. M. Stover, Mrs. J. J. Oiler, Sudie M. 
Wingert; Temperance and Purity, C. D. Snider, William 
Kauffman, Myra Bohn; Ministerial, C. R. Oellig, W. J. Snader, 
Harvey E. Price ; Ushers, A. R. Deardorff, C. B. Latshaw, 
Charles Oellig, Milton B. Horst, Howard S. Snider, Jesse 
Geiser, Russell Peiffer, John Kauffman, Fred Fenninger, 
Nelson Gingrich, Arthur Snider, Laban Wingert; Assistant 
Ushers, John Harshman, Ralph Leiter, Rudolph Kauffman, 
Earl Heefner. 

It was decided that the providing of a finance secretary 
be left in the hands of the finance board and that the 
benevolent board be continued. 

Brother Moore, having begun his pastoral work in our 
midst on October 20, 1922, became the pastor of the 
Waynesboro Congregation 

upon its organization on ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
December 7, 1922. He was 
re-elected for periods of 
two, two and three years 
respectively. In August, 
1930, he severed his relation 
with us, having accepted a 
call to the First Church of 
the Brethren of Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Brother Levi K. Zeigler 
began his pastoral work with 
us in September, 1930, for 
a term of three years. At 
the morning service of 
September 7, he was in- 
stalled by Elder W. G. 
Group, assisted by Elder 
C. L. Baker and C. R. Oellig. 
He was re - elected three 
times for periods of three 
years each. In June of 1935 
his consecrated wife, Grace Elder James M. Moore and Wife 




Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



235 




Elder Levi K. Ziegler and Wife 



K. Ziegler, was called to her eternal home. In the fall of 
1936 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Mamie Keller Leiter. 
Due to Brother and Sister Ziegler having responded to an 
emergency call to become director and dietician, respectively, 
of the Civilian Public Service camp near Kane, Pennsylvania, 
they presented their resignations from all offices to the church 
business meeting of July 14, 1941, which became effective one 
week later. At the church's request Brother Ziegler retained 

the office of presiding elder of 
the congregation. 

At a special congrega- 
tional meeting on September 3, 
1941, Brother George L. 
Detweiler was elected pastor 
of the congregation to become 
effective as soon as convenient 
to him. Brother Detweiler 
expects to begin his work at 
Waynesboro on December 1, 
1941. 

During a four year period 
from November, 1928, Miss 
Emma Miller served as church 
visitor and pastor's assistant. 
An unnamed member paid her 
salary during the first year, 
after which the church paid 
one-half of it. During June, 
July, and August of 1940 
Donald Snider, a student of 
Elder George L. Detweiler, Bethany Biblical Seminary, 

Pastor, served as associate pastor. 







rH 




<D 




XJ 




«tf 




£ 




tt! 




W 




,__ 




^ 




ri 




W 




•» 




rH 




o» 




T3 




• rH 




rH 




w 




T3 




P— ^ 




03 




G 




O 




Q 




• • 




+j 




x 




bJD 


£ 


• i— i 


o 


rH 


►—I 




H 


o 


< 


+J 






tf 


<L> 


O 




£ 


»s 


o 


W 


U 






<X> 


o 


W 


tf 


C 


o 


• i— « 


n 




w 


• #s 


K 


r* 


!z; 


s 


^ 


• 


H 


• 


ffi ! 


H 






^H 


fa 


0> 


o 


T3 




F" * 


w 


w 


& 






bJD 


TO 
1— 1 


'a; 
O 



■ 
r-l 

3 

N 

rH 



O 



-a 

•rH 

rH 

o 

S-H 

o» 

h-1 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 237 

Resident ministers at the time of organization were : C R 
Uellig, H. M. Stover (who in 1931 removed his membership 
to the Antietam Congregation), and W. C. Wertz. In 1936 
H. C. Muck was received by letter from the Antietam 
Congregation. David Snider was licensed to preach on July 
22, 1924. This license was renewed four times for periods of 
one year each. From September, 1927, to June, 1930, the 
congregation assisted him with his school expenses On 
December 27, 1938, Donald Snider was licensed to preach 
On September 6, 1939, he was installed in the ministry. EarJ 
Snader was licensed to preach on December 31, 1931 His 
license was renewed October, 1940, and installed Dec. 5, 1941. 

The following deacons were among the charter members : 
Isaiah Hollenberger, 1884; John C. Demuth, 1892; Abraham 
Heefner, 1905; Edwin E. Snader, 1905; A. M. Rebok, 1907* 
Ira L. Wingert, 1911; Clarence Dick, 1914; George P 
Cashman, 1917; Walter West, 1917; W. H. Demuth, 1917; 
Earl E. Snader, 1920 — (each one elected in the year following 
his name). C. W. Reichard, 1898 ; George Smith, 1919; Edwin 
Spangler, 1921; Thomas A. Albaugh, 1921 — (each one 
received by letter in the Antietam Congregation in the year 
following his name). Since our organization, the following 
deacons have transferred their membership to this congrega- 
tion: Allen D. Hoover, 1923; Luther H. Leiter, 1927; Jacob 
Etter, 1927 ; A. H. Ressler, 1929 ; J. J. Berger, 1932 ; J. J. Price, 
1936; John Kell, 1940. The following have been elected 
deacons by the Waynesboro Congregation: on April 23, 
1925— H. B. Rinehart, Raymond Hale, H. C. Geist, J. J. Oiler, 
W. J. Snader; on June 26, 1930— S. Allison Benedict, Milton 
B. Horst, W. L. Widdowson and M. E, Sollenberger; on 
January 13, 1938— A. R. Deardorff, H. A. Good, John 
Kauffman and C. A. Snider. On September 6, 1939, the first 
three named of the latter group and their wives were installed 
with the laying on of hands. M. J. Brougher officiated, 
assisted by H. M. Stover, J. I. Thomas and H. C. Muck. C. A. 
Snider and wife did not present themselves for installation. 

We have lost by death the following : Abraham Heefner, 
1929 ; G. P. Cashman, 1931 ; J. J. Oiler, 1936 ; C. W. Reichard, 
1937; H. C. Geist, 1937; Earl E. Snader, 1938; J. J. Berger, 
1940; A. H. Ressler, 1941. Letters of transfer have been 
granted to Isaiah Hollenberger, Walter West, W. H. Demuth, 
George Smith, Edwin Spangler, Thomas A. Albaugh, Allen D. 
Hoover, Luther H. Leiter. 

The personnel of our official board is : Presiding Elder, 
Levi K. Ziegler; Church Clerk, Anna Bushman; Ministers, 
Elders C. R. Oellig and H. C. Muck, W. C. Wertz, Donald 
Snider, Earl Snader; Deacons, Edwin E. Snader, A. M. Rebok, 
Ira L. Wingert, Clarence Dick, H. B. Rinehart, Raymond Hale, 
W. J. Snader, Jacob Etter, S. Allison Benedict, Milton B. 
Horst, W. L. Widdowson, M. E. Sollenberger, J. J. Price, A. R. 



238 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

Deardorff, H. A. Good, John E. Kauffman, C. A. Snider, 

John Kell. 

The charter members of our congregation numbered 4Zd. 
Our membership on January 1, 1941, was 863. Of our charter 
members 28 were descendants of Alexander Mack through his 
son, John, and a grandson, William, the son of Alexander, Jr. ; 
21 were descendants of pioneer William Stover, the first per- 
manent resident elder of the Antietam Congregation, and 15 
were descendants of pioneer John Jacob Price who emigrated 
to America in 1719 with the first group of Brethren from 

Germany. . . . 

In the spring of 1923 the membership was given a privi- 
lege which they long desired — that of having their first Love 
Feast and Communion service in the Waynesboro church. 
(Previous to that we went, for these services, one mile north 
to the Price church in the spring and six miles south to the 
Welty church in autumn.) At our church business meeting 
in the fall of 1927, it was decided to adopt the individual com- 
munion cups. They were first used in the spring of 1928. 
Mrs. H. B. Rinehart presented the service in honor of her sons, 

Edwin and Aldus. 

On April 6, 1923, the house with lot (41 by 207 feet) 
adjoining the church property was bought for a parsonage at 
the cost of $7,205. The Always Willing Sunday School Class 
furnished much of the parsonage, (list of things placed in the 
hands of the church custodian). The parsonage was 
remodeled in 1925. While this was being done the pastor's 
family lived in some of the Sunday school rooms and the 
kitchen of the church. A slight fire occurred in the basement 
of the church during this time. 

In the latter part of 1924, a two story Sunday school 
building, having movable partitions, was added to the church 
at an approximate cost of $40,000. The building committee 
for this was Daniel Good, D. G. H. Lesher, M. E. Sollenberger, 
J. S. Stevenson and W. C. Wertz. At that time the walls and 
ceilings of the entire church were refinished, a new vapor 
heating system was installed, (the first was hot air), gas was 
put in the kitchen, new ceiling lights donated by the Men's 
Chorus were put in the church and Sunday school auditoriums. 
The cornerstone for this new addition was donated by F. S. 
Boerner's Sunday school class. In the process of remodeling, 
the cornerstone of the Union Church of 1830 was moved to 
the southeast corner of this building. It contains the old Bible 
and coins which were placed in it in 1830. Dedicatory serv- 
ices were held January 18, 1925, at 10:45 A.M., 2:30 and 
7:00 P.M. Dr. C. C. Ellis, of Juniata College, preached at 
each service. Special music was furnished by the Men's 
Chorus with C. D. Snider as leader and by the Ladies' 
Quartette (Rello Oiler, Lettie Gearhart, Mrs. Arthur Snider 
and Mrs. Howard Snider). 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 239 

A baptistry was installed in the church in 1924 at the 
expense of J. J. Oiler. In 1926 a piano was purchased for the 
auditorium. 

In October, 1929, a beautiful new dark Wilton velvet 
carpet was put in the church auditorium and Sunday school 
assembly room. While the carpet was being laid the pews 
were cleaned and refinished. At the same time an appro- 
priate offering table was donated to the church by the Always 
Willing Circle composed of Mrs. Kate Angle, Misses Mary and 
Mattie Benedict, Miss Prudie Burger, Mrs. John Bushman, 
Mrs. A. R. Deardorff, Mrs. Amanda Harbaugh, Mrs. Ada 
Harris, Mrs. Elizabeth Stoner and Mrs. D. J. Shank. The 
Young People sponsored the purchase of a bulletin board in 
1927. 

In 1928 an entrance was put on the south side of the 
church and a basement room made for the use of the Boy Scout 
Troop #1 of Waynesboro (cost $696.66). 

In March, 1931, a plot of ground (166x192 feet) east of 
the church and formerly known as the old Lutheran burying 
ground (from which the graves had been removed), was pre- 
sented to the church for its use and enjoyment by Joseph J. 
Oiler and his wife, Myrtle F. Oiler, and their children, J. F., 
Rello, and J. Ezra. It was given in memory of Mr. Oiler's 
parents, Bishop Jacob F. and Elizabeth Bonebrake Oiler. In 
1934, the Young People adopted as their project the building 
of a new fence around this plot. During the following 
summer, the fence was erected. On July 14, 1935, by an 
impressive service the lawn and fence were formally dedi- 
cated "for the enjoyment of beauty, the delight of our children 
and youth, the cultivation of holy aspirations, and the worship 
of Almighty God in his own out-of-doors". This plot is used 
in the summer for the younger Sunday school children on hot 
Sunday mornings, for twilight worship service on Sunday 
evenings, and for social activities during the week. 

In the spring of 1937 a fire proof vault was built in the 
basement of the church for the protection of church records 
and the communion service. In 1940 new equipment was 
added to the kitchen, among which were two gas ranges, a 
gas plate, and a 20 gallon gas water heater. 

Since January, 1926, a four page paper, the Waynesboro 
Messenger, edited quarterly by our pastor disseminates church 
news through the congregation. 

Since our organization in 1922 the following have served 
us as evangelists: James M. Moore, H. S. Replogle, M. J. 
Brougher (twice), J. A. Robinson, Oliver Austin and wife, 
Levi Garst, Isaac Long (twice), Ernest S. CofFman, Tobias F. 
Henry (twice), John D. Ellis. 

The following meetings of district organizations have 
been held in our church : 



240 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

District Meeting— 1885, 1910, 1912, 1927. 
Ministerial— December 10, 11, 12, 1891, and November 

19, 20, 21, 1901. 

Sunday School Meeting— June 8, 1899, being the first 
District Sunday School meeting of Southern Pennsylvania. 

Ministerial and Sunday School Meeting — 1905, 1925. 

The various auxiliaries which help to forward the work 
of our church are : 

Sunday School — Organized in spring of 1872; discon- 
tinued January, 1873; reorganized April, 1873; discontinued 
and reorganized several times; continuous since the 
organization of March, 1878. 

Young People's Meetings — Between 1888 and 1892. 

Missionary Association — March, 1893. 

Ladies' Aid Society — January, 1895. 

Boy Scout — 1928 ; reorganized 1935. 

Women's Work— 1933. 

Sunday School 

In the spring of 1872 a Sunday school was organized in 
the Waynesboro church with Brother Jacob F. Oiler as super- 
intendent; D. B. Mentzer, assistant superintendent; Jacob 
Zuck, Jr., secretary; and John Garret, treasurer. "The school 
at first numbered about 30 pupils. It was continued amid 
many discouragements and with varying success until January 
12, 1873, when it was suspended until the weather should be- 
come more favorable. Some thought this a mistake. After 
a suspension of about three months the Brethren Sabbath 
School reopened on April 13, at 1 :30 P.M. under the super- 
intendency of Brother D. B. Mentzer; librarian, Isaac 
Sprenkle; secretary, Jacob Zuck, Jr." (From the minute 
book of 1873). The teachers on this reopening date were 
Lizzie Geiser, Katie Stover, Maggie Emmert, John Garret, 
Jacob Zook, Jr., and Sudie Oiler. 

This school continued several months. Because of opposi- 
tion the school was begun and discontinued at irregular 
intervals. We have no records for 1874 and 1875. There are 
records showing that it was in existence from December 10, 
1876, to February 18, 1877, also from April 29, 1877, to July 
15, 1877. It might have been continuous during all this time 
but we have no records. 

A new organization was formed March 31, 1878, when 
a new constitution was adopted and signed by 43 persons, 
since then we have had a continuous Sunday school. The 
minute book gives the following officers for 1878: Superin- 
tendent, J. H. Gehr; Assistant Superintendent, T. F. Imler; 
Librarian, J. R. Wolfkill; Assistant Librarian, George 
Boerner; Secretary and Treasurer, P. M. Snider. At present 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 241 









04t**~*?b ft *-t**&. /&L<CUUUU*, Est*/*' Csz*s yte^^^yt^est^ C2 J&+^>l*^l<*) 










a^^j^ 





I 



ft «.2 fr. 



0>T3 'in 

Q fi- 



55 

o 

H 

«i 
O 
W 

o 

55 

o 

o 

o 

M 
H 



-■ 

K 

O 

§ 

O 

m 

O 
O 

K 
o 

CO 

5* 

Q 

55 

P 

CO 



fi > 



~ ' -H ^ mi (I) 

c & M 

c is cy 

•-" ■-, — 



N 



Ph 



■• 0. 



o>.2 



•- o!> as 

CS3 0) o 



M 3 



CO 

1h 



fi^O 
o .. 

1° 



pSS'o' 



cy.Scfl 
fi^ 



Xfl X 



fi .J *■! 

• <1> >» Q. ^ 

fi§>^ 

fi ft '" 

•a * o Q 

•hH 0) „, •* 

* =* ?> *w 



.J 

Pi • 



fi 

a) 

- 



:>> o 

*-> — 

fi 



s 

+j cy 

CO . cfi 

• •-* . *rt - 

- ^ o n 
o 

0) 
BQfl. 

cy " 

u 

C 50 
o3 fi 

X fi 



.O 



en 
BO 



c 

st ^ 5 
£ to. 2 

-§ C fa 

IS 2 

I-) <D .J ft V £ 

.S3 £ fi-^O 

> fi M fn „, 

^ a mQ H; 

fi ^ 2 
ft • fi ft 12 

JT -t-> <d <Uy-> 

Q^ - ^*fi 

Q, fl , 1j-fi 

\$* A 

fi 2 J^ m : 
*■%% -« w 

. Cfi 
cy "- 1 — h ^ 

"C w ^ Q 
^ ft if +J 

Wm«3 ft ft 

«5S .^ft 1 ' 
^ •- ^ Qt3 
^ OP- O 



> - 



.. o 






ot,. 



n • cy O 

ft fi fi Rj 

-i-> . p r- cy n, 

•- < ^ • 

•^ C cy 

HIP 

fi c3 ^ 2-~ 
W {jCWc72N 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 243 

(January 1, 1941) our school has an enrollment of 590*, with 
W. C. Wertz as general superintendent. Our secretary, M. B. 
Horst, and treasurer, H. B. Rinehart, have served in these 
offices twenty-nine and thirty-five years respectively. We 
have a closely graded school (Standard A) of nine depart- 
ments: home, adult, young people, senior, intermediate, junior, 
primary, kindergarten, and nursery. The last four comprise 
the children's division. Each department holds its entire 
session in its own room with the exception of the young people 
and senior which meet together. 

The Home Department was organized in the summer of 
1902 (probably the first one in our church district). Teacher 
training work was begun in 1909. This is now under the 
supervision of the Board of Christian Education. Our first 
adult Bible classes were The Helping Hand, organized in 
February, 1911, with Rebecca Foutz as teacher, and the 
Always Willing Class, organized January, 1912, with J. J. 
Oiler as teacher. The largest class in our school is the Fidelis 
(Stoler B. Good, teacher) with an enrollment of 131*. Among 
the teachers in our school for many years was Mrs. Sarah 
Saylor, widow of Daniel P. Saylor. 

Business Sessions 

The Sunday school board, composed of the elective offi- 
cers, the pastor, the divisional superintendents and the super- 
intendents of the different departments, meets monthly during 
at least ten months of the year. From December, 1926, to 
September, 1932, this board included more persons and was 
known as the Board of Christian Education. In September, 
1932, a Board of Christian Education was created by the 
church council and a new Sunday school constitution pro- 
vided for the Sunday school board as now set up. Teachers of 
the children's division meet in quarterly conferences. 

School Activities 

The classes of the Adult and Young People's Departments 
have monthly or bi-monthly meetings. Those of the children's 
division have mid-winter and summer socials. An outing of 
the entire school is held in mid-summer. For each of four 
years (1933 to 1936 inclusive) we had a week of mid-summer 
activities at the church, during which week each department 
had an afternoon or evening meeting when programs were 
developed based on a central theme which included periods 
of worship, instruction, fellowship and recreation. When the 
weather was favorable these meetings were held on the east 
lawn of our church. Vacation Bible School was not held 



*These enrollments include only those who have been in attendance at Sunday school at least 
three times during the previous quarter. The delinquent list is kept separately. 



244 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

during those years. The last two years we have had a 
Vacation Bible School with an average attendance of 106 and 
103 respectively. 

Missions 

Our school has always been interested in others. During 
the decade between 1896 and 1906 workers from our school 
went on Sunday afternoon to Sunday school at Mount Vernon 
and Plain Hill school houses. C. R. Oellig, F. S. Boerner, H. M. 
Stover and H. P. Garner served as superintendents at the 
former place. For many years F. S. Boerner was superinten- 
dent at the latter place. (These were not under the 
jurisdiction of our local school.) 

At a special workers meeting of the Waynesboro Sunday 
School on April 22, 1917, it was decided to start a mission 
Sunday school at Mt. Joy school house near Glen Furney. 
F. K. Fenninger was elected superintendent. The furnishing 
of supplies for the school as well as the school at Wayne 
Academy was referred to the missionary committee. George 
P. Cashman's request for our school to furnish supplies for 
the Wayne Academy Sunday School suggests that he was 
superintendent of Wayne Academy school. During 1918 F. K. 
Fenninger and Earl Snader had charge of the school at Mount 
Joy. (From Records of Waynesboro Sunday School Workers 
Meetings, 1917 and 1918.) 

For missionary and benevolent purposes each class or 
department has a special fund. Through the missionary chal- 
lenge of Brother J. J. Oiler in 1925 under the auspices of the 
Missionary Association (see Missionary Association), contribu- 
tions by our school to the General Mission Board have been 
greatly increased. 

The Always Willing Sunday School Class has an African 
Mission Prayer Band Fund through which each year it con- 
tributes several hundred dollars for work in Africa. (All con- 
tributions to this fund are matched by like contributions, first 
by Mr. Oiler and now by his daughter, Miss Rello.) The 
Moore Bible Class contributes to the support of home mission 
work in North Carolina. Each Christmas the Fidelis Class 
very generously remembers the children at our Children's 
Home in Carlisle. Our school gives annual contributions 
toward the support of the foreign mission field worker for 
whom our Sunday school district has assumed responsibility. 
(At the present time this is Mrs. Stover Kulp in Africa.) 
Missions are further stressed in our school by our missionary 
and temperance secretary. 

From our first organization we have had a library. At 
the present time it contains between six and seven hundred 
volumes. 

Our school encourages our children and young people to 
go to church camp by assuming part of their expenses. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 245 

The following have served as superintendents of the 
bunday school : 

Elected 

Jacob F. Oiler 1872 (Old Minute Book) 

D. B. Mentzer 1873 (Old Minute Book) 

f J. F. Emmert 

J. H. Gehr 1878 (Old Minute Book) 

fT. F. Imler 

f J. F. Emmert 

f J. A. Maugans 

J. H. Gehr 1885, 1888, 1887 

Samuel McFerren 1888 

S. E. Dubbel 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 

1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 

H. M. Stover 1897 

M. E. Sollenberger __1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 

1902 

F. S. Boerner 1903, 1904 

D. R. Fogelsanger 1905 

M. E. Sollenberger __1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 

1910 

Emory P. Trimmer 1911 

M. E. Sollenberger __1912, 1913 

George P. Cashman 1914 

Trostle Dick 1915, 1916 

A. H. Culler 1917, 1918, 1919 

Stoler B. Good 1920, 1921, 1922 

Earl E. Snader and Assistants filled out the 
H. E. Price unexpired term caused 

by the removal from 

town of Mr. Good. 

W. C. Wertz 1923, 1924, 1925 

Stoler B. Good 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 

1930 

A. H. Ressler October 1930 

Stoler B. Good October 1931, 1932, 

1933, 1934, 1935 
W. C. Wertz October 1936, 1937, 

1938, 1939, 1940 
We are not certain of time of election nor length of time 
those marked thus (f ) served. 

Gleanings 

Extracts from "Constitution and By-Laws and Rules of 
Order of the Sabbath School of the Brethren Church of 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania". Adopted, 1872. 

Constitution 

"Article 1. This school shall be known as the Brethren 
Sabbath School of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. " 



246 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

By-Laws 

Article 1. This school shall meet every Lord's day in the 

afternoon. 

Article 2. Section 1. The word of God shall be the 

text book of the school. 

Section 2. Spelling books and primers shall be provided 

for those who are unable to read. 

Section 3. The hymns from the Harp shall be used. 

Section 5. A child's paper or some other Sunday 
school paper shall be circulated in the school, the choice of 
which shall be left to the officers and teachers of the school. 

From Secretary's Record Book of 1873 

April 13 — "The Superintendent explained the manner of 
using the Brethren or Berean Lesson Leaves. Number of 
pupils present, 37." Condition of library: 

In Out 

Volumes in Youth Library 96 33 

Volumes in Juvenile Library 63 12 

Bibles and Testaments 22 4 

Total 230 

April 20 — "Attendance 35. Number of scholars now on 
roll is 35, with prospects of more, in case all the friends of the 
cause discharge their duties faithfully in the fear of God." 

May 4 — "Attendance 67. An independent Bible Class 
was organized by Brother J. F. Oiler who proposes to give 
instruction with little or no aid from printed questions." On 
the roll at this date is the name of Mamie Shank, now Mrs. 
H. C. Geist, who is still a member of our school. 

(From the tabulated report of District Sunday School 
Secretary, J. H. Keller, for year ending December 31, 1905. 

Waynesboro Sunday School 

Total enrollment 270 

Average attendance 207 

Number of teachers 17 

Amount money raised $229.16 

Amount given to missionary and 

benevolent purposes $ 12.00 

Number of scholars converted 

during year 20 

Home department? yes 

Missionary Association of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 

The first missionary organization in this congregation of 
which we have any information was the Young Sisters' 
Missionary Circle which did some practical work by making 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 247 

garments for poor families. We do not know when it was 
organized. 

It was to a meeting of this circle that the young brethren 
were invited on March 13, 1893. At this meeting it was 
decided to form a larger organization, including both brethren 
and sisters for the purpose "of our spiritual improvement and 
toward the advancement of the missionary cause". A tem- 
porary organization was formed by electing Edith Newcomer, 
chairman, and Lizzie Hollinger, secretary. One week later a 
meeting was held at the home of May Oiler, at which time the 
constitution and by-laws for the "Missionary Association of 
the German Baptist Brethren Church of Waynesboro, 
Pennsylvania" were adopted and signed by eighteen members. 
Six weeks later the membership was twenty-one. 

For many years the meetings were held in homes on the 
first Monday evening of each month. For several years they 
were held in the church on the first Wednesday evening of 
each month. Since 1937 they have been held the first 
Wednesday evening of each quarter. The earlier meetings 
were sometimes quite lengthy, due in part to the social period 
(no eating) which followed the rendering of the program and 
which preceded the session for the consideration of new 
business. As there were no other social church functions in 
those days, this period was greatly enjoyed and did much to 
strengthen our bonds of fellowship. 

The period for new business was usually very interesting. 
It was enjoyed especially by those of an argumentative frame 
of mind because of the discussions which arose from our 
efforts to adhere closely to parliamentary rules. The rules of 
order from "Cushing's Manual for Deliberative Assemblies" 
was our guide in these sessions. "I rise to a point of order," 
was frequently heard. In one of the minutes I noted that a 
motion made by Jesse B. Emmert concerning our supporting 
a missionary on the foreign field was declared "out of order", 
because at that time he had not yet formally become a member 
of the association. 

Until 1905 the association was the governing body of our 
Sunday evening young people's meeting. For ten years com- 
mittees appointed by the association selected lists of topics for 
these meetings and had the topic cards printed. When the 
committee was appointed in 1893 it was instructed to show 
topics to some of the older members of the church for their 
approval before having the cards printed. It was through the 
association that we began having church ushers. A decision 
was made in January, 1894, that the president should privately 
appoint ushers after getting the consent of the elder to do so. 
For several years thereafter the church usher committee was 
among the president's yearly appointments. 

From the beginning our programs have been of a 
missionary educative type. During the first year two eve- 



248 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

nings were given to the study of India and one to the study of 
Japan. Other topics discussed that year were: "What is 
Missionary Work?", "Importance of Missionary Work", 
"Demand for Missionary Work", "Difficulties of Missionary 
Work", "Encouragements to Missionary Work", "How Can 
We Get Money for Missionary Work ?". During the first three 
years the association subscribed for the "Missionary Review 
of the World" from which it got help for the programs. This 
paper was discontinued in favor of the "Missionary Visitor". 
Special music had an important place on these programs. 
The rendering of music by a mixed quartet, a ladies' quartet, 
a trio and a duet in one evening shows the musical ability of 
its early members. For several years we used the women's 
foreign mission study books for some of our programs. At 
some of our meetings we consider our own mission fields and 
other missionary and evangelistic work. Sometimes we invite 
one of our missionaries on furlough to address us. Phases of 
missionary work are stressed by playlets and lantern slides. 

Probably one of the most far-reaching and worthwhile 
out-growths of the early life of our association was the 
Missionary Reading Circle, which was begun for the personal 
benefit of our own group, but through the enthusiasm of 
Brother Wilbur B. Stover it was enlarged with the object of 
creating greater missionary sentiment and zeal throughout the 
brotherhood. (See our Missionary Reading Circle.) 

During the years we have given many contributions for 
various kinds of missionary work at home and abroad. Our 
first contribution was given in June, 1893, to a sister in Kansas 
toward the erection of a church. Since then we have made 
other contributions for the same purpose in the United States, 
Asia and Europe. We have contributed to city missionary 
work in Chicago, Brooklyn and Baltimore. For many years 
we sent monthly contributions to Brother Quinlan at the latter 
place to help with his Bible school for boys. 

During the last several years we have confined our giving 
almost exclusively to the support of a worker on the foreign 
field. From the minutes of the association, we gleaned the 
following concerning this support: The suggestion that we 
support a foreign missionary was made in July, 1896. 

In November, 1898, C. C. Johnson proposed that we estab- 
lish a Missionary Endowment Fund. A committee was 
appointed which reported favorably. In May, 1900, rules 
were adopted for governing Missionary Fund of the 
Waynesboro Missionary Association. 

June, 1902 — Trustees reported $48.50 in 21 pledges, 
$41.50 by open contributions. 

November, 1902 — Trustees reported $4.25 pledged 
weekly. (Must have $5.00 per week.) 

December, 1902 — Trustees reported $4.44 pledged per 
week. 






Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



249 




J. J. Oller and Wife 



Some gave without 
pledges. Some pledged two 
cents per week. Thanks was 
extended to J. J. Oller for 
the inspiration to move more 
rapidly. (He offered to give 
toward the support of 
workers an amount equal to 
whatever the Missionary 
Association would give.) 

January, 1903 — J. J. 
Oller gave his check for 
$250 for the support of a 
missionary for one year. The 
association decided to do the 
same. 

February, 1903 — A call 
was made for volunteers to 
go from our own group or 
Sunday school. 

April, 1903 — Announce- 
ment was made that Nora 
Arnold, of Linter, Illinois, 
and Mamie Quinter, of 

Chicago, Illinois, had been selected for us to support. They 
sailed in October, 1903. Our support began January 1, 1904. 

"The Missionary Visitor" of April, 1903, gives the 
following: "The Waynesboro church has raised $500 for the 
support of a worker in India and perhaps some would be glad 
to know how it was done. In the first place a certain brother 
said to the congregation that he would do just whatever the 
Missionary Association would do towards raising funds. That 
of course was a great impetus to the movement. Then the 
Association set upon this plan. They issued a printed letter, 
a copy of which is given below, and a small collection envelope. 
Weekly, little by little, the amount has been easily raised. 

"Feeling that the command of the Master to his disciples, 
that they preach His gospel to every creature, is binding upon 
us ; and being desirous of furthering the kingdom of Christ on 
earth, we, the Missionary Association of the German Baptist 
Brethren Church of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, do hereby 
express our desire to have a worker in the field representing 
our congregation ; and, wishing each member of the church to 
have a part in this work, we solicit your aid in such weekly 
contributions as you may feel prompted to make, and recom- 
mend that contributors use the following form of promise ; the 
detachable copy to be kept by the treasurer of the fund. 

"For the purpose of locating and supporting a missionary, 
I hereby express my willingness to make a weekly contribution 
of at least cents as long as it may seem 



250 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

wise to continue the fund, or as long as my circumstances may 
allow." 

As a personal token of their appreciation of our coopera- 
tion in their work Mamie Quinter and Nora Arnold Lichty 
sent to us in 1908 a communion service consisting of two trays, 
two wine jugs and two cups. 

Mamie Quinter labored joyously in India for ten years. 
She passed to her reward on January 14, 1914. 

The following poem was written in her memory by 
James A. Sell : 

A Last Token 

When the call was made for workers 

On the India mission field, 
There the voice of duty pressed her, 

When it meant her life to yield 
She resolved to leave her kindred 

And her home and native land, 
Brave the wild and dashing ocean, 

Join the trustful working band. 

All her cherished plans relinquished, 

She began her life anew. 
As she sacrificed for Jesus, 

Closer to His life she grew 
Her true heart of love and kindness 

Moved in pity for the lost, 
And she walked the way of duty, 

Heedless of the price it cost. 

Here she drew the fallen round her, 

For she won them by her love, 
Pointing them to Christ the Savior, 

And the better home above. 
And her heart was never lonely, 

Yearning for her native land, 
For her work among the lowly 

Brought her to a happy land. 

In the midst of loyal service 

She has sweetly passed away ; 
She has carved a name enduring, 

Shining through the heavenly day ; 
Though our hearts are sad and lonely, 

For to us she was so dear, 
Up in heaven her lovely presence 

To her Lord is bringing cheer. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 251 

Though again our band is broken, 

Leaving hearts all crushed and sore, 
It is God who hath bereft us, 

And we'll love and trust him more, 
When our toilsome journey's ended, 

And we, too, our work lay down, 
Then, like her, from Christ the Blessed 

We'll receive a starry crown. 

After Sister Quinter's death, we were assigned the sup- 
port of Mrs. Raymond Flory in China. Thus during the next 
few years we were supporting one worker in China and one 
in India. After Mrs. Lichty's (Nora Arnold) death in 1918, 
Brother Oiler created an endowment fund for the support of 
a worker, no one being designated by a name and he discon- 
tinued giving for the full support of a worker to the 
Association. When Mrs. Flory retired from missionary serv- 
ice January 1, 1928, Mrs. Martha Horning was assigned for our 
support, she being then on furlough. After contributing 
toward her support one and one-half years it was found she 
could not return to the foreign field on account of her hus- 
band's health. Since then, July 1929, we have been support- 
ing Brother Minor M. Myers at Tai Yuan Fu, China. During 
these years the support advanced from: $250, (1904) ; $300, 
(1913); $350, (1915); $400, (1920); $500, (1922); $500, 
(1932) ; $550, (1938). 

Another project sponsored by the Missionary Association 
is the "Missionary Challenge to the Sunday School". At the 
Association meeting on March 3, 1925, "Brother J. J. Oiler 
proposed that we make a challenge to all the Sunday school 
classes who are not contributing definitely to missions, that is, 
if they will endeavor to raise funds for the support of missions, 
designating a certain field of missionary activity, the 
Missionary Association will double the amount raised by each 
class, thus the respective classes will be credited with double 
the amount of money which they raise. This challenge will 
not in any way conflict with the contributions toward support 
of Sister Flory in China." This challenge was made to the 
Sunday school classes and accepted. Thereafter for each 
dollar given to this fund Brother Oiler added $1.00. Since his 
death the challenge has been supported in full or in part, first 
by his wife and Miss Rello, and now by Miss Rello alone. 

On March 8, 1933, our Missionary Association had a 
special program in commemoration of the 40th anniversary 
of its organization. Four charter members were present. 
Mary Benedict, Nettie Benedict Deardorff, Lucy Benedict 
Shank and H. Milton Benedict. At this meeting a brief 
memorial service was held for the 43 departed members 
(among whom was W. B. Stover), special recognition being 



252 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

given to the eight deceased charter members : Lizzie Hollinger, 
Edith Newcomer, Susan Benedict, Carrie Bock, J. E. Rohrer, 
Jacob Kurtz, Lizzie Knepper, J. Frank Miller. Letters were 
read from Mrs. W. B. Stover and H. P. Garner, former 
members of the Association who have served on the mission 
field. We had hoped for a letter from Jesse B. Emmert, 
another former member of the Association, but for some 
unknown reason it did not reach us. Vocal music was ren- 
dered by a quartette composed of Brother and Mrs. H. M. 
Stover, Mrs. Allison Benedict, Brother C. R. Oellig, who had 
joined the Association 39 years previous. (Mrs. Benedict died 
seven months later.) A historical sketch was given by Sudie 
M. Wingert, who had been a member for 38 years. 

For several years the interest in the Missionary 
Association has been dwindling, due probably in part to many 
other church activities and to the fact that missionary informa- 
tion is given in other departments of our church work which 
help in supporting our foreign worker. We have dropped the 
roll of the Association because the support of a missionary on 
the foreign field is now considered a congregational project 
which is sponsored and kept alive by the Association. The 
following editorial note accompanied the article which 
appeared in the Gospel Messenger of April 15, 1933, entitled 
"Missionary Association of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania'' : 

"The story told here is a most interesting and informing 
one. It is interesting because of the facts it gives ; it is inform- 
ing because it covers enough time to give one the perspective 
of a movement. Thus one sees how the kindling of interest in 
missions through missionary education leads to notable gifts 
in life and means. Waynesboro has one of the most generous 
givers in the Church of the Brethren. His spirit has served to 
challenge the whole congregation. The record of Waynes- 
boro's giving toward the general work of the brotherhood for 
the last five years is as follows: 1929, $7,740.48; 1930, 
$15,887.61; 1931, $7,994.43; 1932, $7,292.03; 1933, 
$6,668.49." 

Young People's Meetings (Christian Worker's Meetings) 

It has been difficult to find the exact date when the young 
people's meetings were begun in our church. F. S. Boerner 
believed it to have been soon after our evangelistic meetings 
of February, 1888, (Brother H. C. Early, evangelist) at which 
time many young people united with the church. We know 
they were being held in 1892 as evidenced by a letter written 
by Elder J. F. Oiler to the Gospel Messenger and published 
on December 6, in which he refers to them as being "The life 
of the church" and says, "the old fathers are very much 
interested in these young people's meetings. They rejoice to 
see the young soldiers stand up and speak for Jesus a word 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 253 

of encouragement to each other. We do not know how we 
could do without such meetings of so much interest." 

In these early meetings the leader chose his own subject, 
led in the worship service, spoke or read something bearing 
on the subject, after which an opportunity was given to any 
one present to participate. When the hour was gone the 
meeting was closed with the singing of a hymn. These meet- 
ings were held in the church preceding the evening preaching 
service, the congregation assembling meanwhile. Mrs. C. R. 
Oellig informed me that Anna J. Boteler (one of the converts 
of February, 1888) led the first meeting. D. Elmer Miller 
and J. Frank Miller (brothers) became actively interested as 
soon as they united with the church. 

There was no formal organization until 1905. For many 
years the Missionary Association was its sponsor. Beginning 
with the year 1893 committees appointed annually by the 
Association selected topics and leaders for the meetings and 
prepared the topic cards. They spent many hours doing the 
work. In February, 1894, the president of the Association 
appointed a member "to ask the ministering brethren if it 
would be permissible to take up a collection in the young 
people's meeting to defray the expenses of the topic cards". 

At the Missionary Association meeting on April 3, 1905, 
a committee was appointed to devise plans for the improve- 
ment of the Christian Workers' meetings. 

At a special meeting of the Association held on April 16, 
1905, this committee recommended organization and the hold- 
ing of the meetings in the Sunday school room. A committee 
was appointed to bring the propositions to the church council 
for consideration. 

On April 22, 1905, a paper signed by about 40 members 
was presented to the church council asking for the privilege 
of organizing and permission to hold the meetings in the 
Sunday school room. It was decided that the meetings should 
be held in the Sunday school room for six months on trial and 
that the church should elect officers for six months. The 
following officers were elected: President, J. Frank Miller; 
secretary, Florence M. Hess; treasurer, D. R. Foglesonger. 
Elder J. B. Ruthrauff instructed the president to complete the 
organization as soon as possible. The first meeting in the 
Sunday school room was held on May 7, when a constitution 
was adopted to become effective on the first Sunday in July. 
F. S. Boerner was appointed chorister. 

At the church business meeting of November 11, 1905, 
J. Frank Miller reported that the meetings are well attended 
and the interest good ; that once a month a consecration serv- 
ice is held when all the enrolled members are expected to 
respond to roll call in some active way; that a collection is 
taken at the consecration service to meet current and inci- 



254 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 





Elder John B. Ruthrauff 



dental expenses. It was de- 
cided to continue the meet- 
ings in the Sunday school 
room. 

At the church business 
meeting on October 31, 1907, 
it was decided upon motion 
of J. J. Oiler to hold the 
Christian Worker's meetings 
in the church auditorium 
from October until April. 

This organization con- 
tinued to function for 27 
years. After the organiza- 
tion of the Junior Christian 
Workers' group this older 
group was known as the 
Adult Christian Workers. 
In the fall of 1932 it was de- 
cided to discontinue the 
meetings of the adult group 
because the younger genera- 
tion of adults were not 
greatly interested and they 

were becoming burdensome to the older generation, some 
persons of whom had been active in these meetings for 37 

years. . 

The first Junior Christian Workers group was organized 
by Elder J. M. Moore in the winter of 1923 (he having been 
granted permission to do so by the church council January 11, 
1923). Evelyn Benedict, Rello Oiler and John Stoner assumed 
the leadership of this group, which included children of 
various ages. In the fall of that year the younger children 
were taken from the group under the leadership of Elda Wertz 
and Mildred Hale. The new group was called the Junior 
Christian Workers and the older one the Young Peoples 
Department. The following year Mrs. Harper Good and 
Mildred Hale took charge of the junior group. With the 
exception of about one and one-half years Mrs. Good con- 
tinued in the leadership of this group until the fall of 1938. 
Mrs. Mary Snader was an associate superintendent for several 
years. Since 1938 Mrs. W. L. Widdowson and daughter, 
Thelma, have had charge of this group. 

In the winter of 1925 (after the building of the Sunday 
school addition to the church) the younger children were 
again taken from the older group and the intermediate group 
of the Christian Workers was organized with Misses Ella 
Sheeley and Rello Oiler as leaders. In the fall of that year 
Mr. W. C. Wertz and wife (nee Ella Sheeley) assumed the 
superintendency of this group and retained it for 11 years, 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 255 

since which time the work has been carried on under the 
following leadership: Mr. and Mrs. David Snider; Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Kissinger; Mrs. W. C. Wertz and Miss Kathryn 
Shoemaker; Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Ziegler; Misses Kathryn Oiler, 
Marcia Fike, Marion Ecker and Willard Good. During the 
present years (1940-1941) Miss Marcia Fike and Kathryn 
Shoemaker have had charge of this group. 

Miss Evelyn Benedict and John Stoner were with the 
older group from 1932 to 1939. During the years 1932 to 
1939 Miss Anna Bushman was an associate director with Miss 
Evelyn Benedict. Since September, 1939, the Young People's 
group has been under the leadership of Mr. and Mrs. John T. 
Fike. All three groups are creditably functioning at the 
present (October, 1940). 

Until August, 1930, these directors were selected by the 
pastor in conference with a few other persons (Church 
minutes September 29, 1929, and August 21, 1930). At the 
pastor's suggestion it was decided to place all Christian 
Workers' groups, except the adult, under the supervision of 
the Board of Christian Education which at that time was com- 
posed of the pastor, the officers and teachers of the Sunday 
school. Since September, 1932, they have been under the 
supervision of the new Board of Christian Education as set up 
by the church at that time. 

Women's Organizations — Ladies' Aid Society 

On March 2, 1895, the Sisters' Missionary Circle was 
organized at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth Rinehart, (Mrs. 
Samuel). The following officers were elected: President, 
Sister Mary Benedict; vice president, Sister Belle Price; and 
treasurer, Sister May Oiler. 

During the first ten months 14 children were provided 
with clothing to attend Sunday school. No minutes were kept 
during that time. At the January meeting, 1896, Sudie M. 
Wingert was elected recording secretary. A little later in the 
year Zella Benedict was elected corresponding secretary. A 
constitution was adopted in 1897 when their motto became: 
"Cast thy bread upon the waters for thou shalt find it after 
many days." 

During 1896 sixteen visitors canvassed the town thor- 
oughly seeking for children who did not attend any Sunday 
school. During that canvass 30 children were found who were 
willing to come to Sunday school if proper clothing were pro- 
vided for them. The Sunday school, under the superin- 
tendency of S. E. Dubbel, financed the purchasing of clothing, 
which the sisters bought or made. Simon Wiener, a Jewish 
merchant, made some nice reductions in price when fitting 
the boys. 



256 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

For several years the society supported two famine 
orphans in India and one in Armenia. For a number of years 
it sent barrels of provisions and clothing at Thanksgiving to 
our mission workers at Brooklyn, New York, and Washington, 
District of Columbia. 

In the fall of the year 1899 a committee of eight persons 
was appointed to go out by twos and make a social visit in the 
homes of every member of our congregation living in our town. 
This visit was made semi-annually for a few years. 

In the early history of the society the women made many 
sun bonnets (300 in one year). Some of them were made to 
order for merchants of the town. Mr. Smith provided many 
bolts of material and paid 12^ cents for each bonnet made. 
Some of the cutting was done in the evening on the long table 
in F. S. Boerner's tailor shop. When the church of 1903 was 
built, a room was provided for the society which was heated 
with an "egg stove". On sewing day one of the sisters went 
early and kindled the fire. For some years this chore was 
done by Mrs. Susan Foutz and Mrs. Eliza Emmert, (mother 
of Jesse B.) who was superintendent of the sewing. Some of 
the workers went on Wednesday morning and remained for 
prayer meeting service in the evening. (Coffee was made on 
the stove.) It was an inspiration to see these older sisters, 
some of whom had been sewing all day, come walking into 
prayer meeting when the first hymn was being sung. When 
the Sunday school addition was built to the church in 1924 a 
larger room was provided for the Aid workers. 

The society's work at present is confined chiefly to the 
making of quilts, comforts, aprons and prayer coverings. It 
makes annual contributions to the Conference offering, 
Community Chest, Missionary Association, Boy Scout work 
and to the Women's Work of the Brotherhood. Previous to 
the local Women's Work organization in October, 1933, the 
Aid Society sponsored the solicitation of funds from the 
women and girls of our church for the Women's Work project. 
The greatest project undertaken by the Ladies' Aid Society 
(which has been its name since April, 1933) was the recarpet- 
ing of the church and Sunday school auditoriums in 1929 at 
a cost of $2,964.66, much of which money was solicited. In 
April of each year the society has the charge of receiving and 
packing the annual contributions of gifts from our congre- 
gation for the Children's Home at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Officers for the present year are : President, Mrs. H. A. 
Good; vice president, Mrs. L. K. Ziegler; secretary, Mrs. D. J. 
Shank; treasurer, Mrs. R. M. Hale. Those who have served as 
presidents since its organization are : Mary Benedict, Mrs. 
D. W. Hess, Lizzie Knepper, Mary Flory, Mrs. Joseph Emmert, 
Mrs. H. M. Stover, Mrs. Clara Morgal, Mrs. J. M. Moore, Mrs. 
H. B. Rmehart, Mrs. W. J. Snader, Mrs. H. A. Good. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 257 

Women's Work 

For the years ending February 28, 1931, 1932, and 1933, 
the Ladies' Aid Society sponsored the solicitation for contribu- 
tions to our National Women's Work program. These con- 
tributions, together with what the Aid Society itself gave, 
were forwarded to the Mission Board. 

On May 16, 1933, under the directorship of Mrs. Grace 
Ziegler, a mother and daughter luncheon was held. In 
October, 1933, a women's council composed of one representa- 
tive from the Ladies' Aid Society, one from the Missionary 
Association, and one from each Sunday school class above the 
Intermediate Department wherein were women or girls, met 
at the parsonage and effected an organization for the advance- 
ment of the larger Women's Work program in our church, by 
electing Mrs. Grace Ziegler, Director; Mrs. S. S. Conner, 
Secretary; and Mrs. R. M. Hale, Treasurer. On November 23, 
1933, a Women's Work meeting was held in the church to 
which the women and girls brought their contributions 
($71.21) for the National Women's Work project. The 
officers which had been elected were approved and an 
interesting missionary program was rendered. 

Since then the organization has had at least three meet- 
ings annually; a mission study meeting; a mother and 
daughter luncheon; and the annual fall meeting when the 
officers are elected, the contributions are brought for the 
National Women's Work project, and inspiration is received 
to continue our efforts. We sometimes have a fourth meeting 
when some problem of Christian home life is considered. 

Three years ago directors were appointed for the five 
phases of Women's Work. These directors with the elective 
officers and pastor's wife constitute the executive body of our 
organization as now set up. The elective officers for the 
present year are: President, Mrs. Walter Snowberger; vice 
president, Mrs. H. L. Berkey; secretary-treasurer, Mrs. Stoler 

B. Good. 

In 1940 we assumed war relief as one of our projects and 
Mrs. Levi K. Ziegler was appointed chairman of the War 
Relief Committee. The women have responded nobly to the 
appeal for both new and second-hand clothing and meet in 
groups to make new clothing, all of which is sent to the 
Friends Service Commission at Philadelphia. Through relief 
cups which they have distributed some generous offerings 
have been received and sent to the Brethren Service Committee 
at Elgin, Illinois. 

Dates of and Speakers at the Meetings of Our Women's 

Work Organization 

Problems in Home Life: December, 1933, Dr. Mary 
Laughlin; January, 1934, Rufus Bowman; January, 1935, 



258 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

M. J. Brougher; January, 1936, Ernest J. Coffman; 1937, 
panel discussion by local women; March 2, 1938, pageant and 
talk by Mrs. Dan West. Mother and Daughter Luncheons: 
May, 1933, talk on Women's Work by Mrs. Grace Ziegler and 
also a pageant; May, 1934, Mrs. A. B. Miller, Hagerstown, 
Maryland; May, 1935, Mrs. Elizabeth R. Blough; May, 1936, 
Mrs. Isaac Long; May, 1937, Mrs. Minnie Bright; May, 1938, 
Sara Shissler; May, 1939, Mrs. Quincy Holsopple; May, 1940, 
Mrs. George Detweiler; May, 1941, Mrs. Martha Parker. 
Mission Study : 1934, morning and afternoon, "Eastern Women 
Today and Tomorrow", covered dish luncheon ; 1935, morning 
and afternoon, lawn box luncheon, "Women Under the 
Southern Cross" ; 1936, morning and afternoon, covered dish 
luncheon, "Orientals in American Life" ; 1937, evening, 7 :30, 
"Congo Cross"; 1938, evening, 7:30, "Mecca and Beyond" 
(review given by Mrs. Harry Berkey) ; 1939, morning and 
afternoon, "Moving Millions", a pageant of modern India; 
1940, morning and afternoon, "Women and the Way" ; 1941, 
morning and afternoon, "Stand by for China". Autumn meet- 
ings: 1933, missionary program prepared by Anetta Mow; 
1934, four messages from girls' schools of India, Africa, and 
China ; 1935, "Women and the Church", Mrs. B. C. Ritz ; 1936, 
"Women and the Church", Mrs. J. Walter Thomas; 1937, 
"Freedom in Christian Living", Mrs. L. K. Ziegler; 1938, 
inspirational talk, Mrs. Elmer Rowland; 1939, "Goals in 
Women's Work", Mrs. Florence Gibbel ; 1940, presentation by 
the directors of the five phases of our work. 

Boy Scout Work 

With G. Nelson Gingrich as scoutmaster and Robert Fitz 
as assistant the Boy Scout Troop #1 of Waynesboro, Pennsyl- 
vania, was organized in the fall of 1928. The charter was 
granted the troop October 26, 1928. The committeemen for 
the first year were : M. E. Sollenberger, J. B. Stoner, and H. L. 
Berkey. This charter, which expired June 30, 1929, was 
renewed twice. The committee for the third year was: J. B. 
Stoner, chairman; Raymond Hale, Sr., W. L. Widdowson, M. E. 
Sollenberger, F. O. Rebok, D. R. Fisher. (This work was 
sponsored by the pastor in conference with a few other 
persons.) 

After an interval of a few years another troop was organ- 
ized in 1935 under the sponsorship of the Board of Christian 
Education. Kenneth Monn was appointed scoutmaster and 
Donald Snider assistant. The committeemen in January, 1935, 
were John Kissinger, chairman ; G. N. Gingrich, Robert J. Fitz, 
E. E. Snader, E. S. Lehman. 

In December, 1940, Kenneth Monn resigned as scout- 
master. Willard Good is now scoutmaster, with Milton Toms 
as assistant. The committeemen for 1941 are LeRoy Maxwell, 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 259 

chairman; William Kissinger, A. R. Deardorff, K. A. Good, 
Kenneth Monn. 

In 1928 a room was equipped for the boys in the base- 
ment of the church to which an outside entrance was made. 
The troop uses the east church lawn for some of its recreations. 

As stated in their charter, the objectives of the Boy Scout 
troop are character building, Americanization and citizenship 
training. Emphasis is laid upon duty to self, duty to God and 
country, and duty to others. 

Scouting objectives are sought to be obtained by encour- 
aging the Scouts to live their motto — "Be Prepared" — and 
follow their slogan — "Do a Good Turn Daily" ; a planned and 
nationally uniform course of instruction, by which a Scout may 
advance from the lowest rank of Tenderfoot to the highest 
rank of Eagle Scout, covers such fields as first aid, animal life, 
camping, all types of crafts, botany, forestry, health and many 
other fields both enticing and instructive to boys of the teen 
age. 



WELTY CONGREGATION 

Welty's church house was built in 1836 by John Welty 
then living on the farm now owned by Samuel Nicodemus. 

John Welty bought from a Mr. Farst the east end of the 
plot and from Christian Newcomer the west end and the 
cemetery, a wedge-shaped plot. 

On the southwest corner of the ground so acquired Mr. 
Welty built a stone church, planning the south end to be used 
for school purposes. Folding doors separated it from the main 
room. This school was to be a subscription school and Mr. 
Welty solicited subscriptions from people of the community 
to help pay for the part of the building to be used as a school 
room. Mr. Welty was not at this time affiliated with any 
church, but was interested in community betterment. At first 
it was a union church. Services were held by the German 
Baptists and the Winebienerians. The Brethren in Christ, in 
1839, held a Love Feast there. 

John Welty had some time before this belonged to the 
Mennonite church. He was nominated by the Whig Party for 
the legislature and was elected. The Mennonite people said, 
"Do not go", but he went and was by them dis-fellowshipped. 
It was about this time that he built the church. 

The church as built had a long rostrum four by fifteen 
feet with two steps and about eighteen inches high. At the 
end of the rostrum he had a chair placed for himself which 
he occupied during the church services. Mrs. Welty sat on 
a bench nearby. 

After a year or two of school in the church house it did 
not seem to be satisfactory. So with the consent of the sub- 



260 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Welty Church 



scribers, Mr. Welty gave the ground and the subscription 
money was used to erect a brick school house just north of the 
church. Mr. Christian Newcomer contributed the rough 
timber and the rest of the material was purchased. About 
two years after the building of the church and before the 
building of the school house, Mr. Welty and his wife were 
baptized into the German Baptist Brethren Church at Price 
meeting house. The Welty church was located within the 
territory of the Antietam Congregation. 

After Mr. Welty became a member of the German Baptist 
Brethren he deeded the church property to them. Thus it 
became a part of the Antietam Congregation. Sometime later 
Mrs. Nancy Huggins deeded the house located-on the church 
property to the church. Mr. Welty died in 1844. 4 6881 

Love Feasts were at first held at irregular intervals, but 
later it became the custom to have the spring Love Feast at 
Prices and the fall Love Feast at Weltys. 

Tallow candles were used for lighting the church as late 
as 1883. 

There follows a period of years about which little seems 
to be known. Records are few and difficult to locate. 

In the year 1898 the stone church began to give way in 
the north corner and was torn down and replaced by the 
present larger brick structure. Two years later the church 
was incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



261 



Until 1934 Welty church remained a part of the Antietam 
Congregation. Feeling steadily grew among the brethren for 
organizing the local church as a separate congregation. At 
a special council meeting held in the Welty church on June 9 r 
1934, the congregation voted to divide and the Welty 
Congregation was organized. At the time of the new organ- 
ization the membership was 170. Elders present were L, K. 
Zeigler and C. R. Oellig. 

Through all these years the lives of many have con- 
tributed to the work. Because of few records we do not know 
the names of many of the leaders, nor of those of the laity. 

We are confident that the following lists are incomplete 
but no names are intentionally omitted. Some of the elders 
ordained at Weltys are: D. M. Baker, Jacob Snider, J. 1. 
Thomas. Other elders labored here in the years gone by. 
Prominent among these earliev ones was Elder Jos. Rohrer. 
He was a man of wide influence and highly respected in his 
church and community. Others who served as presiding elder 
were J. F. Oiler, John B. Ruthrauff, C. R. Oellig, H. M. Stover, 
and M. C. Valentine. 

Ministers elected at Weltys were : Joseph Rohrer, Joseph 
Carver, D. F. Good, H. M. Stover, Aaron Newcomer, H. C. 
Muck, Laban W. Leiter. 

Some of the deacons elected here were : Christian New- 
comer, Isaiah Hollenberger, Jno. Hoffman, Aaron Newcomer, 
Wra. Marker, Dan HoiTman, Bruce Hoffman, C. H. Hoffman, C. 

E. Marker, J. Oram Leiter, 
Geo. Oiler, Frank Barkdoll. 
Other deacons who 
served here : James Heefner, 
Walter Rowe. 

Brother J. I. Thomas be- 
came pastor in 1926 and is 
serving at the present time. 
In 1934 he was chosen as 
presiding elder. In addition 
to this Brother Thomas 
served Greencastle as part- 
time pastor from September, 
1937, until April 1, 1941. 

There are 200 members 
of the church. 

Ringgold Union Church 

A union house of wor- 
ship was built in the village 
of Ringgold, Maryland, and 
was dedicated on April 14, 
Elder J. I. Thomas, Pastor 1898. 




262 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

Five different denominations shared equally the respon- 
sibility and cash layout for the building. Some labor was 
donated. John W. Hoffman represented the German Baptist 
Brethren; J. M. Newcomer, the Church of Christ; I. M. 
Hoffman, the Lutheran Church; Abraham H. Martin, the 
Mennonite Church; and John Bayer, the Old Order of German 
Baptists. Lewis Barkdoll donated the plot of ground and the 
stone for the foundation. 

All five of the above named denominations worshipped m 
the church at first, but down through the years, one by one, 
they have ceased to do so and relinquished their rights in the 
property. For some years past and at the present time (1940) 
only two denominations hold regular worship services here, 
the Church of Christ and the Church of the Brethren. It is 
within the Welty Congregation. 



THE YORK CONGREGATION— FIRST AND 

SECOND CHURCHES 

The Church of the Brethren in York began as a mission in 
the Codorus Congregation, situated in the southern part of 
York County and embracing all that territory in and about 
York, Loganville, Shrewsbury down by the Maryland line and 
across to the Susquehanna River embracing Upper Codorus 



o£>s£*£l>~t 
















Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



26-3 



and Lower Conewago congregational lines. This congrega- 
tion was organized in 1758 and soon after numbered in its 
membership about forty families. The first elder was Jacob 
Danner, a son of Michael Danner, a prominent man in the early 
history of the county and one of the five commissioners 
appointed to view and lay off York County in 1749. Jacob 
Danner was among the most intelligent of the first German 
emigrants west of the Susquehanna, and figured very con- 
spicuously in history. He was a poet of no mean reputation 
about the year 1750. 

The services in general in York County prior to the build- 
ing of the Codorus 
church house were 
held in private 
homes, barns and 
school houses. Prom- 
inent among the first 
members of the 
Codorus Congrega- 
tion in 1758 were 
Rudy Yunt, Peter 
Brillhart, John Brill- 
hart, Henry Neff, and 
wives. 

In 1872 the Co- 
dorus church was 
built near Loganville. 
Jacob Aldinger then 
lived at Brillhart, 
York County, Penn- 
sylvania, about 12 
miles from the 
church. Aldinger's 
mother-in-law, Sister 
Lydia Sprenkel, then 
lived with them and 
always went along with them to church. She thought it was 
so far to go and wished for a church nearer to where they 
lived. She told Jacob Aldinger to try to have a church house 
within two miles of their home. She gave him money to keep 
until he could find a suitable location to build, so, when in 1879 
he purchased a farm near York, Aldinger said, "Now is the 
time to build that church and asked the council of the Codorus 
Congregation to build a church house at York. Some of the 
members said they also needed a church house at New 
Freedom. 

In 1883 the Codorus Congregation decided to build the 
two churches, one near New Freedom, the other in York. 
Elder Jacob Shamberger was in charge of the congregation 
at this time. 




Elder Jacob Aldinger 



264 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

The building committee for the York church consisted of 
Elder Jacob Aldinger, Noah Ness and David Markey, all living 
in the vicinity of \ork. This committee was appointed to pur- 
chase a lot and erect a suitable building in or near York. This 
location they selected was near the borough line, the site on 
which this building now stands. The owner of the lot was Mr. 
Alexander Smyser, who agreed to sell the lot for $1,200.00 
and agreed further that he would contribute $400.00, leaving 
a balance of $800.00 to be paid in cash. 

The building committee proceeded at once with the build- 
ing which cost $2,625.00. it was ready for dedication in 
January, 1884. Elder David Long, of Maryland, father of 
Elder Joseph A. Long, preached the dedicatory sermon. 

The following item appeared in the York Daily, Monday, 

January 7, 1884: . n A ,. . \u • 

"Yesterday the Brethren held their first meeting in their 
new brick church on Belvidere Avenue. Notwithstanding the 
bitter cold weather a large number of persons from the 
surrounding country were in attendance. " 

At this time there were about eighteen members ot the 
church living within the limits of the York Congregation. 
There are no records to tell who these members were. 

The York church was built largely through efforts of 
Elder Jacob Aldinger who was leader of the movement to 
locate a mission in this locality. Not alone in the building o± 
the house but through him has the church enjoyed a con- 
venience for baptism occasions in years gone by, even to the 

present day. , _. . . , 

Eleven years later, in 1895, the members living in and 
about York petitioned the congregation for a division of its 
territory and membership, making York a separate 
congregation. The inconvenience of members to attend coun- 
cils and Love Feasts at Codorus was given as the reason for 
this request. The request was granted and in a council held 
in the York church on July 20, 1895, the new organization was 
affected with Elder Christian Ness retaining the oversight until 
the following month. Elders present in this council were as 
follows: S. R. Zug, Jacob Hollinger, Peter Brown, and 

f^Mi y*i ^ti an ^4 ess 

On August 24th, the church met again in council and 
elected Elder S. R. Zug, Lancaster County, to be their pre- 
siding elder. Other officials were : Ministers, Jacob Aldinger, 
Caleb Correll, and Joseph A. Long; deacons, Adam Ness, 
M A Brown, and Elias Hollinger; secretary, Abram b. 
Hershey; treasurer, Elias Hollinger; committee present at this 
council were Brethren Andrew Myers and T. F. Imler. 

This same year, 1895, a committee consisting of Brethren 
Elias Hollinger, M. A. Brown, and C. G. Trimmer, was 
appointed to make arrangements for a Love Feast, the : tirst 
to be held in the York church, and which was held on October 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



261 




as 

o 

fa 
o 



u 

05 

P 

U 

P4 



266 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

20th, 1895. The cooking for the Love Feast was done in the 
home of Sister Alice K. Trimmer. 

On January 9, 1896, the official Brethren agreed to have 
the church elect an assistant elder, who was to preside over 
matters not requiring the presiding elder's special attention. 
Brother Joseph A. Long, not yet an ordained elder, was chosen. 
Brethren Elias Hollinger and Joseph A. Long were the first to 
represent the York church as delegates at District Meeting. 

This new congregation soon felt the need of help in the 
ministry, and on April 9th, 1896, called Brother James P. 
Lehman to the ministry. 

On August 1st, 1896, the elder appointed Brethren N. C. 
Baughman, John Krape, Sr., and Tobias Kunkle as trustees 
of the church. 

The York church soon had a vision of the many lost souls 
in this vicinity and accordingly, when only a year old, on 
September 27, 1896, in a special council called after the 
regular preaching services, by Brother Long, they agreed to 
have Brother S. F. Sanger, of Bridgewater, Virginia, hold a 
series of meetings early in December, and Brother John 
Mohler, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, to hold another in the 
following month. There are no known records available to 
tell who or how many were received into the church as a 
result of these meetings. 

Following is a copy taken from the church minutes of 
council held July 8, 1897: "It was unanimously agreed that 
the church take up the mission work in the eastern part of our 
city, hold services at a suitable point, and trust the work into 
the hands of a committee to be constituted of the ministering 
Brethren living in the city, namely : Brethren Long, Correll, 
and Lehman, whose duty it shall be to secure a place of wor- 
ship, and to oversee all matters relating to this important 
work. And it shall be the duty of every member to attend 
these meetings, and work in this new field when and wherever 
an opportunity presents itself." 

The church trustees were asked on April 8th, 1896, to 
serve as a building committee to erect a kitchen to be used 
during Love Feast. October 14th of the same year, a new 
committee was appointed consisting of Brethren John Baker, 
N. C. Baughman and John K. Pfaltzgraff. The final outcome 
was that the church on January 12th, 1899, decided to build 
an entirely new church. 

In council on April 27th, 1899, Elders C. L. Pfoutz and 
Jacob Hollinger were present and ordained Brother Joseph A. 
Long to the eldership, and on July 13th of this same year, 
Brother Long was elected presiding elder to succeed Elder 
S. R. Zug, who had served the church faithfully for the past 

four years. . 

1899 — August 2nd. The church was called in council by 
Brother Long for the purpose of considering the East York 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



267 



mission work. The 
committee reported 
that they can rent the 
old chapel on East 
Market Street to hold 
services in, for $60.00 
a year. By motion it 
was agreed that the 
committee engage the 
house and open the 
work at once. It was 
also agreed to open 
Sunday school at the 
chapel. The Sunday 
school officers for the 
East York Church, 
who shall serve for the 
remainder of the year, 
were elected as fol- 
lows : Superintendent, 
Israel Bowser; secre- 
tary, Anson Good ; 
treasurer, Samuel Hos- 
tetter; librarian, 
Mamie Junkie and 
Clara Hellerman. 

1900 — March 1st. 
It was previously an- 
nounced that this meeting was especially called in order to 
more fully consider the matter of building a new church house 
on the same site of the oJd church house. It was also 
suggested that a tabernacle be built to hold meetings and 
Sunday school while the new church is being built. November 
11th — The new church was dedicated. Sermons by Elder 
H. C. Early. Actual cost of church, $4,600.00. 

1901 — August 1st. D. R. Heddings received as deacon 
by certificate. 

1902 — September 20th. E. S. Young held Bible school 
term eight weeks. April 8th — J. J. Bowser was elected church 
treasurer. Served until January 1, 1917. October 2nd — 
Milton G. Keeney was elected to the deacon office. 

1903 — March 28th. John D. Dotterer and wife were 
received as deacon and deaconess. April 30th — Ella Heddings 
installed as deaconess. 

1905 — November 5 — The church having agreed at a 
previous council to hold a Christian Workers meeting, it was 
agreed that the elder appoint an executive committee of five 
brethren and sisters, who shall organize as a committee. The 
executive committee appointed is as follows : Louise Sprenkle, 
Emory Trimmer, Jessie Dotterer, Calvin Lefever, Alice K. 




Elder Joseph A. Long 



268 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Trimmer. The elder appointed Brother G. G. Trimmer to lead 
the first meeting, Sunday evening, November 12th, 1905. 

1907 — October 11th — Quarterly council. It was agreed 
that Elders Pfoultz and Wiley shall take part in the work of 
this meeting, to hold an election for a minister. The election 
resulted in the choice of Brother Melvin A. Jacobs. Brother 
Jacobs with his wife, Emma, were installed in the usual 
manner. 

1907 — March 7th — Received by letter Brother Daniel 
Bowser and wife, Mamie, who moved here from East Berlin, 
as a minister in the first degree, was received to labor with us 
in this church. It was agreed to purchase the lot recom- 
mended by the committee, the corner of Spruce and Rouse 
Avenues, East York, and build a church house on the site. 
December 6th — The final report of the East York building 
committee was received. The building cost about $3,640.00. 
October 4th — Daniel Bowser and M. A. Jacobs were advanced 
to the second degree of the ministry. December 6th — East 
York church was dedicated. Sermon by Elder W. J. Swigart. 

1909 — July 8th — Brethren David Brillhart and Jacob 
Myers of East Codorus Congregation, being present by request 
of our elder, to take part in the meeting. Brother Brillhart 
read the qualifications required for a deacon, after which the 
vote of the church was taken, resulting in the election of 
Brethren George Leathery and Harry Flohr as deacons. 

1910 — July 7th — Council. It was agreed by the church 
to hold an election for a minister. The vote of the church 
was taken by Brother David Brillhart and Brother Jacob 
Myers. Brother L. Elmer Leas and wife, Anna, were elected. 
October 6th — Church organized Teachers Training. First 
teacher, H. H. Hollinger until February 15, 1911. Second, 
D. W. Baker, until his death which occurred September 25, 
1923. Bible school organized following Teachers Training. 
Average attendance 112. Teachers were L. Elmer Leas, 
Arthur Hess, and Joseph Baugher. 

1911 — October 12th — Daniel Bowser was ordained elder. 

1913 — January 9th — L. Elmer Leas was advanced to the 
second degree ministry. April 3rd — George K. Pfaltzgraff 
was elected secretary to succeed A. S. Hershey, who served 
as secretary since the beginning of the York church. 

1914 — By motion duly seconded, Brethren Jacob Myers 
and Charles L. Baker took part in the meeting to elect deacons 
on July 8th. The choice fell on Henry W. Crist and wife, 
Theodore Wagner and wife who were installed in the usual 
manner. Also John Moser and wife were received as deacon 
i\ x\ (l c\ (*f[ con ess 

1915 — April 6th — Elders Albert Hollinger, Oliver Cook, 
Jacob Brenneman and Alexander Brodbeck took charge of 
the meeting to hold an election for a minister, which resulted 
in the election of Brother Joseph J. Bowser. He and his wife, 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 269 

Ida, were installed in the usual manner. May 6th — Letters of 
membership were received. Brother Jacob Brenneman and 
wife being received as ministers in the second degree. 

1916 — December 8th — The trustees, G. K. Pfaltzgraff, 
John F. Sprenkel, Charles Graff, were instructed to purchase 
a plot of ground 40 by 109 feet adjoining the East York church, 
fronting 40 feet on East Princess Street at $8.00 a front foot. 

1917 — January 11th — James P. Lehman elected church 
treasurer. 

1918— April 11th— Council. Elders H. M. Stover and 
David Brillhart took the voice of the church for an election of 
a minister according to the late dictation of the Annual 
Meeting. Brother D. K. Trimmer was elected and installed. 

1919 — April 10th — Council. The following brethren 
took part in the meeting: Elder Oliver Cook and Elder Charles 
H. Baker. An election for two deacons was held. Brother 
Thomas Fitz and wife and Brother Eli Wagner and wife were 
installed in the usual manner. 

1920 — December 8th — George W. Kraft was elected 
treasurer. December 21st — Council. The following elders 
were present: Charles Baker, A. S. Baugher, and Grant Group. 
The church decided to hold an election for a minister. The 
voice of the church was taken. Brother Chauncey Trimmer 
and wife were elected and duly installed in the usual way. 

1921 — September 30th — A. D. Hoover and wife received 
as deacon and deaconess. November 4th — L. Elmer Leas was 
ordained elder. 

1922 — April 14th — New addition to church building. 
By motion duly carried the plan presented by the committee 
was adopted and the committee instructed to proceed with 
building the new addition. The building committee are as 
follows : George Pfaltzgraff, George Leathery, Charles Graff, 
Adam Ness, and Jacob Aldinger. 

1923 — October 8th — Joseph Baugher was received as a 
minister. J. C. Racer and wife were received as deacon and 
deaconess. Motion passed and carried that Elder Long select 
a speaker for these services and arrange everything for the 
dedication. December 6th — The new Sunday school building 
was dedicated. Sermon by James M. Moore. Cost of building 
$33,500.00. 

1924 — November 2nd — Wayne Keller, Sr., was elected 
treasurer. 

1925 — April 9th — E. J. Myers and wife were received by 
letter as deacon and deaconess. 

1926 — February 9th — Harrison S. Gipe was received as 
a minister. July 6th — Melvin A. Jacobs was received as an 
elder. October 28th — Melvin A. Jacobs was elected as 
presiding elder. Church membership 548. 

1927 — August 19th — Special council meeting. Elders 
Baker and Grant Group were present and took part in holding 



270 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

an election for two deacons. After the vote was taken, Elder 
Jacobs stated that three were nearly tie, and asked the church 
if they wanted to accept three. By a rising vote it was 
decided to take the three. Brother Arthur R. Hess and wife, 
Katie ; Brother Ralph B. Lehman and wife, Bertha ; Brother 
Calvin Lefever and wife, Katie, were duly installed. 

1929 — January 18th — Brother James Sweitzer and wife 
were received by certificate as deacon and deaconess. Harry 
C. Miller and wife were received as deacon and deaconess. 

1930 — January 17th — Regular council. Our elder called 
in Elders C. L. Baker and Michael Markey, for the purpose of 
holding an election for deacons; the call coming from the 
deacon board. The result of the election showed that five 
brethren had received a sufficient number of votes to be 
elected. A motion duly seconded was passed that five instead 
of four, be installed with their wives. They were John 
McWilliams and wife, Nettie; Granville Burgard and wife, 
Verne ; John Krape and wife, Eliza ; Wayne Keller and wife, 
Emma; and Sanford Trimmer and wife, Camilla. August 
7th — Council was favored with the ministerial board of the 
district, Elders W. G. Group, A. S. Baugher and B. F. Lightner. 
The vote was taken for two ministers and resulted as follows : 
Brethren Arthur R. Hess and wife, Katie ; Ralph B. Lehman 
and wife, Bertha. Since two of the deacons were called to the 
ministry, our elder called for an election for three deacons. 
The vote for three deacons was then taken and resulted in 
electing Brethren Spencer Seigman and wife, Nettie ; George 
Stough and wife, Purdon; Paul Lehman and wife, Grace. 
They were installed as deacons. December 15th — Joseph J. 
Bowser was ordained elder. Elder Baugher charged Brother 
and Sister Bowser in harmony with the church practice of the 
laying on of hands and prayer. 

1931 — October 9th — Enoch Maderia was elected church 

secretary. 

1932 — July 4th — Paul Hershey was elected treasurer. 
July 25th — Council. The courtesy was extended to Michael 
Markey and Samuel Myers to conduct the election of two 
deacons. Brother Moses Mummert and wife, Emma; and 
Brother Lowell Landis and wife, Ruby, were elected. 

1933 — April 21st — Brother Chester Royer and wife, 
Anna. Their certificates were read and he was accepted as a 
minister. July 14th — Francis Bair was elected church 

1934 — January 12th — Moses Mummert was elected 
church secretary for two years. The idea of a local church 
historian was brought before the meeting by Brother J. J. 
Bowser. Sister Anna Aldinger Sheets was elected to serve 

for two years. 

1935 — A report of a committee authorized by the District 
Meeting of October, 1934, recommended that the services of 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



271 



the present pastor, Brother M. A. Jacobs, terminate 
September 1st, 1935. 

1936 — Council meeting dated May 15th, 1936, voted to 
call Brother S. S, Blough to act as pastor of the York church 
which was accepted by him. 

1939 — Special council December 15th, 1939, elected 
Brother J. J. Bowser and Brother S. S. Blough elder and 
associate elder respectively. 

1940 — Brother S. S. Blough presented his resignation to 
council April 12th to become effective September 1st, 1940. 

Special council meeting of 
April 26th elected five new 
deacons as follows: James E. 
Oberdick and wife, Ruth; 
Wilmer Markle and wife, Ida ; 
W i 1 b e r t Bohn and wife, 
Alberta; Lehman Crist and 
wife, Alverta; and John Min- 
nich and wife, Dorothy. Coun- 
cil meeting of July 19th, 1940, 
elected Brother Edward K. 
Zeigler pastor of the York 
First and Second churches, 
starting September 1st, 1940. 
1941 — Council meeting of 
January 12th, 1941, voted to 
consider Brother J. W. Barwick 
as a full standing minister of 
the Church of the Brethren. 
In a specially called council 
meeting on Thursday, August 
7, the York church licensed to 
the ministry four young men 
who after much prayerful con- 
sideration felt called of God to 
the ministry, and had volun- 
teered to the church for this work. The service of licensing 
was in charge of Elders C. E. Grapes, chairman of the District 
Ministerial Board, and S. C. Godfrey. The four young men 
licensed were Jesse Owen Jenkins, Stanley Smith Dotterer, 
Ernest Warren Lefever, and J. Jack Melhorn. At this meet- 
ing, Elder Joseph J. Bowser was re-elected elder-in-charge of 
the York church for a term of three years. 




Elder Edward K. Ziegler, Pastor 



The Sunday School 

Quoted from an address given by Elder L. Elmer Leas on 
50th anniversary in 1934 : 

"Nathan Arnold was appointed by Christian Ness, of the 
Mother church, as the first superintendent in 1894. According 



272 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




J. J. Bowser, Presiding Elder 



to the records, Alec M. Brod- 
beck was the next superin- 
tendent with John F. Leh- 
man as assistant who be- 
came the superintendent the 
following year with Elias 
Hollinger as assistant till 
December, 1897." 

Since that time there 
were eight different brethren 
who served as superinten- 
dents: Ralph B. Lehman 
having served ten years; 
A. S. Hershey, nine years; 
James P. Lehman, five years ; 
L. Elmer Leas, five years; 
J. J. Bowser, four years; 
M. A. Jacobs, one year; 
Charles W. Graff, one year; 
Emory P. Trimmer, one year. 
M. A. Brown, Daniel Bowser, 
S. S. Aldinger, Arthur Hess 
and Calvin Lefever served 
as assistant superintendents. 

The date of the service will be found in the minute book of the 
York Sunday School. 

H. H. Hollinger, Wm. Hollinger, D. W. Hildebrand, Katie 
Roth Lefever, Claude B. Long, Enoch Maderia, John Krape, 
Eli S. Keeny, Paul Lehman, Orren Dotterer and Lehman Crist 
served as secretary, but not in any other office. Often the 
superintendents served in different offices. 

Howard Englar served as treasurer for a period of fifteen 
years, being in office during the longest period. 

Before the official and regular organization of the Sunday 
school in 1894 and 1895, there were two superintendents who 
took an active part in Sunday school work from 1891 to 1894, 
and even before that time, or, from the time the church house 
was built and dedicated in 1884. In 1891, John W. Royer 
became superintendent; Adam Ness, assistant; C. G. Trimmer, 
secretary; and A. S. Hershey, treasurer. The next year, 
October, 1892 to 1893, George M. Miller became superinten- 
dent, with C. G. Trimmer, as assistant, and A. S, Hershey, 
secretary and treasurer. 

About five years after this Sunday school was organized, 
an attempt was made to start one in the e?st end, in the home 
of Charles Lehman as well as in the old Lutheran church on 
East Market Street but was closed at the time of the rebuilding 
of this church house in 1900 and no continuous Sunday school 
was organized until May, 1906, which was then started in the 
East Poplar Street school house on Sherman Street until the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 273 

present church was built and dedicated in December, 1907. 
Elton Peterman was the first superintendent, followed by 
J. J. Bowser, John K. Pfaltzgraff, Harry Hoover, Chauncey 
Trimmer, and the present superintendent, George Stough. 

You will notice that York Sunday School was fully 
organized in 1894-1895 and was on its way for at least ten 
years while the question was agitating the Brotherhood and 
while Annual Conference was moving toward its fostering 
care and general approval. This spirit has characterized our 
Sunday school in mission classes, teacher training and Bible 
classes in the spiritual growth and development of its workers. 

Our former elder and pastor, Brother J. A. Long, has this 
to say in a history of "The York Sunday School — Its Struggles 
and Triumphs" : 

"If ever a birth was attended with anguish and travail, 
and cool reception to the new born, this proverb became a 
vertiable fact in the birth of the York Sunday School. The 
church rulings at that time in this locality were adverse to the 
movement, and greatly hindered its progress to the great 
disappointment of those who advocated it. 

"Undismayed in courage, few marched in solid phalanx 
against the wave of opposition, gradually gained a little foot- 
hold by pleading and prayer until the church relented and 
granted a compromise, authorizing a Bible class in which the 
hymn book and Bible might be used, but without helps. Close 
upon the heels of the action of the church, a tidal wave of the 
Sunday school spirit swept over the land sometime during the 
eighties, resulting in a great change of conditions and the 
organizing of a school on both the parent church and at York, 
Pennsylvania. " 

It was during this period that about a dozen organized 
a Bible class. A Bible class, taught by Elder Jacob Aldinger, 
of about twenty or twenty-five, met for Bible study at 5 P.M. 
on Sunday evening before preaching. 

It was noticeable that the children of our members would 
become interested in Bible study and worship away from our 
church and would be largely neglected if our own people did 
not take proper care of them in our own activities of the 
Sunday school, and so it was seen that we needed a Sunday 
school of our own. 

The children came along and were put under a separate 
teacher, Sister Anna Aldinger Sheets, and soon there was an 
equal number in that class from which the classes grew and 
multiplied, and so the work started in Bible study in the homes 
and the church with prayer, perseverance and sometimes even 
dissension in council until it grew, by the Grace of God, into 
one of our largest schools in the Brotherhood, having an 
enrollment of nearly one thousand. 

May our Bible school, as we choose to call it, be a mighty 
factor by the help of the Spirit of God and His work in bring- 



274 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

ing many to the foot of the cross, that they may learn to know 
the Truth, for the Truth shall make them free. 

The Missionary Efforts of the First Church Which Resulted 

in the Second Church 

In November, 1897, permission was granted by the 
Sunday school to start the East End Mission Sunday School in 
the home of Charles Lehman, 803 East King Street. James P. 
Lehman was the first superintendent. The records show that 
in April, 1898, the sum of $5.00 was paid to Charles Lehman 
for the use of his house and fuel. The school was closed July 1, 
1898, because the "gypsie" element in this locality left on 
their summer vacation. 

In April, 1899, the Good Will Engine House on East 
Market Street was secured at an annual rental of $60.00 for 
the use of a Sunday school. Brother Israel Bowser was the 
superintendent. Brother George Lehmer, of Dillsburg, con- 
ducted a successful revival just before the Christmas holidays 
in 1899. Because satisfactory arrangements could not be 
made for the rental of a building the school closed July 
12, 1900. 

On July 12, 1906, the public school house at the corner of 
East Poplar and South Sherman Streets was secured. With 
Brother Elton Peterman as superintendent. Brother Peterman 
left for Mississippi in November, 1906, and Brother J. J. 
Bowser filled his unexpired term. 

The work progressed because of the united and whole- 
hearted efforts of the congregation and it was decided to find 
a suitable place to build a permanent church proper for 
Sunday school and worship in the east end of the city. The 
following committee was appointed : Adam Ness, George K. 
Pfaltzgraff, and John F. Sprenkel, Sr., chairman. 

Credit belongs to Sister Julia A. Sprenkel, deceased and 
mother of Ella, Louise, and John F. Sprenkel, Sr., who heard 
of and saw the opportunity to purchase a lot (the present 
location). They bought it and turned it over to the church. 
These four members of the church deserve special recognition 
for this act and foresight. 

This was the clinching of a permanent location for the 
Second Church. According to records the purchase was made 
April 11, 1907, for eleven hundred dollars ($1100.00). 

These were happy days. A fine staff of earnest Christian 
workers, not to be dismayed or discouraged — with hearts and 
hands and voices labored faithfully. 

The work of teaching went forward and the church sent 
out solicitors to build a new church. This was accomplished 
and Elder John H. Keller, Secretary of the Southern District 
of Pennsylvania Mission Board, was notified, who secured the 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



275 



■ 




Old Second Church Building 
Dedicated December 6, 1907; Razed 1939 for New Church. 



services of Elder William J. Swigart of Juniata College, 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, to preach the dedicatory sermon. 

The old Second Church was dedicated December 6th, 
1907, at an actual cost of $3,640.00. On December 28th, 1915, 
the additional lot, fronting on East Princess Street was pur- 
chased for $320.00. It is on this lot that Sunday school 
department of church building is now built. 

At the beginning, the missionary efforts at the Second 
Church were carried on by members from the First Church. 
In order to do this, Sunday school was held in the afternoon 
and church services were irregular. The Sunday school grew 
in numbers and in 1922 was made independent of the First 
Church. The Sunday school was held in the morning, the 
morning and evening worship services were conducted by the 
preachers from the First Church. The Sunday school con- 
tinued to grow after the World War period and outgrew the 
old building. 

In 1925 there was an effort to build an extension to the 
building. Repeated efforts to expand were made in 1926, 
1927, and 1934. In 1934 preliminary plans were drawn and 
$3,000.00 was solicited. In 1935, however, plans were 
developing to start the Madison Avenue Church, and in 
January, 1936, many of the members withdrew to the newly 
started church. This halted the expansion movement until 
the committee of nine elders, advisory to the York churches, 



276 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



recommended dividing the York Church into two congrega- 
tions in the not too distant future. A committee investigating 
this report recommended a building fund be started immedi- 
ately so that the Second Church could be improved to accom- 
modate a separate congregation of 250 to 300 members. 

In May, 1938, solicitors were appointed ; this effort 
culminated in the building of the present sanctuary. The 
building committee was composed of John F. Sprenkel, chair- 
man; George E. Stough, Arthur R. Hess, Ralph B. Lehman, 




fca?2s&^B8£a&®^ 



New Second Church, Dedicated 1940 



S. S. Blough, Mrs. Enoch Modiera, Lehman W. Crist, and 
Sanford W. Trimmer. J. M. Blough, brother of the pastor, 
broke ground for the building; Elder H. Mitchell Stover, 
Waynesboro, delivered the address at the corner stone laying. 
The edifice was dedicated on January 19, 1941, by Elder J. A. 
Robinson, pastor of the Walnut Grove Church, Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania. 

The cost of the building was $34,440.00 and of the church 
furniture $3,020.00. The committee had collected $17,000.00 
in cash at that time. The building has a capacity of 700 per- 
sons on the main floor and is equipped for a departmentalized 
Sunday school and for the baptism and Love Feast sacraments. 
The building contains in its north wall the title stone from the 
former church building. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 



277 




u 

E 
CJ 

Q 

O 

u 

w 

CO 

O 
>h 

fa 

o 

O 
i— i 

as 
H 
Eh 



^78 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Ladies' Aid Society 

Soon after the York Church of the Brethren became a 
separate congregation in 1894, a "sewing circle" as it was then 
known was organized at the home of Mrs. Nelson Baughman. 
The home of "Aunt Kate" Baughman was the center of this 
activity until sickness prevented, when the meetings were held 
at the home of Mary Krape, Katie Hess, and Ella Heddings, 
who became president in 1910. 

In the Gospel Messenger of February 10, 1906, a report 
is given showing that during the previous year 23 meetings 
were held with an average attendance of five. They made 
clothes-pin bags, aprons, sewing aprons, sunbonnets and 
donated quilts, comforts, and clothing to the poor. The cash 
earnings and donations amounted to $13.58. This was given 
to charitable institutions in the community and one dollar was 
given to the Brooklyn mission. 

Meetings were held in various homes until the Sunday 
school building was erected in 1923 when a room was equipped 
for this work. The Ladies' Aid now meets every week in this 
room with an average attendance of 10 to 16 active members. 
The work is also supported by five to ten associate members. 

Some records were lost, but an approximate summary is 
here presented. 

Donations given to missions in China, Africa, Russia 
Brooklyn, General Mission Board and home missions, $610 
to charitable institutions such as homes and schools, $873.36 
to charity, $200.00 ; to the home church, $385. 

Cash contributions received from associate members and 
friends amounted to $209.34. 

One of the faithful and continuous supports in work and 
as treasurer until the time of her death in 1937, was Sister 
Mary Aldinger. Her son, Jacob Aldinger, donated the entire 
equipment of patterns, unfinished quilts, and supplies to the 
present organization. Much credit is due to such faithful 
leaders of sacred memory. 

The present organization is as follows: President, Ella 
Heddings; Vice President, Anna Moser; Treasurer, Anna 
Leas; Assistant Treasurer, Millie Meals; Secretary, Ella 
Smith; Assistant Secretary, Eliza Krape. 

Ladies' Aid of East York 

The ladies of East York Mission Church met at the home 
of Sister Badders for the purpose of starting a Ladies' Aid 
Society October 21, 1926. The officers elected were: Presi- 
dent, Louise Sprenkel; Vice President, Mrs. Badders; Secre- 
tary, Nettie McWilliams; Assistant Secretary, Alice Wertz ; 
and Treasurer, Emma Wagner. 

The society met each Wednesday and quilted quilts, made 
aprons, bonnets, pot holders, bibs, etc. The Aid had some of 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 279 

their work exhibited at Hershey Conference in June, 1927. 
Cash to date, $130.95. 

The Aid did not meet during 1928, but on February 13, 
1929, they met at church and reorganized with the following 
officers: President, Ima Woods; Vice President, Mrs. Lyons; 
Secretary, Nettie McWilliams; Assistant Secretary, Louise 
Sprenkel; and Treasurer, Emma Wagner. 

President Ima Woods died March 23, 1933, and Sister 
Louise Sprenkel again served as president. 

August 30, 1935, Sister Emma Wagner died and Nettie 
McWilliams served as treasurer. 

In August, 1936, Sister Ida Markle was elected president 
and in March, 1939, the following officers were elected and 
are still serving the same offices : President, Ida Markle ; Vice 
President, Savilla Biser; and Secretary-Treasurer, Purdon M. 
Stough. 

We have an average attendance of six members and meet 
each Wednesday afternoon. Our work consisted lately of 
raising funds for a new church building. Now we have 
pleasure of enjoying our newly built church home since 
January, 1940. Up to date our society has paid $750.00 
towards the new church, also help working among poor and 
destitute in our city. We raised several hundred dollars by 
making four "friendship" quilts. 

Cradle Roll of Second Church 

Cradle Roll was started in 1922. Have 112 children 
enrolled during those 20 years. Superintendent at this time is 
Mrs. George Stough. There are 20 enrolled at present. 

Women's Work Organization 

The Women's Work Organization of the First and Second 
Churches of York was organized for the first time December 29, 
1936. The officers elected as a result of the first meeting were 
as follows: President, Mary Blough; Vice President, Eliza 
Krape ; Secretary, Ruby Landis ; Treasurer, Emma Mummert. 

The goal of this organization at the time of its inception 
was primarily to interest the women in giving toward 
missionary projects, foremost among which is the national 
project of the Women's Work Organization; namely the 
support of the girls' schools of India, China, and Africa. 

The present organization, however, is enlarging this goal 
to include other worthy projects, as well as to promote higher 
ideals in the home and closer relationships between mothers 
and daughters. 

Origin of Men's Work Organization, York, Pennsylvania 

At our regular quarterly council April 12, 1940, the 
organization committee of our church recommended that we 



280 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

effect a Men's Work Organization, which recommendation 
was accepted. 

On May 16, 1940, the men met at the church, under the 
direction of the organization committee, to effect this 
organization. After quite a number of interesting discussions 
and comments in favor of an organization, the following 
officers were elected for a term of one year: President, Dr. 
E. J. Bowser; Vice President, John Minnich; Secretary, M. T. 
Mummert; and Treasurer, Stanley S. Dotterer. Committee 
chairmen : John F. Sprenkel, program committee ; Lehman W. 
Crist, membership committee ; Herman Pfaltzgraff , recreation 
committee; and Stanley S. Dotterer, music committee. 

Meetings were held August 25, September 15, December 
5, 1940, and March 20, 1941. 

Constitutions and by-laws have been adopted, and on 
October 20th the officers were installed. 

Our goal for this year is to promote a better fellowship 
among the men of our church. 

On April 3rd, 1941, we sponsored our first public meeting 
at our church, with Brother William S. Livengood, Jr., as the 
speaker. 

History of the York Young Peoples' Department — 

First Church of the Brethren 

On July 6, 1933, a group of about thirty young people 
met at the First Church to organize a B.Y.P.D. There were 
three adult advisors chosen, namely, John Barwick, Chester 
Royer, and Katie Lef ever. The cabinet elected was as follows : 
President, John Minnich; Vice President, Anne Ness; Secre- 
tary, Gertrude Leas; Assistant Secretary, Mary Lehman; 
Treasurer, Mildred Lehman; Chorister, Margaret Leas; and 
Assistant Chorister, Ruth Sheets. The committees appointed 
were : program, membership, social, and constitution. 

During this year Caleb Bucher spoke to the group to help 
set forth ideals and goals for young peoples' work. John 
Barwick gave an illustrated lecture on his visit to the Holy 
Land. Twenty-five dollars was pledged to the East End 
Remodeling Fund. Before the end of the year there were 
seventy-five members in the department. 

The new cabinet was elected in September, 1934. This 
group sponsored the Apollo Quartette from California. A 
desire was expressed to help equip the new emergency room 
in the church and during the next year a medicine cabinet was 
purchased. Contributions were made to the Children's Home 
and Missionary Society of our church. Dr. Calvert Ellis spoke 
at a Sunday conference to the young people of the eastern zone 
sponsored by the York B.Y.P.D. 

In 1935 the new cabinet had little chance for progress 
and growth because of the unsettled condition of the church, 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 281 

and in July, 1936, a special meeting was called to elect a new 
cabinet. The group entertained the Bethany Biblical 
Seminary Quartette after the illustrated musical program in 
July, 1936. Brother Brougher spoke at an impressive sunrise 
service. Donations were made to Spanish relief, buying of 
church mimeograph, and foreign missions. 

The group of 1937 appointed a service chairman. "Youth 
Serves" was introduced and the young people supported the 
Brotherhood program for two hours ^60 ). This year was the 
beginning of "The Brethren Youth Builder", a monthly paper. 
We partially supported Roy Pfaltzgraii, a medical missionary 
student, with $40.00 contributed to college expenses. 

During the next year a delegate was sent to the Fellow- 
ship of Reconciliation Conference with half the expenses paid. 
Clothing, toys and money were collected for Spanish relief. 
Among many other things there were almost 60 dresses. We 
tried to stimulate interest for a Y.P.D. at the Second Church, 
but there was not sufficient interest shown. This was the first 
year for the young people to budget their money. The esti- 
mated amount to be spent during the year was $124. The 
highest amount was set aside for service. Ernest Lefever was 
our first member to attend a work camp. We donated toward 
his expenses, also toward expenses of campers to attend 
Camp Conewago. 

In 1939-1940, Walter Morewetz, a Jewish refugee from 
Austria, spoke around a camp-fire and played his accordian. 
For the last two years some of our most impressive services 
were Galilean services. 

The results were still better during the year 1940-1941 
than any previous year. Migrants were studied at our Sunday 
evening meetings during the months of January and February. 
The estimated budget is $150 with special emphasis on service 
and helping Roy Pfaltzgraff. Projects of knitting, handcraft, 
repairing old toys, collecting children's clothing and school 
supplies are in progress. A play concerning the life of 
migrants was presented and colored movies were shown. 
A week-end conference on "Worship", with Marshal Wolfe 
and Perry Huffaker as guests, was planned in March. The 
cabinet this year is President, John Eichelberger ; Vice Presi- 
dent, Harry McLaughlin; Secretary, Emma Trimmer; Assist- 
ant Secretary, Kathryn McLaughlin; Treasurer, Dale Crist; 
Chorister, John Krape, Jr.; Assistant Chorister, Doreen Crist; 
Advisor, Jesse Jenkins ; and Editor of Paper, Stanley Dotterer. 
The committee chairmen are: Program, Esther Hess; Social, 
Mary Lehman ; and Service, Jack Melhorn. 

Systematic Bible Study 

On September 20, 1902, Elder E. S. Young, Professor of 
Sacred History and Theology, North Manchester, Indiana, con- 



282 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

ducted a systematic Bible school for eight weeks, covering five 
books, namely: "Life of Christ — Harmony of Four Gospels", 
"The New Testament History", "The Old Testament History", 
"The Bible Geography", and "The Bible Outline". 

Elder Young was the author of the above books. A large 
class of about sixty teachers and ministers took this course of 
study. 

Following this in January, 1915, teacher training was 
started with Brother D. Webster Baker as the teacher. A class 
of 100 enrolled but only about 36 finished this course. 

Following this course an "Outline Studies of the Bible" 
(New Testament by William C. Schaeffer, D.E.) was started 
January, 1913, and completed October 2, 1913. 

In May, 1914, "Outline Studies of the Bible" (Old Testa- 
ment by Conrad A. Hauser) was also used. This was the 
advanced Heidelberg teacher training course. 

By this time the Brethren came out with our own first 
standard course, a book called "Training the Sunday School 
Teacher", published in 1913 by the General Sunday School 
Board of the Church of the Brethren, which was approved by 
the Committee on Education and International Sunday School 
Association, by I. B. Trout, E. B. Hoff, H. K. Ober and 
J. S. Flory. 

After the death of D. Webster Baker in 1914 Elder 
L. Elmer Leas took his place as teacher. Others who assisted 
later on were Ralph B. Lehman, Arthur Hess and Joseph M. 
Baugher. 

Bible Institutes 

A Bible Institute was conducted in the York First Church 
of the Brethren for two weeks from May 12th to May 26th, 
1912, by T. T. Myers, D.D., Juniata College, Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. Elder William Howe, of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, conducted a seven day Bible study in a Gospel tent 
during the conference. 

A number of other Bible Institutes were held in the York 
church by the following : Elder J. Kurtz Miller, winter of 1916, 
30 days; Elder Walter S. Long, April, 1917, two weeks; Elder 

A. C. Wieand, September, 1919, two weeks; Professors H. H. 
Nye and J. I. Baugher, February 3 and 4, 1923, two days ; and 
Dr. Ralph B. Schlosser and Dr. A. C. Baugher, a number of 
times week-ends from 1923 to present time. 

Daily Vacation Bible School 

First one decided on December 11, 1924, and was held 
June, 1925. Annually since. Committee : J. J. Bowser, Ralph 

B. Lehman, and C. W. Graff. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 283 

Organized Christian Workers Meeting 

Time: November, 1905 — Sunday Evening, 6:15 to 7:00 P.M. 

THE PRESENT RELIGIOUS EDUCATIONAL 

PROCEDURE 

During the early months of 1941, the York church has 
engaged in a series of Sunday evening discussions and study 
groups under the auspices of the Board of Christian Education. 
The first six weeks there was held at First Church a school of 
missions. Four classes were planned, and the total attendance 
for the six weeks averaged approximately fifty. Adults and 
children studied China, while the young people studied the 
migrants. A work program grew out of the young people's 
study, and much relief work and other activities are being 
carried on by them through the inspiration derived from their 
study. The first teachers were Professor James Widdowson, 
Miss Elizabeth Englar, and Jesse O. Jenkins. 

At the same time, a study of the Christian home was 
being conducted at Second Church. The instructors were 
George Stough, Edward K. Ziegler, and Mrs. George Stough. 
About thirty attended regularly. 

Following these courses, the groups at First Church 
began a study of the Christian home. Five classes were 
planned. A total attendance averaging about one hundred to 
one hundred and twenty was registered for these studies. 
The studies will continue through the winter and spring 
months only, each year, with different units of study. It has 
been found that this plan is very effective in teaching certain 
aspects of Christian living not adequately covered in Sunday 
school teaching. It will become a permanent part of the 
religious educational program of First and Second Churches. 

The Brethren Missionary Society of York 

A class of young girls in York organized themselves in 
August 22, 1913, and called themselves the "Faithful 
Missionaries , \ The first officers of the class, out of which later 
grew the missionary society, were as follows : President, Iva 
Long; Vice President, Helen Lehman; Secretary, Lillian 
Foreman ; Treasurer, Marion Dotterer. The class meetings 
were devoted to missionary matters, and were held twice a 
month. Attendance grew steadily, and after a time the class 
began all sorts of missionary activity for the poor, the sick, 
the shut-ins, and the unfortunate in various institutions. 
Thanksgiving and Christmas, 1915, the class gave baskets of 
provisions and fruits to the poor, invalids and sick folks of the 
congregation. 

By September, young men also were taking a prominent 
place in the class, and the new president was Henry W. Crist. 



284 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

In December, 1929, the missionary society was organized 
as an outgrowth of the Faithful Missionaries Class and their 
program of activities. The missionary society holds monthly 
meetings, plans one all-day service each year, and is interested 
particularly in local benevolent work and arranging of prayer 
services and meetings in institutions, and in the homes of 
invalids. The present president is Sister Eliza A. Krape. The 
society is engaged in useful ministry. 

Annual Conference in York in 1912 

The committee of arrangements appointed by the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania to locate a suitable place to 
hold the 1912 Annual Conference were the following: Elder 
Joseph A. Long, chairman; Elder Charles L. Baker, Elder 
Edward S. Miller, Elder J. M. Mohler, and Elder C. G. 
Trimmer. 

The Bureau of Information and Traffic Committee was 
Joseph J. Bowser, chairman, with Melvin A. Jacobs, H. Mit- 
chell Stover, and Vernon K. Stover. C. G. Trimmer was the 
chairman of the Lodging Committee. The chief cook at the 
restaurant on the ground was Isaac Replogle, of Bedford 
County, Pennsylvania. 




Ministers of York First Church at Time of Corner Stone Laying 

of Second Church June 4, 1939 

First row, left to right: Ralph B. Lehman, Pastor S. S. Blough, Daniel 

Bowser, Presiding Elder J. J. Bowser, Elder L. Elmer Leas ; second 

row: Joseph M. Baugher, Arthur Hess, Chester H. Royer. 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 285 

The conference opened Wednesday, May 29, 1912, and 
lasted seven days up to June 4, 1912. Sunday, June 2nd, 
there were 40,000 people in attendance. All Protestant 
churches invited our ministers to fill their pulpits and a great 
fellowship was enjoyed by all. 

The conference organization for 1912 was as follows: 
Elder H. C. Early, Washington, District of Columbia, 
Moderator; I. B. Trout, Lanark, Illinois, Reading Clerk; 
J. W. Lear, Decatur, Illinois, Writing Clerk, and Carl Rarick, 
Muncie, Indiana, Door-keeper. 

List of Officers, York Church, April, 1941 

Presiding elder, Joseph J. Bowser, 518 Madison Avenue, 
York, Pennsylvania; pastor, Edward K. Ziegler, 830 West 
Locust Street, York, Pennsylvania ; elder, L. Elmer Leas, 746 
West Philadelphia Street, York, Pennsylvania; ministers: 
Chester H. Royer, Manchester; Joseph M. Baugher, 25 North 
Sumner Street, York ; Arthur R. Hess, 834 West Poplar Street, 
York ; Ralph B. Lehman, 42 North West Street, York ; John W. 
Barwick, 14 West King Street, York; deacons: David H. 
Heddings, John Krape, James Sweitzer, Sanford Trimmer, 
George Stough, Moses T. Mummert, Granville Burgard, Calvin 
Lefever, John H. Moser, Lowell A. Landis, Wilmer Markle, 
Lehman Crist, James Oberdick, John B. Minnich, Wilbert 
Bohn, Harry C. Miller; church secretary, Roy H. Nicholas; 
church treasurer, Paul P. Hershey ; superintendent of Sunday 
schools: First Church, Sanford Trimmer; Second Church, 
George Stough. 

Number of members is 721. 



THE MADISON AVENUE CONGREGATION, YORK 

The Madison Avenue Congregation was organized 
January 21, 1936. The original membership was composed 
almost entirely of members from the First Church in York, 
who became dissatisfied with conditions existing in the First 
Church. 

The organization was affected by two elders of the dis- 
trict, after a district committee called to affect an organiza- 
tion, deferred action. The elders present to organize the new 
congregation were Brethren Samuel B. Myers and D. Edward 
Keeney, both of the Codorus Congregation. 

Elder M. A. Jacobs, retiring pastor and previously pre- 
siding elder of the First Church, was elected presiding elder 
and pastor. Brother Harvey E. Shue was elected secretary, 
and Brother M. Richard Jacobs, treasurer. Brethren John K. 
Pfaltzgraff, James R. Smith, and James Edward Hull were 



286 History — Church of the brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 




Elder M. A. Jacobs, Pastor 



chosen trustees. Brother Emory 
P. Trimmer was elected Sun- 
day school superintendent. 

When the church was 
organized, there was no treas- 
ury, and no equipment. There 
was no effort made to obtain 
any money from the First 
Church. 



Arrangements were made 
to purchase property on Madi- 
son Avenue, a purely residen- 
tial and restricted street. The 
property purchased has a 
frontage of 210 feet, nine 
inches, and a depth of 189 feet. 
The property had on it a frame 
building, formerly used as a 
club house, and valued at from 
$4,000.00 to $5,000.00. The 
building has an auditorium 
capable of accommodating an 
audience of 400. There is also 
a kitchen, a men's room and a ladies' room, all on the first 
floor ; in the rear, and part of the building, are two rooms on 
the first floor and two rooms on the second floor, now occupied 
by the sexton and his family. In the front part of the building, 
on the second floor, is a large room used by the Ladies' Aid 
Society. This property was purchased for $10,000.00, all of 
which was borrowed from one of our city banks at 4% interest. 

The equipment for the building was largely furnished by 
donations from our own members and friends. The pulpit 
was donated by a local cemetery association. Much of the 
material for tablecloths, aprons, and towels was donated by 
the proprietor of one of our large department stores. Chairs, 
pulpit furniture, pulpit Bible, song books, offering plates, 
clock, individual communion set, curtains, floor runners, a 
beautiful hand-painted pulpit picture, and an outside bulletin 
board, and many hours of service were among the donations. 

In three and one-half years the church was fully 
equipped, bills paid, and $1,800.00 paid on the purchase price 
of the property. 

Beginning with approximately 175 members, the church 
in three years had grown to 355. Of this number, 72 were 
received by baptism ; a number of them coming from families 
not reached before by the Brethren. 

The following organizations began to function immedi- 
ately after the church was organized : Sunday school, Ladies' 
Aid, Men's Work, and the B.Y.P.D. 




o 
>* 

X 
K 

B 
U 

H 
< 

o 

CO 



&m 



288 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



.*-*-:•:■:•:•:• 




Ministers of Madison Avenue 

Left to right, Robert S. Kraut, Presiding Elder M. A. Jacobs, 

Chauncey Trimmer. 



Two deacons, Brethren Michael A. Brown and Eli 
Wagner, now both deceased, composed the deacon board. 
Since then Brethren E. J. Meyers and A. D. Hoover became 
members and deacons of the congregation. Brethren 
Chauncey Trimmer and Robert Kraut, both ministers, soon 
became members of the congregation also. 

The official board of the church is composed of three 
ministers, two deacons, secretary, treasurer, and a representa- 
tive from each of the following organizations: Trustees, 
Finance Committee, Sunday School, Men's Work, Ladies' Aid, 
and the B.Y.P.D. 

After the property was purchased, work was immediately 
started to prepare the house for worship. In about two weeks 
all was in readiness. A service of dedication was held 
February 9, 1936. Brother Marshall Wolfe preached the 
dedicatory sermon. 

Besides the Sunday school, preaching services are held 
morning and evening of each Sunday. Two Love Feasts are 
held each year. At the first Love Feast, 196 communed. The 
largest number of communicants at any of our Love Feasts to 
date was 281. 

Much interest was manifested by others outside the 
congregation so that in the first three years, 24 of our own 



Congregations of Southern Pennsylvania 289 



ministers and 17 ministers of other denominations either 
preached for us, or assisted in the services. 

The congregation was recognized by the church upon 
recommendation of a committee from standing committee. 
This committee, composed of Brethren James M. Moore, 
Edward Kintner, and M. Clyde Horst, came to our church, 
December, 1938, and recommended full recognition. This 
action of the committee was approved by the 1938 standing 
committee, and by the District Meeting of Southern 
Pennsylvania on October 25, 1939. 

The present number of members is 387. 



CHAPTER III 

OUR DISTRICT 

THE STORY OF THE HISTORY AS RELATED 

TO DISTRICT MEETING 

Queries Concerning History of Southern District of 

Pennsylvania 

D. M. Minute 1917. P. 8. Special Business — 

The matter of joining with the Middle District of 
Pennsylvania in the compiling of a history of the Church of the 
Brethren in these two districts was presented. A motion was 
made to defer the matter for one year with the recommenda- 
tion that it be brought before each congregation during the 
year. Passed. 

Minute 1918. Query 19 — 

In view of the fact that at our last District Meeting it was 
decided to bring the matter of compiling a "History of the 
Brethren" with the Middle District of Pennsylvania before the 
different congregations of our district, we, the Hanover 
Church, request this District Meeting of 1918 to appoint a 
committee of three brethren to cooperate with a like com- 
mittee from Middle District to compile data for a history to be 
published after the war, if conditions permit and to present 
the progress of the work at the next District Meeting. Decided 
to return the paper. Rereading of old minutes called for. It 
was decided to reaffirm the decisions of last year's minutes 
under Special Matters. P. 8. 

1933 (P. 36.)— 

Request from York and Upper Codorus Congregations 
that District Meeting elect a Historical Committee (three 
members) to gather all available historical matter from each 
of the churches in the district. Passed. Committee elected 

E. S. Miller, Lineboro, Maryland ; Mrs. Annie Sheets, York ; 
Sudie M. Wingert, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

Report of the Secretary of the Historical Committee 

The Historical Committee, composed of E. S. Miller, Mrs. 
Edgar Sheets, and Sudie M. Wingert, which was elected at the 
District Meeting of 1933, organized with Sudie M. Wingert as 
secretary. 



Our District 291 

Sister Sheets assumed the responsibility of collecting the 
historical data of the congregations within the limits of the 
original Codorus Congregation, which are : Codorus, York and 
New Fairview. Brother Miller assumed the responsibility of 
collecting that of the congregations within the limits of the 
original Little Conewago Congregation, which are : Upper 
Codorus, Pleasant Hill and Hanover. I undertook the task of 
collecting the data from the other 21 congregations. 

Sister Sheets reports her work almost completed. 
Brother Miller and myself report progress. I began my work 
by asking the elders or pastors to appoint local historians in 
their respective congregations and to report to me of the 
appointments. The prompt response from most of them was 
gratifying. The eagerness of some historians to do their 
utmost was heartening. The apparent indifference of a few 
was a bit discouraging. Of the 21 congregations two have 
sent no report. Nineteen reports have been received by me. 
A few are very complete ; a few are very brief; several will be 
revised and completed. We trust that those who have not 
responded will do so ere long and that all will finish their work 
as soon as possible. 

The question has arisen as to whether we want 
pictures. We await your advise in regard to the solicitation 
for them. 

Do you desire us to get sketches of the work of the various 
district organizations ? If so, we will need to have access to 
the District Conference minutes for the years 1894, 1898, 
1899, and 1900. Will some one give or lend us copies of these 
minutes? Upon inquiry from the District Conference secre- 
tary I find that the minutes previous to 1910 are rather 
incomplete. As secretary of the district historical committee 
I should like to secure a complete file for the District Confer- 
ence secretary. Will those of you who have any of these 
minutes and are willing to give them communicate with me. 

Respectfully submitted, 1934, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary. 

Report of the Secretary of the Historical Committee 

In response to efforts during the year the Historical 
Committee has acquired some additional historical data. This 
has been obtained from the congregations' historians and from 
research work in county histories and old "Gospel 
Messengers". We have been informed that more data is 
forthcoming. 

We commend those congregations which have responded 
and we solicit a more expeditious cooperation on the part of 
some. We appreciate that in most congregations the sources 
of information are meager due to the lack of early written 
records. Should any additional historical facts be learned 



292 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

after sending your records to us we urge you to be not 
hesitant in forwarding them to us. 

Respectfully submitted, 1935, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary. 

Report of the Secretary of the Historical Committee 

On account of a physical handicap we were not able to 
accomplish as much during the year as we had desired. We 
have received some additional historical data. The records 
from some congregations are yet unsatisfactory because of 
their brevity. 

Inquiries have come to us concerning the cost of publish- 
ing pictures with these records. This committee which was 
appointed only to collect historical data cannot answer that 
question. May we suggest that District Meeting consider the 
advisability of commissioning some one to procure that 
information for us? 

Respectfully submitted, 1936, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary, 
112 East Third Street, 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

October 28, 1936. Report adopted, request granted. 
Sister Wingert was authorized to secure information. 
M. E. Sollenberger and G. W. Harlacher were added to 
committee. 

Report of the Secretary of the Historical Committee 

During the past year we have acquired a little more his- 
torical data. We now have something from each congrega- 
tion but desire a little additional data from some. May we 
suggest that this meeting appoint a committee or empower the 
present historical committee to make plans for the editing of 
this material, subject to the approval of the next District 
Meeting. 

The new members of our committee have made inquiry 
concerning the cost of publishing pictures. We find that the 
prices of cuts vary with the size of cut and quality of paper 
used. The approximate cost of a cut two by three and one- 
half inches being $1.50 and of one six by four inches $3.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 1937, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary, 
112 East Third Street, 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

The report was accepted, the request granted and com- 
mittee continued with A. S. Baugher elected to fill the vacancy 
of E. S. Miller, deceased. 



Our District 293 

Report of the Historical Committee 

To the 1938 District Meeting of Southern Pennsylvania : 

Since our last report we have made little progress. On 
September 2nd we sent an inquiry to each elder or pastor of 
the 29 congregations in our district asking how many copies 
of the History of the Churches of Southern Pennsylvania their 
individual congregations would desire to purchase, providing 
the book is published in the next few years. We also stated 
that we have an approximate estimate of $2.50 for a book of 
300 pages 6^x9 inches. Replies have been received from 10 
congregations with an aggregate estimate of 76 books. 

We deem it wise to await a greater manifestation of 
interest before planning for publication. 

Meanwhile we will solicit short biographical sketches 
(not eulogies) of all the ministers who have served or are now 
serving in our district. We will also endeavor to obtain infor- 
mation from the various congregations concerning what 
pictures of churches and persons they would desire to have 
published. 

We earnestly solicit the hearty cooperation of all the 
congregations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary. 

Report of the Historical Committee 

Since our last District Meeting slight progress has been 
made. Some additional historical data has been received. 
In March the secretary sent biographical questionnaires to the 
ministers of our district and to date has received replies from 
about two-thirds ( 70 ) . She also sent inquiries to the congrega- 
tions concerning pictures they desire to have published in the 
proposed history, to which inquiries less than half have 
responded. We are grateful for the cooperation given us. 

It is the hope of the members of the committee that there 
can be more intensive work done during the coming year. 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary. 

Report of the Secretary of the Historical Committee 

At the District Meeting in 1937 our committee was 
authorized to plan for the editing of our historical data, 
subject to the approval of District Meeting. 

After much delay we are glad to announce that one who 
is fully qualified has assented to assume the editorship of our 
history, namely, Dr. J. Linwood Eisenberg, Ex Dean of 
Instruction and Professor of Psychology of Shippensburg State 
Teachers College, and pastor of the Shippensburg Church. 

Brother Eisenberg plans, if this meets your approval, to 
have the books ready for distribution at our District Meeting 



294 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

of 1941. In order to do that it will be needful that you and 
your congregation fully cooperate by bringing your historical 
data up to date without delay; by definitely deciding very soon 
what pictures of churches and individuals you want published ; 
and by promptly attending to any matter or answering any 
communication you may receive pertaining to it. 

The following probable table of contents has been sub- 
mitted by Dr. Eisenberg for the History of the Church of the 
Brethren, Southern District of Pennsylvania : 
Index 

Table of Contents 
List of Illustrations 
Biographical Index 
Chapters 

I. Introduction 
II. Origin of Church 

1. Germany 

2. Early development in U. S. 

3. First developments in Southern District 

III. Congregations in Southern Pennsylvania 

Each congregation listed in alphabetical 
order 

IV. Missionary activities of the District 
V. District Meetings 

VI. Annual Meetings 

VII. Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 
VIII. Education 
We suggest that the publication of the history be left in 
the hands of the editor and that this meeting provide some 
plan for financing it. 

It is with much gratification that we present this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sudie M. Wingert, Secretary. 
October 30, 1940. 

Answer: That District Meeting: 

a. Authorizes the Historical Committee to proceed to 
have the History of the Church of the Brethren of Southern 
Pennsylvania published according to plan submitted ; 

b. Authorizes and requests the Board of Trustees of the 
Brethren's Home to underwrite the project without interest. 



OUR DISTRICT 

What is now known as the Southern District of Church 
of the Brethren of Pennsylvania was formerly included in the 
Middle District of Pennsylvania, which district then included 
all the territory west of the Susquehanna River and east of 
the Alleghany Mountain. In 1889 a request was made by the 



Our District 295 

Duncansville Church that District Meeting divide the district 
into two parts, naming the one Southern and the other retain- 
ing the name of Middle District of Pennsylvania. The request 
was not granted. 

In 1892 a petition was sent by the Codorus Church to the 
District Meeting asking for a division of the district for con- 
venience, etc. On motion the vote was taken which resulted 
in, 19 in favor, nine opposed, and the district was declared 
divided. (D. M. Minute, 1892.) 

"A committee was then appointed to make the division, 
and the names of the districts to be the Middle District and the 
Southern District. The Middle District will include the 
following churches : Aughwick, Altoona, Claar, Clover Creek, 
Duncansville, Fairview, Hopewell, Huntingdon, James Creek, 
Lewistown, Snake Spring, Spring Run, Warriorsmark, 
Woodbury, and Yellow Creek. The Southern District: 
Antietam, Back Creek, Codorus, Falling Springs, Lower 
Cumberland, Lower Conewago, Marsh Creek, Ridge, Upper 
Conewago, Upper Codorus, and Upper Cumberland. This 
leaves the following churches to be divided after consultation 
and their choice determined : Buffalo, Lost Creek, and Perry." 
(D. M. Minutes, May 11, 1892.) 

From the registration of delegates at the District Meeting 
in 1893 we find that Buffalo, Lost Creek and Perry Congrega- 
tions united with the Southern District. (D. M. Minute 1893.) 

The first effort to establish a definite boundary line for 
our district was made in 1911 when the following petition was 
presented to District Meeting: 

"We, the Missionary Association of the Church of the 
Brethren, at Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, do petition that the 
Antietam Congregation shall ask District Meeting of 1911, to 
confer with the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and the 
Middle District of Pennsylvania and that they together shall 
arrange geographically, a boundary line, and give to the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania that unoccupied territory 
which lies immediately north of her present territory and 
west of the Susquehanna River. 

"Passed the Antietam Congregation April 15, 1911. 

"Decided to appoint the Mission Board to confer with 
said District Meeting and arrange a boundary line." (D. M. 
Minutes, 1911, P. 4.) 

At the District Meeting in 1919 "Brother Jas. A. Sell of 
Middle District of Pennsylvania was present, representing the 
said district, in reference to a permanent boundary line 
between the districts, and presented the following for 
approval : 

" Tnasmuch as there was no definite boundary line estab- 
lished in 1892, when the Southern District of Pennsylvania was 
divided from the Middle District of the Church of the 
Brethren, therefor, as a matter of historical record and in 



296 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



order to avoid complications that may arise in opening up new 
fields of mission work, and to make legal all papers relating 
thereto, it is mutually agreed by the representatives of the 
Middle District, and the delegates of the Southern District 
assembled in conference at Mechanicsburg, October 29, 1919, 
that the eastern limits of the counties of Fulton, Huntingdon, 
Mifflin, Center, Clinton and Potter, shall be, when confirmed 
by the Middle District of Pennsylvania, the boundary line, 
separating the one district from the other/ 

"By motion it was decided that a committee of two be 
appointed to confer with the representatives of the Middle 
District of Pennsylvania, and arrange a boundary line between 
the two districts. Committee, H. M. Stover, M. A. Jacobs." 
(D. M. Minutes 1919, P. 11.) 

This committee submitted their report for ratification to 
District Meeting of Southern Pennsylvania in 1920, "the same 
having been approved by the Middle District". "The 
boundary line as presented was accepted." (D. M. Minute 
1920, P. 9.) 

At the District Meeting of 1921 the committee of district 
boundary line was asked to make a restatement of the line. 
"The correct statement reads : 'The district boundary line shall 
be as follows : Beginning at the Middle District of Maryland, 
about the middle of Fulton County, thence northward to 
Huntingdon County, so as not to interfere with territory occu- 
pied by either the Middle District, or the Southern District in 
said county, thence along the eastern limits of Huntingdon and 
Mifflin Counties to the northeastern limits, thence northward 
through Center and Clinton Counties, adjusting the line so as 
not to interfere with territory occupied by either district, to 
the Clinton and Lycoming County line, thence to southeastern 
limit of Potter County and along the eastern county line of 
Potter, north to the New York State line, shall be the eastern 
boundary of the Middle District, and the western boundary of 
the Southern District of Pennsylvania. Signed, H. M. Stover 
and M. A. Jacobs'." (D. M. Minute 1921, P. 4.) 



DISTRICT MEETINGS 

From "A History of the Church of the Brethren in the 
Middle District of Pennsylvania", page 187, we glean the 
following which was copied fro#i written records : 

"In obedience to the advice of the Old Brethren at several 
Annual Meetings, the churches of Pennsylvania embraced in 
that part of the state, lying between the Alleghany Mountain, 
and the Susquehanna River; did agree, to form a district, to 
be known and denominated as 'The Middle District of 
Pennsylvania'. 



Our District 297 

"Accordingly a meeting being called ; and was held in the 
Aughwick Congregation, Huntingdon County, on Ascension 
Day, 1891. The proceedings of said meeting were published 
in the 'Gospel Visitor', to which reference can be had. The 
brethren attending said meeting were all favorably inclined 
to continue the 'District Meetings' annually. But as none of 
the elders had consulted their respective churches, before 
leaving home, it could not be decided where the next meeting 
should be. However, a corresponding secretary was 
appointed, with authority to decide on the place of next meet- 
ing; to whom application was to be made by those willing to 
take the meeting. And the time for holding said meetings 
was agreed, should be on 'Easter'. 

"By virtue of the authority vested in his hands, the secre- 
tary gave due notice to the churches embraced in the district ; 
that the next meeting (God willing) would be held in Clover 
Creek church, James Creek meeting house, Huntingdon 
County. The proceedings of said meeting were likewise in- 
serted in the 'Gospel Visitor', but also considered necessary to 
be put on the district church record." 

Organization of District Meeting 

"April 21-22, A.D. 1862. Daniel M. Holsinger, the former 
secretary, retained in office. Names of delegates from 
Aughwick church, J. G. Glock, J. Spanogle; Perry church, 
Jacob Spanogle, John Eby ; Lost Creek, David Myers, Michael 
Bashore ; Buffalo Valley, Isaac Myers, Charles Royer ; Lewis- 
town, Joseph R. Hanawalt, William Howe; Warriors Mark, 
Grabill Myers; Clover Creek, Isaac Brumbaugh, Daniel M. 
Holsinger; Snakespring Valley, Henry Clapper; Upper 
Conewago, Adam Brown." 

With the probable exception of a few years, District 
Meetings thereafter were held annually. The History of 
Middle Pennsylvania records 29 District Meetings before the 
division of the district. It is of interest to note that of these 16 
were held in the territory which is now included in the 
Southern District, as follows: Antietam, 1885; Buffalo Valley, 
1868, 1888; Codorus, 1876; Lost Creek, 1865, 1877, 1884; 
Lower Conewago, 1881; Lower Cumberland, 1872, 1892; 
Marsh Creek, 1879, 1890; Upper Codorus, 1874; Upper 
Conewago, 1881; Upper Cumberland, 1866, 1887. 

The first District Meeting after the formation of the 
Southern District was held in the Codorus Church on April 19, 
1893, at which time the 14 churches which composed the 
Southern District were represented as follows : 

Antietam, Jacob Snider, J. F. Oiler; Back Creek, Jno. 
Lehner, Daniel Miller; Buffalo, Isaiah Beaver; Codorus, Jacob 
Shamberger, C. Ness; Falling Springs, Wm. A. Anthony; Wm. 
C. Koontz ; Lower Cumberland, Daniel Landis, Henry 



298 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Beelman; Lower Conewago, Hez. Cook, E. Goughnour; 
Lost Creek, J. A. Smith, John Hart; Marsh Creek, J. W. 
Deardorff, C. L. Pf outz ; Perry, Wm. B. Zimmerman; Ridge, 
C. F. Hosfeld; Upper Conewago, D. H. Baker, Peter Brown; 
Upper Codorus, Moses Mummart, A. Baugher; Upper 
Cumberland, Albert Hollinger, S. M. Stouffer. 

'The meeting was organized by electing J. F. Oiler, 
Moderator; Jacob Hollinger, Reading Clerk; Wm. A. 
Anthony, Secretary. 

"The meeting being now declared ready for business, the 
fourteen churches that compose the Southern District of 
Pennsylvania responded 'No Papers', something which has few 
if any precedents. It needs no comment." (D. M. Minutes 
1893, P. 2.) 

Gleanings from District Meeting Minutes 

1892 — The District Meeting for the Southern District in 
1893 will be held in the Codorus church at Logansville, 
Wednesday, five weeks before Whit Sunday. 

1894 — A motion was made, That the District Meeting 
hereafter be held not later than four weeks prior to Whit- 
suntide or may be earlier if the church holding the District 
Meeting sees fit to do so. Passed. 

1896 — Decided to hold District Meeting hereafter on 
Wednesday five weeks prior to Whitsuntide. 

1911 — In response to a petition from Upper Codorus Con- 
gregation it was decided to hold District Meeting hereafter on 
second Wednesday in April so that more time may be given 
for the publishing of queries for Annual Meeting. 

1913 — April 9, York and Back Creek Congregations 
asked that the time for holding District Meeting be changed 
to fall of the year. Decided to have it the last Wednesday m 
October beginning with October 29, 1913. 

Place of Holding District Meetings 

1911 — Falling Spring Congregation petitioned that here- 
after District Meeting shall go from place to place in alpha- 
betical order. Passed, with privilege given to each 
congregation to make different arrangements if necessary. 

Election of Officers 

1896 — (Page 25) A request was made by the York 
Church that "All officers of District Meeting, Ministerial 
Meeting and Sunday School Meeting, also members on Stand- 
ing Committee, be elected by majority vote. Passed favorably 
by District Meeting." 



Our District 



299 



1899 — Decided that hereafter the officers of District 
Meeting be elected by ballot. 

1931 — (Page 26) In reply to a request from the Waynes- 
boro Congregation it was decided to elect the moderator of 
District Meeting one year in advance as is now done by Annual 
Conference. 









a. 






1930 — A new office was created — District Field Man. 

1933 — Name of District Field Man changed to Conference 
Budget Man. 

Elders' Meetings 

1897 — (Page 3) Decided that at all subsequent meetings, 
the Elder's meeting shall be held the day prior to the District 
Meeting. 

1902 — Rules governing Elders meetings and District 
Meetings were adopted. 



4* 

'i- 









1926— (P. 25) In response to requests from York and 
Falling Spring Congregations it was decided that the Minis- 
terial Board of our district should compile an official directory 
of our district similar to the eastern Pennsylvania directory. 



Number of Elders (With Names), Ministers, Deacons, 

Members, Church Houses, Union Houses and Places of 

Worship in the Southern District of Pennsylvania' 1 " 



















a. 
31 


















v. 

o 


93 














1 


fe 








•- 


88 


as 




* 





-— 


•2 


99 




s 

a 




CO 


£ 




• 

■X 


a 

CO 


— - 


& 

* 






* 


* 


~ 

s 




Antietam*" 




4 


14 


500 


3 




5 


2 


Back Creek 


Daniel Miller- 
John Lehner 


4 


10 


250 


3 




8 


1 


Buffalo 


John L. Beaver 


5 


9 


83 


3 




8 


1 


Codorus 


Christian Ness 


5 


1 


179 


3 


1 


4 


1 


Falling Spring 


William C Koontz 


1 


10 


243 


J 


1 


6 


1 


Lower Cumberland 


Isaac Barto 


.', 


10 


250 


5 




12 


1 


Lower Conewago 


Emanual Gochenour 


6 


7 


210 


5 




5 


2 


Lost Creek 


Solomon Seiber 
Andrew Bashor 


10 


10 


255 


1 




8 


1 


Marsh Creek 


C L. Pfoutz 


3 


5 


130 


3 


■1 


(i 


1 


Perry 


E. D. Book 


5 


6 


82 


2 


1 


x 


2 


Ridge 


John R. Fcglesanger 
Henry Etter 


7 


6 


120 


1 




s 


1 


Upper Conewago 


Peter Brown 


6 




345 


5 




6 


1 


Upper Codorus 


Aaron Baugher 


7 


7 


275 


5 




7 


3 


Upper Cumberland 


Daniel Keller- 
John Stamy 
Jacob Hollinger 


7 


11 


280 


3 


1 


9 




York ::::::::: 




1 


1 


175 


1 




1 



18 82 122 3377 53 6 101 

*D. M. Minutes 1897. 
•♦Elder Jacob F. Oiler died in February, 1897, and Antietam was without an elder at tfame of 
D. M. which was held May 5, in that year. 
***No resident elder at this time. 



300 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

MISSIONARY MEETINGS AT DISTRICT MEETING 

April 12, 1899 — One hour was devoted to the cause of 
missions. Short addresses were made by Elders J. A. Long, 
S. F. Sanger, G. N. Falkenstein, Jacob Hollinger and others, 
after which a collection of $28 was lifted to be used in home 
mission work. (D. M. Minute.) 

At District Meeting of 1916 the following petition was 
presented and acted upon favorably : 

"We, the Upper Conewago Church assembled in council 
meeting August 26, 1916, ask District Meeting of Southern 
Pennsylvania assembled at Hanover, Pennsylvania, October 
25, 1916, to decide to hold a missionary meeting, during sub- 
sequent District Meetings, one hour prior to organization. 
This meeting to be composed of a missionary sermon and also 
a collection for Home Missions. Each congregation in the dis- 
trict to hold a special collection prior to the meeting and send 
with the delegates for the above purpose. The program for 
missionary meeting to be arranged by Mission Board." (D. M. 
Minutes 1916.) 

Following is a list of speakers and contributions received 
at the missionary meeting of our District Meetings since then : 

1917— J. A. Long $ 459.62 

1918—1. W. Taylor and Galen B. Royer_ 795.66 

1919— James A. Sell 967.63 

1920— C. D. Bonsack 1,522.06 

1921— C. H. Steerman 937.13 

1922— J. M. Moore 950.40 

1923 — J. E. Rowland 

1924— H. H. Nye 1,137.85 

1925— J. 1. Baugher 1,064.92 

1926 — M. A. Jacobs and J. W. Lear 1,252.42 

1927— C. L. Baker 1,619.26 

1928— J. M. Moore 11,183.17 

1929— A. C. Baugher 1,126.49 

1930— C. D. Bonsack 1,156.27 

1931— S. C. Godfrey and L. K. Ziegler__ 976.82 

1932 — Spencer Minnich, also Slides, 

"Our Women at Work" 814.57 

1933 — Ida Shoemaker 558.64 

1934 — Faye Moyer 417.69 

1935— C. D. Bonsack 555.10 

1936— H. Stover Culp 793.65 

1937 — Minor E. Myers 710.00 

1938—1. E. Oberholtzer 454.05 

1939 — Desmond Bittinger 688.84 

1940 — Edward K. Ziegler 666.76 



Our District 301 

ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE 

District Meeting 1915. Paper (16) from York Church. 

Since there seems to be a general conviction that our 
schools should be owned and controlled by the several State 
Districts convenient to them and since the General Education 
Board of the Church of the Brethren strongly urges such a 
course, and since the Eastern District of Pennsylvania has 
under advisement the taking over of the Elizabethtown 
College and has invited both the Southeastern District of Penn- 
sylvania, Southeastern New York and New Jersey, and the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania to join us in this movement: 

Therefore will this District Meeting appoint a committee 
to cooperate with similar committees from the other district or 
districts to work out a plan to be reported at a future meeting. 

Paper passed by District Meeting with the understanding 
that the committee appointed under it be authorized only to 
report to District Meeting as to the advisability of joining in 
to take over the school. 

Committee, D. K. Trimmer, H. H. Hollinger. 

1916 — Committee on Elizabethtown College continued. 

1917 — The committee appointed to consider "The 
advisability of the proposition that this district join the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania in the ownership and control 
of Elizabethtown College", gave a favorable report which was 
accepted. In this report it was suggested that the Eastern 
District should have eight and the Southern District four 
representatives on the Board of Trustees. 

Trustees of Elizabethtown College (Giving Year Elected) 

1918 — J. H. Keller, three years; C. R. Oellig, two years; 
A. S. Baugher, two years; C. L. Baker, one year. 

1919— C. L. Baker. 

1920— A. S. Baugher, C. R. Oellig. 

1921— J. H. Keller. 

1923— A. S. Baugher, C. R. Oellig. 

1924— J. H. Keller. 

1925— C. L. Baker. 

1926— C. R. Oellig, A. S. Baugher. 

1927— J. H. Keller. 

1928 — C. L. Baker, J. L. Myers, two years unexpired term 
of J. H. Keller, deceased. 

1929— A. S. Baugher, C. R. Oellig, G. W. Harlacher (one 
year unexpired term of J. L. Myers). 

1930 — C. E, Brown. 

1931— C. L. Baker. 

1932— C. R. Oellig, A. S. Baugher. 

1933— C. E, Grapes. 

1934— C. L. Baker. 



302 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

1935 — c. R. Oellig, N. S. Sellers, A. S. Baugher (two year 
unexpired term of C. L. Baker, deceased). 
1936 — J. E. Trimmer. 
1937 — C. E. Grapes. 
1938 — N. S. Sellers, G. Howard Danner. 
1939 — J. E. Trimmer. 
1940 — C. E. Grapes. 



DISTRICT TREASURER 

1881 — Jacob Hollinger elected district treasurer of 
Middle District to succeed Daniel Keller. 

1896 — Jacob Hollinger requested to be relieved of office 
of district treasurer, "which office he held faithfully for 16 

years". 

1898 — O. V. Long (10 years). 
1908 — C. R. Oellig (five years). 
1911 — J. H. Brindle (six years). 
1917 — J. E. Myers (term expires 1942). 



DISTRICT SUNDAY SCHOOL SECRETARY 

District Meeting minutes: 

1903 — W. A. Anthony reappointed district Sunday school 

secretary for one year. 

1905 — W. A. Anthony resigned ; J. H. Keller elected. 

1908 — J. H. Keller reelected. 

1907 — "We the York Church petition District Meeting to 
give the delegates of the Sunday school meeting the privilege 
of electing the district Sunday school secretary." Paper 
passed. The present district Sunday school secretary was re- 
elected to serve until the next Sunday school meeting. 

Sunday school meeting minutes : 

1907 — J. H. Keller reelected. 

1910 — J. H. Keller reelected for three years. 

District Meeting minutes : 

1914 Page 2. Hanover: Inasmuch as it seems almost 

impossible for the Sunday school secretary to visit each and all 
Sunday schools in the district in a year and while the district 
is large and covers much territory, thereby being expensive to 
reach the remote schools, therefore we the Hanover Church 
petition District Meeting to appoint two assistants. Said 
assistants to be appointed in such territory as most convenient 
to their duties. In answer . . . that District Meeting elect 
the Sunday school secretary according to Annual Meeting 
minutes of June 23, 1914, and that district Sunday school 



Our District 303 

secretary appoint his assistants to work with him where most 
convenient. They to hand their expenses to the secretary who 
will present all to the district for payment. No election 
recorded. 

!917 — J. H. Keller reelected. (A paper to make this 
office of three years duration, beginning with current year, 
was passed.) 

1920 — Page 13. J. H. Keller tendered his resignation as 
district Sunday school secretary. Resignation accepted. 
Howard Danner elected for three years. 

1923 — Howard Danner elected for three years. 

1926 — Howard Danner elected for three years. 

1929 — Howard Danner elected for three years. 

1932 — Howard Danner elected for three years. 

1934 — Page 13. By recommendation of Board of Chris- 
tian Education the office of district Sunday school secretary 
was discontinued. 







0) 

*- 


r/» 


u 

0) 

be 
PS 


ph 


pH 


PH 


^rC 

rt; be 




be 

ctS 
rQ 

a 




rP 

be 

p 

OS 






z 

Q 

- 

3C 


H 


s 



u 

.£ 

c 
* 

en 


V9 

V 

bfl 

Q 


•P a) cd cd 

^2 be ^ be be 

o Q ^ cd Q Q 

. o cd o o o a) 

CDp^ ^^ rHp-n ^^ 

>»<d cd cd Q, cd a? u 

^C CS ^C SJ 
oS aS oS g a a oS 

i-JQ PP £p P^ 


OSrQ 

oS 3 

> 

CD 5 

02 rQ 

o o 


OS 

Q 

oS 

03 hri 

rH 1 ^ 

CD . 

^rQ 

o P 
03 « 

* o 

H t-3 


P PH -° 

^PQ ^43 rH § 

CD CD Q CD g 

p-H • r— ( ._, p^ PH 
CD p^; 

02 hr\ 02 02 ai ?** 
CD _7 CD <!> 

02 02 C 02 <-! 

So ^^ ^h 


fH rH pH m 

, CD CD CD ,2 M rP 

rl-P -P rH Th N CD 

^)Q Po-P^ ^0Q 

02 03 02 -. 02 " 02 
CD CD CD ^ CD • .CD 

ggggg^gg 
fcrHlrf oS ctf rt _ ■ ►>. cC 

^r-3 r-3 1-3 r-a O |> r-3 


< 


U 
















rQ 


rQ 


pQ 








Z 


5 

en 






pQ 

be 


pQ 

be 


pQ 

be 


bJO 


rQ 

be 


be 

oS 


be 

oS 


be 

oS 








< 
> 




• 


3 

as 

,Q 


3 
OS 

rQ 


OS 

pQ 


OS 

rQ 


3 

OS 

rQ 


rQ 

a 


rQ 


rQ 

a 


PH 

CD 


pH 
CD 


rP 

m P ^ &1 rH r-l 


S 




J- 

4) 


B 


a 


a 


a 


a 




3 

PH 


p 

rH 


3 


3 


<U S CD CD CD 'Tl 

-»j 2 -p p J; cd 

•Q g *U •-* O 

p g p p 

W ^ 03 02 ,-. W2 
CD CD CD -^ <U 

a g a a s a 


2 


2 

Ul 




no 


3 

pH 

PQ 

bJO 
o 


p 

PQ 

CD 

be 
o 


p 

PQ 

CD 

be 

rH 

o 


J3 

PQ 

bJO 

rH 
O 


p 

PH 
PQ 

CD 

be 

pH 

o 


PQ 

PQ 
>» 

pH 


n 

PQ 

rH 


PQ 

PQ 

rH 
rH 

OS 


o 

s 

6 


O 

• 
• 

o 


a* 


h 

D 

O 
en 






cd 
O 




<D 
O 


<D 


CD 

o 


aJ 


oS 


Q 

»-3 


Q 

•-3 


oS ^ oS oS oS oS 

p-j O •-S r-a r-3 r-3 


u- 






%i 


H 


rH 


rH 


PH 












^ .Q rQ pQ rQ rQ 


O 






CD 

be 


0) 

be 


<D 

bJO 


0) 
bJO 


CD 

be 












be be be be be be 

p £ p p p p 










P 


Q 


?i 


PH 


Q 












cd oS oS oS d oS 


U 


z 




>» 


03 

1— H 

o 


• l-H 

02 
O 


03 

'o 


• rH 

O 


• rH 

03 

'o 


rQ 

be 

^3 


pQ 

be 


rP 

be 
p 


rQ 

be 


PH 


Xi Xi rQ pQ pQ rQ 

a a a a a a 




o 






a 


H 


ffi 


ffi 


H 


^ 


OS 


oS 


oS 


CD 


p p p p p p 

rH rH rH rH rH rH 


5 

H 
en 




4) 

h 
u 
0) 


s 


S 


§ 


a 


^ 


a 

PH 


rQ 

a 


rQ 

a 

p 


rQ 

a 

rH 


Q 

• rH 
P 


^^ ^^1 1 1 1 1 

pq pq PQ PQ pQ PQ 
pq pq PQ pq pq PQ 


5 


z 




en 


0) 


0) 


<D 

• rH 


<D 

• rH 


CD 

• rH 


PQ 


PQ 


P5 

• 


pq 


02 
CD 


?H ^ PH pH rH rH 




U3 






p 


q 


C 


c 


Q 


6 


d 


o 


6 


oS 

t-3 


p Q P Q Q P 


U3 


a: 
< 






03 
P 


oS 
P 


oS 
P 


OS 

p 


OS 

P 


CD 

o 


CD 

o 


CD 
O 


CD 
O 


CD CD Op" CD CD <!> 


Q 






























Q 


X 


























rH 










« 


CO 


02 


<D 


w 

pH 

CD 


pH 

CD 


02 
pH 
CD 


02 
PH 

CD 


PH 

CD 


rH 
CD 


PH 

CD 


CD 

be 

, , P 

fH rH pH --H 

^ CD CD CD ^ 

^ P^ 5 P 5 n, ° 


X 




0) 
O 


pH 


pH 

CD 


s 


S 


S 


^ 


^ 


r— I 


• rH 


• i—t 


aOOO |B 


H 


en 






s 


1—1 

• rH 


r— I 
• rH 


• r^ 


• rH 


• f—t 


£ 


^ 


^ 


§ &; ^ &; 5 oi 




2 








rQ 


rQ 


rQ 


rQ 


rQ 


02 


02 


02 


5R rQ rQ rQ 


U- 






o 


O 


>» 


>» 


>» 


>» 


>> 


CD 


CD 


CD 


^ o o o A fl 


O 


O 

P 






oS 
OS 

03 

1— I 


OS 

03 

1— 1 


oS 

o 


OS 

pH 

o 


OS 

PH 

O 


OS 

pH 

o 


pH 

O 


O 


02 

o 


72 

o 

s 


g S O S a rQ 

h cd oS oS r> O 


a 


< 


























T3 


z 

H 


a 

as 

a 




0) 




CD 


>> 


o 

be 

OS 
CD 


T3 
Q 

r2 

CD 

rQ 

a 

o 


02 
pH 

o 

O 

O 






r* 


o 

be 

OS 

CD 


-P Q 
Q cri 

^ >> CD 

CD CD _^ rQ 

-2 ^ « a 


S 


2 

O 






p* 

CD 
CD 

pH 


a 

p 


13 
> 



O 

O 


02 


CD 
CD 

PH 


CD 
CD 

rH 


Q 
o 

O 


^ a * g § 
$ a3 > 5^ 

O -^ rH Ph J-! rH 

<^ CD OS ^ CD 


H 
U 


u 






o 

HO 


rH 

cd 


o 


pH 

CD 

Oh 


PH 

CD 


PH 

CD 
ft 


P 

rH 
O 

73 


o 

02 


rQ 

in 


rH 

CD 










O 
h5 


P 


3 


Q. 

& 


O 


ft 
P 


O 


o 
hQ 


<8 


O 

r-Q 


Q ft p O © 

^ <j p pq g ,-Q 








lO 


CO 


00 


o 


(M 


rf 


CO 


t- 


Oi 


rH 


t^ LO t- 00 O CM 


mm 








CO 


CO 


CO 


t> 


t> 


t- 


t' 


t- 


t- 


00 


00 00 00 00 OS C5 


a 








00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


(X) 00 00 00 00 00 






0) 

E 


l—l 


rH 


T— 1 


T-i 


tH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH rH rH rH rH rH 












rH 










■s 

rH 






»> «s »> »> 

CO 00 "^ LO iH 








H 






rH 
OS 

s 










>» 

rt 

^ 






rH CM CM ^H 

OS CL OS OS 03 



BS 

O (t 

bn"aJ 

C 



< 

m 

Z 

z 

Ou 

U. 
O 

h 

u 
2 



Z 
OS 

u 

X 
H 
D 

O 

to 

bu 
O 

to 
O 

z 

H 
U 
U 

H 
U 

2 






h 
— 

fa 
y 

en 



u 



id 

0) 

T3 





u 



bo 

© N 



fan b£ 

CD c 

bo © 

c l-q 

• I— I ^^ 

o a> 

03 O 



© © 

o o 

c © 

• • 



N 
fa, •§ 

.2 O 

S! ^ 

O Ph 



44 
o 

o 



s © 

o o 

^Q ffl £ pq 

C ,© • 

<« o J P 



bfi 

c 

o 



fa, 

O 

f-3 



3 © 

CO 
co 

3 bJD 

fe © 

O »|M 

o os 



fa< 

CD 

bo 
C 



o 

O 

cj 
as 



O 

,© 
O 

t-3 



fa. 
CD 

© 

r© 

CD 

PI 

,© 

o 

•~3 



fan 
CD 
bX) 



o 

pq W 

^r ,© 
o 

cd 
03 



N 
-t-> 

© 



u 



bo 

© 
o 

•J 



• - 



w 



o 
t 

o3 
PQ 

cj 

03 

w 



© 

o 
PQ 

P 

W 



c 

o 

© 



a 



fa, 

a; 



co 



fan 

cd 

A! 

03 

PQ 



a 



© 

o 

A 
-fa> 

© 



£ 



cd 



CO 



C C C fi c c c 

o o o o o o o 

rfi ,CJ ^3 ,& ,C ^3 ^5 

-fa» ^_» ^j ^j ^j -fa> ^j 

c c C C C C fi 

^ << <j <: <j < < 

< < < < < < < 

£ £ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



fa- 

o 
bo 
C 



fa. 

OJ 

W 

o 



bO O t! g 

^ Ph pq pq 

P E J « P 

W b O h w 



o 
o 

P3 



o 


S 


bo 




Cone 
Berl 






fa, 02 


u-g 


CU o3 


jj ° 


£W 


wO 


Ph 


o 


p 


h3 












£ 

P ^ >- 



^5 

o 

CO 

<D 
ft, co 

-S g 

<n .i-h fa, 

p^ o 



oJ bo 

•n ^ 

fa, 3 

£ ° 

O 03 

fa, o 

0) <D 

o 



bo 
C 

o 

•J 

t-3 



w 
^^ 

©-pq 
©, 



c 
o 

-fa3 

© 



©_d 

b07^ 

|S 

§ ^ 

£pq 
o 



fan 

03 

PQ 
ci 

03 
en 



©O 
b0^ 

© fa, 
© Q) 

© CQ 
. -fa» 

fa, CO 

O) 03 

P 



© 
o 

-fa» 

© 

<»1 



bfi 

c 

o 



© 
o 

-fa> 

© 
< 



" <^ £ 
^ ^ ^ 



c © 

03 bo 

cqffi 



a) 



©42 







bO 


bO 
























o 

o 

pq 


© 

03 

£ 

'a) 

pq 


© 

c 

• 

> 


C 
o 

.-q 
> 


fan 

a) 

© 
o 

-fa5 

CO 


bO 

© 

o 


© 

o 

i-q 


© 
O 


fa, 

a; 

© 
o 
-♦-> 

CO 


fa, 
cy 

^3 
03 

PQ 


fa, 

0) 

© 

o 
*3 

CO 


fa, 
d 

^3 
03 

pq 


fa, 
(1) 

^© 

© 
o 

CO 


fa, 

^*3 
03 

PQ 


fa, 

> 

o 
-faj 

CO 


• 

p 

• 


© 


• l-H 


• P-H 


• 


• 

<1 


• 


• 

> 

• 


• 


• 
• 


• 


• 

• 


• 


• 
• 


a 

• 


W 


w 


o 


c 


CO 


•-3 


•-5 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CJ 


CO 


CJ 


w 



fa, 




^ 




CD 






£ 


fa, 


> 


fa, 

<D 


> 

o 
-fa) 


fa, 

CD 


fa, 

0) 


^3 




O 


;zj 




1— 1 


QJ 


•l-H 


-fa» 


•l-H 


CO 


• l-H 


0) 


h5 


S 


CO 


a 


a 


a 


d 


CO 


• 


CO 


a 


co 


w 


d 


W 


ffi 


W 


K 


W 


• 

•-3 



o 
fa, 

^ © 
O o 



r© 

o 

fa, 

© 



a. 

© 

^ ft O 
03 o 

pq cj 



X3 

03 bO 

•— , fa, 

^ © 
2*© 

© W 

C >I-H 
© C 

O 03 
^3 

fa, o 
<D <D 

l S 

,-q 



CD 

bO 
© 



o 



fa, 
o 



00 r}< W CD t- CX)OiOrH(M CO Tf LO 

Oi OJ Oi Oi Ci OiClOOO o o o 
000000 00 00 0000©iCiCi C7i Oi Ci 



0) 

.5 oT csT of 



CD t— 00 C5 

o o o o 

Ci OS Oi Ci 



P, 03 



OS 



00 

• 

fa, 
Ph 

< 



Lft 



03 



Ol OJ -^ CD 00 O 

01 r-\ rH (M i-l Ol Ol 

^ faj ^ ^ fa^ f^ j4 

a p^ ©, o, a p p 

<J <t <J <J <U <U <J 



Ol 



03 



CD 



>» fa,* >» 
OS ft. oS 

s -< § 



00 

oa 

fa, 
P 



4) 



2 

< 
> 

CO 

2 
2 

uj 

u- 
O 

H 
U 

2 

H 
en 



2 
CC 

X 

H 

D 

O 
in 

u- 
O 

CO 

O 

2 

h 

w 



H 
en 



E 

£ 

o 

CJ 

ba 

C 
*p< 

C 



(0 

4) 

■4-> 
« 

bn 
J) 

U 

O 





S 



4) 
U 



4) 



fa fa 
<D <D 

o3 v-j 



O 



bolo".^ 
o <d 



M^ <iH ^O 
OH ^ QCJ 



fa 

CD 

be 

03ffi 

PQ 
. fa 

d3 



■ i— t QJ 

I— H >— t 
i— H I— t 

OS 
Ptfto 



- 

CD 
OS 



bO 

o 



«J 



4< 



fa 

CD 

bo 

3 *> 

^° 

fa . 

CDr£ 



fa - 
CD CD 

^^ 
o3r^ 

PQ§ 



fa 

CD 
co 

o 



bo 
O Q3 



fa 
0) 

03 



m 

O 



pqfo 



fa 
cd 
to 

o 

coPQ 



fa 

CD 
> 
O 



CO 

O 

O 

o3 



0) 



<73 



- 
CD 



fa 

cd 



pq»-3 



„^ ^„ iJod <j| ^H S| _H 

~-J • . . 03 . . . 03 . • 






0) OS 

JPQ 



COffi 

co'i-j Ph'cj 





>k 


fa 









fa 


C 


bo 


fa 






4) 


o 


pj 


CD 


fa 


u 


TJ 


,£3 


•i— i 


p— H 


CD 


CD 


CC 


-»-» 


l~~] 


r£ 


> 


> 


4) 


C 


o 


O 


o 


o 


K 


<< 


a 


a 


CO 


CO 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 

a 




£ 


«i 


• 

1-3 


w 


a 



CO 
O 
oS 

►"9 



fa 
0) 

bo 

oJ 
PQ 



- 

OS 
Q 

o 



co K 



0) 

bO 

OS 

PQ 

CO 



>» 


fa. 




>» 




fa 


fa 






0^ 




fa 

4) 
fa 
O 
4) 
CO 


o 


fai 

> 

o 
•+J 

CO 


o 


> 


bo 

• i-H 

'o 


0) 

bo 
•i— • 

r— 1 

'o 

ffi 


fa 


•l-H 
fa 

PQ 


fa 

o 

a 

•i— i 


fa 

m 
O 

PQ 




Q 


s 


p 


<< 


H 


a 


ffi 


w 


d 


• 

•-a 




fe 


w 


ti 


<i 


ffi 


h5 


• 

Ha 


hj 


PQ 


i-s 



fa 

OJ 

PQ 



O 



O 

o 

fa 
o 

w 



bO 

o 

hQ 

i-a 



^3 
® o 



fa 

0) 



CO 



fa 
o 

A fa 

o 



o 

hQ 



fa 

bo 



o 

<i ^ w 

o 

^ ^ < 



fa 

PQ 



fa 

0) 



CO 



fa 

PQ 



O 



bo 

o 
hQ 



! o5 o^ 



U 

o 

fa 

O kJT rJ ^ 



§ bo 



^ CO 



o> 



r /2 



^5 



W 



S S fa^ « 

^ ^D ^ PQ CJ 



> 
fa 

•F- 1 



O 
OS 



Oi 



cq CO CO Tf 

Oi 05 Oi Ol 



bo^ 

.a a 

far^J 

ftCJ 
CO 

b0^ 



OS 



fa 

> 

o 

Ci 



fa 

O 



fa 7-J 
O o 

^O 
o 

OS 



©on 

fa^ 

^PQ 
o 

hQ 



00 

1—1 
Oi 



O 

t-3 



fa 

> 
O 

CO 



fa 

03 

PQ 
CJ 



T3 

03 bo 
fag 

CJ S 

fa « 

^^ 

o 
hQ 

Oi 



03 

bO 

W 

1-5 



CO 

o 

03 

•-a 



bo 
o 

^3 



<V 
<D 
fa 

CJ 

CO 

fa 
03 



O 
CM 

Oi 



CO 



fa 
p. 

< 



CM 



03 



O Ci OS 00 t> 
rH CM CM CM 

<J <J o o o 



U3 
CM 



o 



CO 



O 



CM 

■ 

O 



CM 

O 



CM 



O 



fa 

I— I 
t-5 



fa 
> 

o 

CO 



fa 

03 

PQ 



CJ 



a 

03 

CO 

03 

E 



CM 



CD 

IS 

03 



<D 

03 

o 



CO 

O 

o 

o3 
i-a 



fa 

CD 



CO 
W 

CD 



CD 

bo 

03 
PQ 



CO 



s «i 



fal 

CD 
> 
o 

CO 



a «i s <i a 
k a k a w 



fa 

CD 
03 

PQ 
CJ 



CM 



o 
O 



> 


A 


o 


CJ 


fa 




O 


fa 

CD 


CO 


bO 


*v 


CJ 


fa 

CD 


o3 

CO 


erry, 
Farm 


CD bO 


b0 r O 


Ph 


P4 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


C75 


Oi 


i-H 


i—( 


T^ 


•1 

O 


CM 


CO 


• 


* 


O 


o 






2 

> 

>■ 

CO 

2 
W 

b 

O 

y 
2 

H 
en 



2 

X 

ac 

H 
D 
O 

U- 

O 

in 
O 

2 

H 

Ui 

y 

5 

H 



& ^ 

o a 

U bo 

4) 

.9 Q 

C 
CO 



4) 

ni 



u 



■4-> 

h 
4) 

no 
o 






a) 

p3 

3 3 
O as 

hQPQ 

<jco 



pH 
p* 

03 



cd 



U 

v 



v 



x 

CD o 
cj 



08 G ^S ^p2 

mg pqg w^ 5 

hQCO J CO ffi^ 



CD 

s * 

3 CD 



a? 

ph 
o 
o 



03 

- 



p-l 

CD 
p* 

as 



> 
O 



w 

CD rH 
ft CD 

aS^ 

PQ^ o 



as 

ft 



ft 

o 

pH 



CD 
O 



ft 

o 



• • • • _ ^ - ,J^ \. j ^^fc. 



s ^ 
•c ° 



CD 



w ^ CD 

s ^ 

9.B3 

cd as 



T3 

c 

o 



03 03 £h 

CD ?-t <D 

aS35 «J 

?m CD ^ 



•r cd as b T X«S 



*i< dw dw ^g ^^ ^^ dK dd d^ ffip£ ^co ^_j<ir-; d£,-i 



X 

po 

O 

as 
»-3 



w 



p-< 

CD 
> 

O 

CO 



<d g 



pH 


PH 


CD 


CD 


35 


p* 


CD 


as 


w 


PQ 



cj 



03 
O 

w 

as 

•-3 



p- 
"cd 



p3 cT . 

§ asU 

^ y ^ aj 
O o CD •+-» 

O^OJJ CD 

ft^ ft^ 



£> P 



3 



> 

o 



O! p-h 



W S ffi 



ns 

■4-> 

0) 


be 


CD 

o 
o 




CD 


CO 


CD 

o 


s 


•i— ( 


CD 
CO 




tf 


s 


W 


CO 




• 


• 

1-8 


• 

t-8 


& 



CD 
03 

PQ 

d 



o 

CO 

CD 

OS 



>» 






CD 






^5 

1j 


CD 


pH 


03 


s 


CD 

O 


s 


a 




• ^H 


-^> 


r _l 


rH 


CO 


CD 


H 




03 


w 


• 

s 


•r— t 






s 


• 

1-3 


ffi 



CD 
pH 

O 

o 



x 

pO 

o 

as 
>-3 



pH 

O 



>. 

CD 

pH 

«H 

O 

O 

CO 



PH 

CD 

p^ 

as 

d 



X 

■CD 

£^ 

as 

o 






pC 

p3 w 

O pH 

3 #* 

< 











pH 












CD 










P-. 


>» 










CD 


2 


>» 


pH 

CD 


03 

<D 

ft 


X 

O 


be 

CD 

•r— I 


CD 


CD 

pH 


X 


03 


u 


N 


73 


pH 


as 




3 


O 


O 


o 


r-3 

• 


^ 


PQ 


O 


• 


H 





• p-h 

> ... 


• 


• 


^ 


d 


s 


CD 
pJ 


• 


CO 



X 

pH 

CD 

i— ^ 

P^-H 

CD 
CO 


CD 

PH 

O 

O 


PH 

CD 
CD 

H 


X 

pH 

CD 

ID 
CO 


c 

as 

1 

O 


p-. 
CD 

p3 
bX 

3 
OS 

PQ 


CO 


• 


p^ 


CO 


H 


H 


• 


CO 


►j 


S5 


• 


W 



X 

pQ 
O 

CD 

<^ 

r-3 



CD 

(51 



PH 

> 

o 

CO 



W 





Ph 




pH 

•1/ 


CD 

£ 


pH 

CD 


as 
PQ 


•i— i 

PH 


> 

O 

co 


• 


w 


S 


• 

CJ 


• 

t-5 


w 



.-p3 
ojo cj 
3 ^ 

^p3 



PQ CJ 



X 

pH 

O 

O 
CJ 



ft 
CO 



CJ Jz 



o 



.9 « 

3W 
03 



03 
x 

3 

3 

W 



3 
»> oS 

CD 3 

^J PH 

CD 

w PQ 
O 



pH 

p3 

3 
OS 

PQ 
W 
W 



X 
< 

•s 

PH 

pH CD 

CD ■— • 

s ^ 

3 CD 
.SN 

t-9 



O 

03 
^3 

— — 

CD CD 

^PQ 
o 

pj 



4* 

E 



Ttf U5 <X 

CM CM CM 

C7i Ci CTi 



00 
CM 



CM 



CO 
CM 



CM 



CM 



00 Ci 
CM CM 



o 

CO 



o 

CO 



o 

CO 

Oi 



00 
CM 



CO 



CM 



CM CO ^t 

CO CO CO 

Ci Oi C7i 



CO 
CM 



CM 



O 
CO 



CO 



CM 



CO 
CO 



CM 



CJ 

O 



o 



o 



o 



CJ 

O 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



CJ 

o 



H 

X 
H 

D 

O 
en 

u 
O 

en 
O 

z 

H 

u 

H 

U 

2 

H 
en 



co 



> 

in 

2 
2 

UJ 

Pu 

bu 

O 

H 

y 

H 
m 



4) 
0) 



& * 

Sii 

O «5 

bfl"aJ 

^° 

C 
(0 



o 

*■> 
03 
i« 
4) 
no 
O 









W rj W 






03 



bO M CD 

S^ bo 
CD n •' H 

,r o3 <d 



^r2 

Ofq 



O CD 



CD 

C 

c 

*, 03 
feQ-g 

§ £ £ 



udJ dc^^ r-^d^ 



(D C fi 

rH g OS 
O rH O 



CO 0) CO 

<D rH rH 

C^«tH CD 

rH O Q) 



h 




r^T 


0) 

13 


CO 
CD 


> 

c 




cd 

o 




W 


• 




• 


W 



►> 






i- 


rH 


rH 


(0 


CD 


<D 


■M 


hC 


r£ 


0) 


be 


bit) 


3-i 


S3 


3 


0) 


a 


OS 


n 


PQ 


pq 






rH 

CD 

c 
c 

as 
P 

- 
as 

o 

w 



s 

c 

CD 
<£ 

pq 






cq 

CO 



rH 

rH 0) 
CDS 



CD 

• rH 

N 



Ul 



►4 



r^ 


a> 


<D 


• 1— 1 


CD 


r> 


U 


rH 


o 


• i— I 

as 


rC3 


fc 


M 

rH 
03 


0) 


£ 


£ 



>» 




CD 


CQ 


5h 


u 


«H 


C) 


T3 


l—l 


O 


CD 


O 


w 


• 


xA 


W 


• 



rH 
CD 

bO 

as 
PQ 

W 

W 



rH 
CD' 

c 

ft r- 

• o 



CQ 



o 



rC5 

o 

CQ 

bo 

c 

• I— ( 

rH 
ft 
Xfl 

CD 

0) 

PU 



rH 
<D 

rC 

b£ 

03 
PQ 

w 



rH 

CD 

S 

= 

• r- ( 
rH 

H 



a» 

bJO 

•i— i 
P^ 



rH 
CD 

A 
bt) 

03 
PQ 

W 



CQ 
^ CQ 

CD^ 

1o 

CD 



CD ^ 
ft * 
03^ 

?-< 



bo 

r7 
rO 

CQ 

c 

<D 

ft 

ft 



t/3 



4) 

E 



CO 



o 

oq 



00 
CO 






C7i 
CO 
Ci 



CM 



C 
C7i 



as 

<M 



C5 



&0 



CD 
O 



O 



CD 
O 



CD 



O 



CHAPTER IV 



THE BRETHREN'S HOME 

Southern District of Pennsylvania 

In 1892 the Middle District of Pennsylvania was divided 
into two districts; namely, Middle Pennsylvania and Southern 
Pennsylvania. At the first District Meeting of Southern 
Pennsylvania held in the Codorus Church in 1893, the ques- 
tion of having an "Old Folks Home" in the district was 
discussed but for want of more sentiment it was dropped for 
that time. 

In 1903 the Antietam Congregation petitioned District 
Meeting held at Black Rock that steps be taken in the matter 
of establishing a home. The petition was favorably received 
and a committee appointed to get information, draw plans, get 
approximate cost and report to next District Meeting. The 
committee was as follows : E. S. Miller, C. R. Oellig, and H. K. 
Miller. This committee reported to District Meeting in 1904, 
that about $7,000 was needed to purchase such a home and 
recommended that a property of about fifty acres would be 




Brethren's Home, Southern Pennsylvania 



* 2 S 

CD -, • 
> Sffi 




The Brethren's Home 



311 



suitable for the present time, that solicitors be appointed to 
visit the congregations and collect the needed funds, etc. 
Their report was accepted and Levi Mohler and E. S. Miller 
were named as solicitors. 

The locating committee — C. R. Oellig, Isaac Riddles- 
berger, and H. M. Stover— reported that Shippensburg or 
Carlisle would be the most suitable location. In 1907 Isaac 
Riddlesberger resigned from the committee and H. K. Miller 
was appointed in his stead. At this District Meeting in 1907 
it was decided that the committee should solicit, locate, and 
buy a place in Cumberland Valley for the home. This com- 
mittee reported to District Meeting held in the Mechanicsburg 
Church in 1908 that they had bought the Ames property near 
Huntsdale, Dickinson Township, Cumberland County, Pennsyl- 
vania, it being located along the Philadelphia and Reading 
Railroad about eight miles south of Carlisle. This property 
consists of three acres of land with a two-story brick dwelling 
house, containing eleven rooms, bath, etc., and a number of 
other buildings, for which they paid $3,000 cash. The 
committee also bought the adjoining farm of sixty-five acres 
for $3,000. 

The constitution and by-laws were presented and adopted 
at this District Meeting. The first board of directors consisted 
of C. C. Brown, J. J. Oiler, E. S. Miller, H. M. Stover, H. K. 
Miller, John Sprenkle. D. C. Burkholder and wife, Wealthy 
A., were the first steward and matron. The home was incor- 
porated under state laws in 
1908, and started with ten 
guests for first nine months. 
In 1910 an annex was built 
in order to relieve crowded 
conditions of the home. The 
home now contains twenty 
bed rooms, three bath rooms, 
kitchen, dining room, pan- 
try, two living rooms, a 
cellar and an attic. 

The home was formally 
dedicated on June 10, 1910. 
Elder I. N. H. Beahm; 
Brother Deardorff, of North 
Dakota, and Judge Saddler, 
of Cumberland County, 
addressed a large assembly. 

At the District Meeting 
of 1913 the board of direc- 
tors asked for an assessment 
of ten cents per member per 
year toward meeting the 
current expenses. The re- Wealthy Burkholder 




312 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

quest was granted. This decision was in effect for a few years 
and then dropped. Some years later the board of directors 
again asked for an assessment of twenty-five cents per 
member, which was granted. District Meeting decided that 
all churches that are more than two years in arrears with their 
assessments lose their right to represent by delegate at District 
Meeting. It was never enforced and in 1933 the board of 
directors petitioned District Meeting to abolish the assessment. 
Inasmuch as the home was always handicapped for want 
of electric current and hard surfaced road and the home being 
crowded, a movement was started to locate it at a more suit- 
able place. The District Meeting of 1927 held at Waynesboro 
directed the board of directors to purchase a lot in Carlisle. 
Some time later a special District Meeting was held at Carlisle, 
at which meeting plans and specifications were discussed and 
the following building committee elected : J. E. Trimmer, B. F. 
Leightner, A. S. Baugher, C. C. Brown, George K. Pfaltzgraff 
and D F Good. A home was to be erected at an estimated 
cost of $100,000.00. With lot paid and forty per cent of 
funds available, the financial depression hit the country and all 
plans relative to building a new home were dropped for the 

Dresent time. 

In 1917 the farm was offered for sale as it proved to be 
a liability rather than an asset and was sold for $3,000. 

The Old Folks Home proposition has been changed during 
the depression. In 1934 all the rooms at the home were not 
occupied. The District Meeting of 1935 authorized the board 
of directors to repair the heating and water systems with the 
view of staying at the same place for the present. 

The following are some of the stewards and matrons who 
served at the home : Burkholders, Trimmers, Millers Angles, 
Replogles,, Browns, Metzgars, Benners, Clappers, Watsons 
Frank Millers, Smiths, Mrs. Sallie B. Keeney, Harshmans and 
others. The present steward and matron are Emory 

Harshman and wife. 

The home grew up under financial struggle but the con- 
stituency rallied and supported it in a very commendable way. 
The rates vary but little between members and non-members. 
The rates are low, boarding is good and location is very 
healthful, yet there are not enough guests to run the home on 
a self-supporting basis. The overhead expenses are about the 
same with the home half filled as altogether filled. 

In 1919 the home received a safe from Brother and bister 
Isaac Miller, of East Berlin, as a donation. This is used in 
keeping important documents of the home. Quite a lew 
annuities were secured by the home and as the annuitants die 
the home receives the money. The different state pensions 
now in force also affect the attendance at the home. 

The district supporting the home consists of eight counties 
or parts of counties. The membership is 7,323. 



The Brethren's Home 



313 







Superintendent of Home and Associates 



Religious services are conducted every morning and 
preaching services every two weeks by the ministers of the 
several congregations in the district. Two Love Feasts are 
held annually at the home. As a rule these religious services 
are greatly appreciated by the guests of the home. 

A practice has been established in the district to make a 
contribution by each congregation to the home of anything 
that the home may use along the line of provisions, raiment, 
or money. This custom is commendable not only from a 
financial point of view but to keep that charitable and sympa- 
thetic spirit alive which is essential in the Christian life. The 
home could scarcely have pulled through the financial 
struggle were it not for the charitable spirit manifested by a 
goodly number of well to do donors of the district. 

Much credit for these annuities and donations belong to 
our present solicitor, L. H. Leiter and wife, whose untiring 
efforts have not ceased to induce many to give to this worthy 
cause. 

During the year of 1936 the home was improved by the 
spending of more than $2,000 in painting, papering and 
general repairing which makes the home sanitary, cozy, and 
home-like in appearance. 

Inasmuch as the home is now supported with current from 
line of Metropolitan Edison Company passing the home and 
a hard surfaced state road also passes same, there is no 
likelihood that the home will be changed to any other place. 






hs 




• 

C 








o 




+J 




* — 




o 




• F^ 


■* '. » ■ '■ 


P H 




o 




in 








3 




O 




Ph 




O 




d 




• 




• ■ 




c 




o> 




«« 73 




hH »S 








<J| fH 








K- 1 .--M 




x/i £* +> 




y4 <V"-< 
Hr "-I 5-1 






• Q 


£?:■£./ 


HERN 

H. L 

ance 




H .~+-> 




P >>X 




° b £ 










O 0) &H 




ffi^ s 




CO ^ 




V 5 ~ 




£5 ^ ° 






W as 1 "? 








M «2 g 




1^ 


1 


pq £^ 




u 




H j3 a> 




W in a 




03 <D> 




P ^ 




« H^r 




H ?H 








0)^3 




X 0) 




O £ 




ctf ••■* 


gi 


■S« 


■P 


« 


1 


Wm 


f 


£« 




di: 




.. o 




+3^ 




rC Q_) 




•f— < ""^ 




S* o 




o M 




^ ~ 




, *H 




13 bp 








W2 




DQ 




rt 



w 



The Brethren's Home 315 ; 

The home is now well cared for by annuities and 
donations secured from constituents of the Southern District. 

Hardly too much praise can be given to the donors and 
congregations of the district who were willing to make 
sacrifices in order that the home might exist. 

The home is now on a good financial basis and guests are 
paying only actual cost of maintainence or a little less as no 
consideration of depreciation of property is taken. 

The board has just finished installing a heating-plant at 
a cost of over $1,700 and when such needs arise we can easily 
see the need of donations, bequests and annuities to keep the 
home going. 



CHAPTER V 



THE CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY 

The trustees for the Children's Aid Society appointed bv 
the District Meeting of April 9, 1913, at the request of the 
Waynesboro Church, met at the home of Sister Sudie Wingert, 
May 20, 1913. The following organization was effected: 
President, M. A. Jacobs; secretary, Sudie Wingert; treasurer, 
Mrs. J. J. Oiler. 

It was decided to ask each Sunday school in the district 
for a free-will offering for the work and to ask each elder to 
appoint a committee of three to cooperate with the district 
committee in securing funds, finding dependent children, and 
suitable homes for them. The local committees to do no other 
work than organize until after the next District Meeting. 
A constitution and by-laws were drawn up to be submitted to 
the District Meeting of October 29th, 1913. 

The Constitution 

1. Name. This organization shall be known as 
the Children's Aid Society of the Church of 
the Brethren for the Southern District of 
Pennsylvania. 

2. Object. The object shall be to secure orphaned, 
dependent, neglected and homeless children 
regardless of church affiliation, and as soon as 
possible place them in suitable private homes 
until they become eighteen years of age. 

3. Membership. All active members of the church 
shall be considered members of the society. All 
others who assist and contribute shall be 
honorary members. 

4. Trustees. The executive power shall be vested 
in a board of three trustees elected by the dele- 
gates at District Meeting. The term of office 
shall be three years except those first elected 
who shall serve one, two, and three years 
respectively. 

5. Funds. The funds of the society for carrying on 
the work may be secured: (1) by public offer- 
ings at District Meeting; (2) by public offerings 
in local congregations; (3) by individual gifts, 
bequests and in other ways as may be desired. 



The Children's Aid Society 317 

6. Amendments. This constitution may be amended 
by a majority vote of the delegates at District 
Meeting. 

Duties of the Trustees 

1. Officers. The trustees shall organize by electing 
from their number, a president, a secretary, and 
a treasurer, each of whom shall serve for one 
year or until his successor is elected. 

a. The president shall call the meetings 
and shall preside over the same. 

b. The secretary shall keep a record of 
the meetings of the trustees, a record 
of the children received and cared 
for, shall receive all funds and 
receipt for the same and forward to 
the treasurer, and make an annual 
report to the District Meeting. 

c. The treasurer shall keep a record of 
all funds received and shall disburse 
them on approval of the president 
and secretary. 

2. Authority. The trustees shall have the authority 
to direct the work of the district and to assist 
local congregations in securing and placing 
children. 

3. Children. Any homeless, dependent and neg- 
lected child, sound in body and mind, by the con- 
sent of the trustees, may be placed in care and 
custody of the trustees, by legal surrender of 
said child by parents or guardian. 

4. Legal Forms. The trustees shall adopt legal 
forms of application and these properly executed 
forms shall become a part of the permanent 
records. 

This constitution and by-laws were adopted as submitted 
to District Meeting October, 1914. At this meeting the 
efficient secretary, Sister Sudie Wingert, was succeeded by 
Sister Frances M. Leiter (Mrs. L. H.). 

Meetings were called irregularly every few months. The 
churches responded liberally to requests for funds and local 
committees cooperated willingly. 

The first child was received from Waynesboro, in spring 
of 1914; the secretary sent postal cards over the district 
announcing the need of a home for her. She was finally 
placed in Greencastle. Another child was received and placed 
near Upton the same year. A picture of each child was filed 
with the record of history. 



318 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

A request was made to Elder's Meeting, 1916, for per- 
mission to hold a Child Rescue Meeting during Elder's 
Meeting. It was granted and this custom continued. Children 
needing homes were taken to these and other meetings of the 
district from time to time to secure homes for them. 

Up to 1917 the secretary cared for a number of children 
in her own home from a few days to five years, but there were 
always those who were sympathetic who shared the burden 
and our kindly disposed church people welcomed many of the 
children into their homes without thought of remuneration. 

As the number of children needing homes increased, the 
burden and responsibility became too heavy to secure 
temporary free homes, and since there was a small amount of 
money in the treasury, the trustees decided to pay for foster 




Shuman Family, Children's Aid Society 



home care for children under three years of age and for chil- 
dren who were not placeable in free homes. Many children 
from broken homes were cared for until better plans were 
made or their homes re-established. 

In 1921, a request was received by letter from Miss Mary 
Seylar, McConnelsburg, Pennsylvania, for care of seven little 
children whose mother had died and they were left destitute. 
After proper investigation it was found that they were in the 
bounds of Back Creek Congregation and the mother a member 
of the Church of the Brethren. A second letter said, 
"I thought the Brethren always took care of their old people 
and children. " Concluding it was our duty and privilege to 
care for the children immediately, the secretary, and her hus- 
band started early April 7, 1921, for the children who had 
been brought from Fort Littleton into McConnelsburg. Their 
father assigned them in writing to the society and a snapshot 
was taken of them. On the way home we stopped to ask a 
sister to help us care for one in her home and she immediately 



The Children's Aid Society 



319 



said she would take the girl. The secretary said, "but the 
baby must stay with the sister." Then she said she would 
take both and she did. Finally all seven were placed 
temporarily and several permanently. 

The story of this tragedy was told at District Meeting in 
1921 and a request was made that the district provide a 
receiving home for our children. Elder J. A. Long moved 
that the trustees bring something definite back to District 
Meeting the following year. His motion was unanimously 
supported. 

Late in the summer of 1922 a son in a family of twelve 
took typhoid fever. Both parents died, leaving nine children 
to be cared for. The oldest was able to make his own way. 
The secretary went to the home of Brother and Sister Maurice 
Kipp, near Newport, where, with the help of neighbors and 
Pastor John Harshman and his wife, arrangements were made 
for the temporary care. 

Several of them took the fever. By use of serum the 
others escaped the disease. This sad story was related to 
District Meeting, 1922, by those who were most intimately 
connected with it. The trustees at this time brought a request 
to this meeting to buy the property at 630 South Hanover 
Street, Carlisle, for $15,000. When the question was pre- 
sented to the delegates they stood as one man in favor of buy- 
ing the property. Again Elder J. A. Long moved that when 
the trustees had $10,000 in sight they might buy the 
property. This also had a unanimous vote in favor of the 
motion and several individuals and elders present pledged 
large sums from their churches for the purchase of the 
property. Immediately after the meeting the secretary, 
Frances M. Leiter, canvassed the district and in less than two 
weeks over eleven thousand dollars was promised by 




aq |wt a WwiW ttre < oe~<Kiw W tt»»^ 



Home of Children's Aid Society, Carlisle, Pa. 



320 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



individuals, Sunday school classes, Sisters Aid Societies, and 
churches. 

On November 14, 1922, the property was bought. L. H. 
Leiter and brother loaned the hand-money, five hundred 
dollars. The treasurer, Mrs. Mame Hollinger, and the secre- 
tary assisted by Sister Elizabeth Trimmer (Mrs. J. E. 
Trimmer) then began furnishing the home, using second-hand 
beds and many other pieces of used furniture. By April 9, 
1923, $10,316.64 of the pledged money was received. The 
pledges were practically all paid later. 

The home was dedicated on Ascension Day, 1923 ; Elder 
James M. Moore, pastor of the Waynesboro Church, making 
the main address. Dr. Ellen Potter, Secretary of Welfare, 
also spoke to a large assemblage. She deplored "another 
institution' ' but praised our foster-home plan, worked out by 
our Annual Conference general committee. 

The first guest in the home was from Falling Spring 
Congregation, placed that opening day by Elder David Y. 
Brillhart, near Spry, York County. 

The first matron, Mrs. Ada Benner, served less than a 
year. The treasurer and secretary took up the care of the 19 
children in the home for several weeks, assisted by "Aunt 
Alice Winand", until a substitute matron could be secured. 
The president secured Brother George Mikesell and wife, 

Anne, to take care of the 
home until Mrs. Mame Hol- 
linger could come. Later 
Miss Orpha Heefner sub- 
stituted as matron, followed 
by Mr. and Mrs. Ray Flory, 
all of Waynesboro. 

The two women mem- 
bers of the board sent a peti- 
tion to District Meeting ask- 
ing for two more members on 
the board. This was granted 
and Elder David Y. Brillhart 
and Sister Ida M. Lightner 
were elected October, 1924. 
The State Department 
of Welfare had advised a 
larger board, a full time 
paid worker to help carry on 
the investigations, place- 
ments, etc., and regular 
monthly meetings of the 
board. After Elder Brillhart 
Mame Hollinger Nell, was elected, board meetings 

Superintendent of Children's Home were held regularly the first 

1924-1929. Thursday oi each month. 




The Children's Aid Society 321 

The secretary then asked to be relieved of recording the 
minutes. Her request was granted, Sister Ida Lightner was 
elected recording secretary. The former secretary was 
designated field secretary. 

Elder H. M. Stover was president and Sister Mame H. 
Hollinger, treasurer, was elected superintendent of the home 
in 1925. 

In 1922 Brother William Neff, the day after that board 
meeting, stopped at the secretary's home and said, "What can 
our Sunday school class do for you in your work?" She 
replied, "Get me a typewriter." At the next board meeting 
the report is recorded on the minutes. Secretary reported 
that two classes in the Shippensburg Sunday School gave a 
Remington portable typewriter for the use of the secretary 
before the opening of the home. 

About this time we had fourteen children on our hands 
in temporary free homes. These fourteen were all placed be- 
fore the home was opened except one who was placed on 
opening day by Elder D. Y. Brillhart. 

May, 1923, having been instructed by District Meeting to 
have the society incorporated, application was made to 
Cumberland County Court on April 9, 1923. The charter was 
decreed May 22, 1923, by Honorable E. M. Biddle, P.J. 

In all these beginnings the constant help of Elder J. E. 
Trimmer cannot be overestimated. The kind home hospitality 
of both Brother Trimmer and his wife, Elizabeth, was like an 
oasis in a desert to those who were often overburdened with 
work and responsibility in establishing the new home where 
children were to be cared for in the future. 

Upon the request of the field secretary in 1923, $1.50 per 
day, which was the equivalent of what she paid her house- 
keeper, was allowed for time spent in the field. The 
superintendent received more, being on the job constantly in 
the home. 

The rate per mile for superintendent's car was reduced 
from 80 to 6*0. The field secretary used varied means of 
transportation, but her husband usually took her in his car. 
Later her husband gave her a car for her use for the C. A. S, 
Her expenses were paid by the society. 

Many improvements to the home were made. Having 
been incorporated we began to be recognized by the courts of 
the several counties in our district. When it seemed necessary, 
we secured a court commitment for some children. Annuity 
bonds were issued to those who desired to give a portion of 
their estate to the C. A. S. while living. The names of annu- 
itants are : Sister Emma Knepper, Waynesboro ; Sister Alice 
Winand, York Springs; Brother David and Sister Ella 
Heddings, York; Sister Amanda King, York; Sister Clara 
Morgal, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 



322 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

From the time the home was bought, we had to borrow 
from the bank every few months to keep going. In 1926 it 
was decided to write a letter to the elders of the district 
requesting them to make another effort to solicit their member- 
ship for money to pay the debt of the home, which was $2,680. 
The members of the board offered to help. 

It had been the dream of the field secretary and others to 
establish a fund from which a sufficient salary could be paid 
a full time secretary to make the investigations as well as 
keeping the records. The follow-up work or visitation of the 
children in their foster homes was a time consuming and 
expensive task, but it was not neglected. 

This hope began to be realized as confidence was estab- 
lished in the work and we received substantial bequests from 
time to time. At board meeting May 4, 1933, when the large 
bequest of Sister Emma Knepper was received, business was 
suspended while we thanked and praised God for her 
generous gift. The home was fully paid for with much 
beside. 

It was the opinion of the board as well as the advice of 
the State Bureau of Children that infants under three years 
of age could not be cared for adequately in the Children's 
Home among the older ones, hence private family homes were 
chosen for temporary boarding care. Where a foster mother 
kept more than one infant the home was licensed by the state. 
Usually there were a number of homes ready in which delicate 
children were received from time to time where they were 
nursed back to health. 

Each child's maintenance was assured before being 
received, but during the first years after the home was estab- 
lished a number of children were received into the home be- 
fore proper investigation could be made and as a result bills 
ammounting to several hundred dollars were never paid to 
the society. 

In 1926 permission was received from the Huntsdale 
Church to use their burying ground. Fortunately, it has never 
been needed. Only two children have died. These were 
cared for by their foster parents. Each year a reunion has 
been held to which foster parents, friends of the children, and 
friends in the district have been invited to come with their 
basket lunch. Varied programs were offered by the children 
and others with a special address for the occasion. Liberal 
offerings have been received. The children returning to the 
home for the day evidently enjoy the occasion. 

Each child has been given a Bible when he goes into his 
foster home. In it is written "From the Children's Aid 
Society" to "John Doe" and Numbers 6:24-26. The third 
hundred has been bought. 

August 20, 1930, the field secretary was returning from 
a three-day field trip in York County and met with a serious 







< 



- 
o 

w 
W 

H 
O 

£ 






324 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 




Mrs. L. H. Leiter, 

Executive Secretary of the Children's 

Aid Society. 



accident which resulted in 
wrecking her car and in 
almost the loss of her life. 
For eight months she was 
confined to her bed. The 
board did not accept her 
resignation. Brother M. E. 
Sollenbarger and his wife 
substituted during the re- 
mainder of the year 1930- 
1931, and Sister Anna 
Schwenk during 1932. 

Two members were 
added to the board, Sisters 
Mary Brillhart-Myers (Mrs. 
J. E.) and Sister Mary Haas 
Spangler. The latter was 
elected by the Carlisle 
Church as required. At this 
time the field secretary re- 
tired from the board to con- 
tinue the work of executive 
secretary. 

The Southern District of 
Pennsylvania had been pio- 
neering in child welfare work. Mifflin, Cumberland, Adams 
and Perry organized to care for their children. Hence few 
children are received from these counties in recent years 
Fulton remains unorganized. Seven of one family were 
received from the court of Fulton County in 1929 and were all 
placed within a year. 

The Children's Home has been a temporary shelter and 
clearing house. The objective has been a foster home for 
each normal child. The ideal of our Brotherhood, the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania, and the State Department 
of Welfare has been that. Next to the natural parents the 
foster parents are best for any child needing care. Sub-normal 
children are often better cared for in institutions. 

The work accomplished by the C. A. S. through the 
wholesome Christian homes in which the children were and 
are being reared could not have been done had not the kind 
hospitality been extended to our dependent, neglected chil- 
dren who come, many of them, from unchurched homes. 
Most of our adult wards have united with the Church of the 
Brethren and other Christian churches. 

Matrons who have cared for the children in the home not 
mentioned heretofore are: Sisters Arbutus and Ruth Wolf, 
Carlisle ; Sister Alice Swartz, Newville ; Sister Minnie Kline 
with her husband, Elder B. F. Kline, Gettysburg; Sister and 
Brother George Kraft, York ; and the present matron, Sister 




be 






3 



CO O 
^ CO 

•-$ 



' — ■ -*— * 
° ^ « 



X 

o 



>» ••> 



CO 

w 
h 

H 

00 

p 
- 

H 

fa 
o 

Q 

K 

<c 
o 

PQ 






CO 



- 1 »|-H 

CO 

> . 
CO 



M 





^ 


ffi 




• • 


fl 


+j 


a 




Q 


• l-H 




*H 


a> 




o 


o 


Fh 


-*J 


c 


<D 


o 

a 






•>■ 


1-9 


£ 




O 

- 


£ 


CO 


O 


?H 




•l-H 
fa 


T3 




o 




o 




0) 




w 



326 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 



■ . 




Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Newcomer, 
Superintendents of Home and Daughter, Josephine. 

Lottie Newcomer (Mrs. J. H. Newcomer), and daughter, 
Sister Josephine Newcomer, Mapleton, Maryland. 

A request from the board to District Meeting in 1940 for 
permission to build an addition to the home not to exceed 
$5,000 was granted. The building is now in progress. The 
population of the home April 1, 1941, was 38 — all Cumberland 
County wards except two. The Children's Aid Society has not 
had a placeable child in the home for six months. 

The present personnel of the board is : President, Elder 
H. M. Stover, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania; vice president, 
H. M. Snavely, Carlisle; secretary, Sister Verna Miller (Mrs. 
Henry Miller), Mechanicsburg; treasurer, Michael Markey, 
York; Sister Rhoda Kuhn (Mrs. Norman L.), Greencastle; 
J. M. Danner, East Berlin; M. E. Sollenberger, Waynesboro; 
executive secretary, Frances M. Leiter (Mrs. L. H.), 
Greencastle. 






CHAPTER VI 



THE MISSIONARY ACTIVITIES OF THE DISTRICT 

THE MISSION BOARD 

The Mission Board of the Southern District of Pennsyl- 
vania, Church of the Brethren, had its beginning at the time 
of the District Meeting in the year 1892. 

At that meeting the territory embraced within the bounds 
of the Middle District of Pennsylvania was divided into the 
Middle and Southern Districts of Pennsylvania. 

At that time a Mission Board was provided for the new 
district. The personnel of which is given as : Elders Jacob F. 
Oiler, C. L. Pfoutz, Andrew Bashore, Jacob Aldinger and 
Jacob Hollinger. „ ., 

Funds in the mission treasury ($26.78) were divided 
between the two districts. At the first District Meeting held 
in the Southern District of Pennsylvania, 1893, the minutes 
record Item #6: "An election was held for five brethren to 
compose the Mission Board which resulted in the election of 
J F Oiler and Albert Hollinger to serve three years ; Jacob 
Hollinger and C. L. Pfoutz to serve for two years ; and Andrew 
Bashore to serve one year." m 

There is evidence that J. F. Oiler was president and 
Jacob Hollinger treasurer of the board. Disbursements the 
first year amounted to $21.72. 

No record of specific work done in the earlier years is 
available. The treasurer's reports indicate that disbursements 
for 1894 were $33.60 and for 1895 $69.81. 

In 1898 Wm. A. Anthony did mission work in Fulton 
County which resulted in thirteen baptized, one reclaimed, and 
the building of a frame church, with very encouraging 
prospects for the future. . 

About this time, 1898, Elder J. A. Long, then president 
of the Mission Board, began a mission in Hanover, Pennsyl- 
vania, assisted by Ella Raff ensberger. Soon following there 
were five baptisms with a promising field. During this and 
the following year, with mission board and other funds con- 
tributed, a church was built in Hanover under supervision of 
the Mission Board at a cost of $211.56. Services were 
continued here by the Mission Board, Elder J. A. Long m 

After considerable effort on the part of the board, the 
several congregations adjacent to Hanover agreed to 



328 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

relinquish such territory as was essential to determine a 
boundary line. 

An organization was effected and the new organization 
was reported to District Meeting of 1902 for ratification and 
adoption. At time of organization there were twenty-eight 
members. A secretary and a treasurer were elected and Elder 
J. A. Long continued the oversight until 1904 when the 
Mission Board relinquished care. 

Hanover Congregation was not fully officered until 1906. 
In 1898 it was reported that Joseph Auker's River Mission 
(Perry County) has resulted in a number baptized and interest 
growing. 

At the District Meeting of 1899 an hour was given to the 
consideration of mission work. Short addresses were given 
by J. A. Long, S. F. Sanger, G. N. Falkenstein, Jacob Hollinger 
and others. An offering was lifted amounting to $28.00 for 
mission work. 

In 1900 the Mission Board applied for incorporation 
papers and a charter was secured. According to the charter 
the location of the said corporation and the chief place for the 
transaction of its business shall be in the City of York, in the 
County of York, and the State of Pennsylvania. The names 
of the incorporators are recorded as follows, Joseph A. Long, 
William A. Anthony, C. L. Pfoutz, Jacob Hollinger, Henry 
Beelman. 

Mission work had been done at New Buffalo, Perry 
County and in 1900 a church was bought. Services were 
maintained here jointly by the Mission Board and the Lower 
Cumberland Congregation. Wm. A. Anthony, and Wm. H. 
Miller rendered service for the board, the former in occasional 
revival meetings, the latter in a pastoral capacity. 

Though much labor through the years was given to this 
place little numerical progress was made and interest 
lagged. 

In December, 1913, the Mission Board decided to dis- 
mantle the church and convey the materials to a lot donated 
for a church situated three miles north of Newport and one 
mile from the Juniata River. At this point services had been 
held for some years in a school house variously designated as 
River Mission, Union, and Newport Mission. 

This project was carried out during 1914 and on January 
3, 1915, the church house was dedicated. Elder Joseph A. 
Long, of York, president of the Mission Board, preached the 
dedicatory sermon, and by unanimous consent the name 
Mount Olivet was adopted. 

November 4, 1916, Elders J. A. Long and C. L. Baker 
effected an organization of the Mount Olivet Mission. Two 
deacons were elected and other officers. Elder C. L. Baker 
was given the oversight. (For further information see History 
of Mount Olivet.) 



The Missionary Activities of the District 329 

The three congregations — Falling Spring, Back Creek and 
Ridge — converging in the City of Chambersburg, were asked 
to grant to the Mission Board the privilege of working in the 
city as their discretion might dictate. 

November 25, 1907, the board convened in Chambersburg 
in the home of Emory P. Trimmer. 

At this meeting the board recommended that members 
living in and about Chambersburg hold meetings once a week 
in suitable and available homes and when no minister is 
present conduct prayer services until the Mission Board can 
provide a place of worship. 

William A. Anthony was appointed to take charge of the 
mission project. Through the very zealous efforts of Emory 
P. Trimmer who at that time resided in Chambersburg, the 
members in the city were located and inspired to fall in line 
with the instructions of the Mission Board. 

To this there was a very hearty response. Church senti- 
ment began growing, funds for a church building were soon 
being solicited and within a year the church was erected. 

The board had the general supervision and at a meeting 
November 28, 1908, the building was inspected and accepted, 
the contract agreement with Abram Thomas closed and the 
building committee excused with thanks. Cost, $4,631.68. 
The church was dedicated November 29, 1908. Elder A. B. L. 
Martin preached the dedicatory sermon. 

The church was organized June 4, 1910, and approved 
by District Meeting in 1911. The board's oversight has 
terminated. Much commendation is due to Elder W. A. 
Anthony for his energy and faithfulness in the work carried 
out as given above. 

Mission work in Carlisle was taken up and maintained 
for a time by the rural congregations whose boundaries 
extended equidistant into the city. July 22, 1911, at a joint 
meeting of the Mission Board and the Upper and Lower 
Cumberland Congregations, the building of a church house in 
Carlisle was given serious consideration. A tentative under- 
standing was agreed upon as to what proportion of the 
expense of building would be assumed by these congregations 
and the Missions Board. 

Later the congregations accorded to the Mission Board 
such areas of their territory as necessary to establish a 
boundary line for Carlisle. A jointly owned building lot was 
also turned over to the board. However, in the spring of 1912 
unfortunate conditions existing in Carlisle the Mission Board 
was called to intervene and "unravel the perplexing problem". 
This resulted in a request to District Meeting to send a com- 
mittee of brethren to form a congregation of the Carlisle 
Mission "as the only remedy for the ills existing". The District 
Meeting, acting accordingly, appointing Elders C. R. Oellig, 
E. S. Miller and Peter Lehman with instructions, as soon as in 



330 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

their judgment sufficient harmony exists to organize Carlisle 
Mission into a separate congregation. 

Upon a second attempt to carry out their instructions the 
committee met January 23, 1913; the elders of Lower and 
Upper Cumberland Congregations were present. A boundary 
line was agreed upon, as within a radius of three miles of the 
court house. Sentiment determined not to organize until 
after a church is built. 

June, 1913, Elder J. A. Long, president of the Mission 
Board was given the oversight of the Carlisle Mission. The 
Mission Board presently recommended the building of a 
"modern and convenient house of worship at a probable cost 
of six thousand dollars". Elders J. A. Long and C. R. Oellig 
shall provide building plans and present them to next board 
meeting. Plans submitted did not meet with general approval 
and the building project was further delayed. In September, 
1913, the board decided to erect a brick structure with a 
Sunday school annex and a basement. 

An architect was employed who submitted plans and 
specifications which were eventually approved and accepted. 
A building committee was selected, composed of three 
members, J. E. Trimmer, Daniel Shank, and Edward Roth. 
The building contract was awarded Mr. H. A. Lackey at 
$6,081.65, including bill of extras. It should be stated that 
the Carlisle church project received the approval of District 
Meeting. 

Elders of the district were requested by the board to have 
their membership solicited for funds to meet building costs. 
The building, furnishings and equipment were finally com- 
pleted and the structure was formally dedicated to the worship 
of God September 6, 1914. Elder I. N. H. Beahm preached 
the dedicatory sermon. Carlisle continued under the over- 
sight of the Mission Board. 

Mission Board and Perry Congregation 

In the year 1909 at the earnest request of Elder Edmond 
Book, who was in his declining years, the Mission Board took 
under its care that area of Perry Congregation situated in 
Juniata County designated Farmer's Grove. Members of the 
Mission Board did the preaching here for about a year. 
B. F. Lightner was then employed to labor in this field, which 
he did from July 1, 1910, to January 1, 1913. Brother 
Lightner reported good interest and an organized Sunday 
school and Christian Workers meeting. 

The board provided ministers to maintain the preaching 
services at Farmer's Grove until September 30, 1916, when it 
was formally returned to Perry where it had belonged 
originally. Through these seven years Henry Beelman, 



The Missionary Activities of the District 331 



D. A. Foust, and C. R. Oellig, of the Mission Board, served 
successively in caring for this point. March 28, 1916, Perry 
Congregation asked for assistance that they might have more 
preaching services. The board agreed to provide some 
ministerial aid and to help bear the expense incurred. 

This help continued until September 30, 1916, when the 
Mission Board placed Elder Charles H. Steerman as pastor of 
Perry Congregation. He so continued to serve until April 1st, 
1923. Trostle P. Dick then became pastor under the Mission 
Board and continued his pastorate until October, 1928. 
November 1, 1928, Elder C. H. Steerman again became pastor 
of Perry, the congregation to bear one-half of the pastoral 
support. 

In 1934 the Mission Board sponsored evangelistic meet- 
ings in Perry Congregation. Secretary of the board, M. A. 
Jacobs, did the preaching — resulting in twenty baptisms at 
the Three Springs house and twenty-one at Farmer's Grove. 
Elder C. H. Steerman continued his pastorate until October, 
1936. 

Robert L. Cocklin became pastor of Perry Congregation 
December 1, 1936, the Mission Board continuing to meet one- 
half of the pastoral support. Brother Cocklin continued in the 
pastorate until 1941. 

Through the years revival meetings at Farmer's Grove, 
sponsored by the Mission Board, were conducted by D. K. 
Clapper, J. E. Rowland, M. A. Jacobs, Robert Cocklin and 
probably others. Elder S. C. Godfrey, a member of the board, 
has the oversight of Perry at the present time. 

Van Dyke Mission 

The work at Van Dyke, which developed into the mission, 
began as a community Sunday school, sponsored by the State 
Sabbath School Association, previous to 1933. Interest grew 
and in 1933 evangelistic meetings were planned. Robert L. 
Ditmer, who was connected with the school, was selected to 
conduct an evangelistic meeting. Much interest was mani- 
fested and at the conclusion of the meeting the number of 
decisions totaled about thirty. 

When it came to choosing church affiliations much the 
greater number of converts decided for membership in the 
Church of the Brethren. Others, we trust, found a church 
home elsewhere. From this time on Brother Ditmer super- 
intended the Sunday school and held regular weekly preaching- 
services and mid-week prayer meetings. 

The next year Van Dyke requested the Mission Board to 
sponsor a revival meeting. As Van Dyke is within the bounds 
of Lost Creek Congregation the elder was consulted and there 
followed an agreement to share with the mission in the 
expense of a meeting. 



332 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Lost Creek Congregation, by action of their council 
September 2, 1935, petitioned the Mission Board of Southern 
Pennsylvania to care for the spiritual needs of Van Dyke. 
The board assumed this care. Meetings from the beginning 
were held in the public school building in Van Dyke which, 
while commodious for school purposes, was not so convenient 
for church services, especially for communion occasions, but 
inconveniences and obstacles were either surmounted or 
endured and the work went on. 

A move for a church house was considered and a three 
acre lot was purchased from the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company. Some soliciting was done and more followed, but 
repeated calls to the congregations have met with meager 
response. Blue prints for a church are in the hands of a build- 
ing committee, and as to "counting the cost" the Mission Board 
has determined that when contributions reach $1,500.00 in 
cash the erection of a house of worship will go forward. 

The Mission Board, January 2, 1937, agreed to give Van 
Dyke official recognition and appointed the president of the 
Board, Elder C. R. Oellig, to effect an organization. Accord- 
ingly Elder H. M. Stover and C. R. Oellig on April 18, 1937, 
met with and organ- 
ized the mission. 

A deacon and 
wife were elected, 
also secretary and 
treasurer. Brother 
Robert L. Ditmer con- 
tinued as pastor, the 
Mission Board in 
charge. With ardent 
zeal for saving lost 
souls, Brother Ditmer 
with great personal 
sacrifice has toiled on 
until now, supple- 
menting his faithful 
ministry with oc- 
casional evangelistic 
meetings conducted 
by himself and other 
ministers. 

The work at 
Van Dyke is an en- 
couraging success 
and deserves a house 
of worship. Great 
credit on the part of 

the Mission Board Robert L. Ditmer, 

and all Southern Dis- Pastor Van Dyke Mission. 




The Missionary Activities of the District 333 

trict of Pennsylvania is gratefully due the school board for per- 
mitting the use of the fine school building at Van Dyke and in 
addition without cost for heat and light. 

This would indicate that the school board regards religion 
as a vital part of education and a valuable factor in com- 
munity uplift. Brother Ditmer, who is quick to observe and to 
make the best of an opportunity, started a Sunday school at 
Olive Branch, situated three miles east of Port Royal and some 
miles west of Van Dyke. This work prospered and in about 
one year from its beginning Brother Ditmer held a two weeks 
meeting with remarkable interest and very encouraging 
results. Toward the close of the second week of the meeting 
the evangelist called for help and Elder Stover and wife 
arrived at the place of meeting on Saturday. He found 18 
applicants for baptism. These were duly instructed by Elder 
Stover Sunday morning, March 17, 1940. In the afternoon the 
applicants were conveyed to Lewistown and baptized in the 
baptistry of the church. 

Pastoral Aid 

The transition from a gratuitous to a supported or 
salaried ministry found some churches in the district unpre- 
pared to meet it. A number of churches appealed to the 
Missions Board for pastoral aid. Such aid was given with 
careful consideration and the number of churches asking 
grew in number until curtailment became necessary. Aside 
from mission points only one congregation is receiving 
pastoral aid at present. 

Some mention should be made of brethren who served in 
the district for the Mission Board in various capacities. As 
evangelists and field workers Wm. A. Anthony, Wm. H. 
Miller, C. H. Steerman, Trostle P. Dick, M. A. Jacobs, J. E. 
Rowland, S. C. Godfrey, J. A. Buffenmyer, Elder I. N. H. 
Beahm as solicitor, visited the congregations in the interests of 
mission work in the district with a good degree of success 
financially. 

John R. Hershman and Earl S. Kipp have bestowed much 
arduous ministerial and pastoral labor at Mount Olivet. The 
former serving part or full time from 1926 until the present. 

Many ministers of the district cooperated finely with the 
Mission Board in filling appointments for services. Many 
thousands of miles were traveled in all weathers and all 
conditions of roads. 

The faithful service of some men who served on the 
Mission Board were outstanding and possibly will receive 
biographical mention elsewhere. 

Past and present members of the Mission Board elected 
by District Meeting : 



334 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

1892 — Jacob F. Oiler, Albert Hollinger, C. L. Pfoutz, 
Andrew Bashore, Jacob Aldinger. 

1893 — J. F. Oiler and Albert Hollinger to serve three 
years. Jacob Hollinger, C. L. Pfoutz, two years; Andrew 
Bashore for one year. 

1894 — John H. Smith for three years. 

1895 — Jacob Hollinger, C. L. Pfoutz. 

1896 — Joseph A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1897 — Henry Beelman. 

1898 — Jacob Hollinger, C. L. Pfoutz. 

1899 — J. A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1900 — Henry Beelman. 

1901 — M. Stouffer, C. L. Baker. 

1902 — J. A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1903 — Henry Beelman. 

1904 — C. L. Baker, S. M. Stouffer. 

1905 — J. A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1906 — Henry Beelman. 

1907 — C. L. Baker, S. M. Stouffer. 

1908 — J. A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1909 — Henry Beelman, D. A. Foust. 

1910 — C. L. Baker. 

1911 — J. A. Long, Wm. A. Anthony. 

1912 — D. A. Foust, C. R. Oellig, M. A. Jacobs to fill 
unexpired term of Wm. A. Anthony, deceased. 

1913 — c. L. Baker. 

1913 — October 29, J. A. Long, M. A. Jacobs. 

1914 — c. R. Oellig, D. A. Foust. 

1915 — c. L. Baker. 

1916 — J. A. Long, M. A. Jacobs. 

1917 — c. R. Oellig, D. A. Foust. 

1918 — C. L. Baker. 

1919 — j. A. Long, M. A. Jacobs. 

1920— C. R. Oellig, D. A. Foust. 

1921 — C. L. Baker. 

1922 — M. A. Jacobs, Jno. H. Keller. 

1923 — C. R. Oellig, D. A. Foust. 

1924 — C. L. Baker. 

1925 — J. H. Keller, M. A. Jacobs. 

1926 — C. R. Oellig, J. E. Trimmer. 

1927 — C. L. Baker. 

1928 — M. A. Jacobs, J. L. Myers. 

1929 — J. E. Trimmer, C. R. Oellig, S. C. Godfrey, two 
years. 

1930 — C. L. Baker. 

1931 — M. A. Jacobs, S. C. Godfrey. 

1932 — C. R. Oellig, J. E. Trimmer. 

1933 — c. L. Baker. 

1934_S. C. Godfrey, H. M. Stover. 



The Missionary Activities of the District 



335 



1935—C. R. Oellig, J. E. Trimmer, N. S. Sellers 
(unexpired term of C. L. Baker, deceased). 

1936 — L. Elmer Leas. 

1937— S. C. Godfrey, H. M. Stover. 

1938— J. E. Trimmer, C. R. Oellig. 

1939 — L. Elmer Leas. 

1940— S. C. Godfrey, H. M. Snavely. 

In all twenty-one individuals have served on the Mission 
Board. 

Presidents of the District Mission Board 

Elder Jacob F. Oiler 1892-1896 

Elder Joseph A. Long 1896-1922 

Elder Charles L. Baker 1922-1935 

Elder C. Rush Oellig 1935- 

Secretaries 

Wm. A. Anthony 1896-1911 

Charles L. Baker 1911-1914 

M. A. Jacobs 1914-1934 

S. C. Godfrey 1935-1940 

H. M. Snavely 1941- 




Mission Board 

Left to right: S. C. Godfrey, Treasurer; H. M. Snavely, Secretary; 
C. R. Oellig, President; J. E. Trimmer, L. Elmer Leas. 



336 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Treasurers 

C. L. Pfoutz 1896-1900 

Henry Beelman 1901-1912 

C. Rush Oellig 1912-1934 

H. M. Stover 1935-1940 

S. C. Godfrey 1941- 

The personnel of the Mission Board now is: President, 
Elder C. Rush Oellig; secretary, Harper M. Snavely; treasurer, 
S. C. Godfrey; J. E. Trimmer, L. Elmer Leas, Elder H. Mitchell 
Stover, solicitor. 



CHAPTER VII 



OUR MISSIONARY READING CIRCLE 



Through the inspiration of Wilbur B. Stover, our pioneer 
missionary to foreign lands, a Missionary Reading Circle was 
organized in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, for the benefit of our 

local group. Because of the 
interest manifested by this 
group Brother Stover con- 
ceived the idea of extending 
the Circle throughout the 
brotherhood. "For this pur- 
pose the following organiza- 
tion was formed in 1893 : 
President, W. B. Stover, 
Edgemont, Maryland ; Vice 
Presidents, Mrs. H. M. 
Stover, Waynesboro, Penn- 
sylvania ; H. M. Barwick, 
West Alexandria, Ohio ; E, 
B. HofF, Lamars, Iowa ; Sec- 
retary, Edith R. Newcomer, 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania ; 
Treasurer, Chalice W. 
Baker, Waynesboro, Penn- 
sylvania ; Librarian, James 
M. Neff, Covington, Ohio." 
(Missionary Visitor, March, 
1906.) 

To advertise the Circle 
the following item was inserted in the Gospel Messenger, 
November 14, 1893 : 

The Missionary Reading Circle is a project set on foot by 
a number of brethren and sisters who are deeply interested in 
enlarged missionary efforts. The object is to disseminate 
among our people a more general knowledge of the work of 
missions — the fields, methods of work, needs, etc., by a three 
years' course of reading. The course consists in reading such 
books as will give the needed information. A full knowledge 
of the work can be had by addressing the secretary, Edith R. 
Newcomer, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

The following are copies of letters sent by the secretary 
to individuals : 




Wilbur B. Stover 



338 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Our Missionary Reading Circle, John 3:16 

Very many of our dear people, both young and old are 
quite desirous of having a more satisfactory knowledge con- 
cerning the great work of missions. The peoples, the fields, 
the methods, the needs, the workers, the opportunities, the 
costs, the results; these, and many more particulars of 
missions, are of vast interest to every Christian. In all the 
churches will come increased liberality, deeper devotion, 
greater consecration, and a quicker pulse-beat of thirst for 
souls as soon as the members are better informed on missionary 
operations. 

There is untold pleasure experienced by the converted 
soul in reading truth which is stranger than fiction, and in 
realizing how God again and again verifies His Presence in the 
lives of His most humble followers. 

Our Missionary Reading Circle aims to supply, in part at 
least, this much felt want. The Circle has but one object, and 
that object is the dissemination of missionary information. 
The purpose is that as many as possible may know about 
missions. A three years course of reading has been arranged, 
four books to be read each year. The first three books of each 
year will be purely missionary, while the other will be of 
rather a devotional nature. There is neither thought nor 
desire that all who take up this work shall become mis- 
sionaries, but it is the burden of prayer that not one such may 
fail to partake of the missionary spirit. 

The Home Helper, the organ of the Circle, is given the 
first year free to each member; after that members will 
subscribe. 

The Circle has arranged with the librarian to furnish the 
course books to members at special low rates. 

The books may be read faster or slower according to 
one's own time. A certificate will be issued to all who 
complete the course. 

There will be no examinations. Members will twice a 
year report progress to the secretary. 

You become a member of the Circle by filling out the 
promise card below, detaching it and forwarding with 
entrance fee to the secretary. 

You become an honorary member by changing "pursue" 
to "read two books of". Also "20^ to $1.00" and filling out 
as indicated. 

Promise Card 

189___ 

It is my purpose to pursue the Missionary Course of read- 
ing. I will make an honest effort to get at least one other 
person to take up this work. 



Our Missionary Reading Circle 



339 



Enclosed find my entrance fee (20<£), to help pay the 
running of the Circle. 

Name 

Address 



* * 






Letter in possession of J. R. Snyder, of Tyrone, 
Pennsylvania : 

Our Missionary Reading Circle 

Home of the Secretary 

Waynesboro, Pa., 189 — 

My Dear Christian Friend : 

Your "Promise Card" has been received by me, and I am 
very glad to enroll you among our many missionary readers. 
We believe it is a work that will be productive of great good. 
You will find the books exceedingly interesting. 

Please report to me your progress in reading, once a year 
as near as possible on March 1st. By doing so you will greatly 
assist me in my work as secretary. 

Enclosed is a circular. I hope you will be instrumental 
in getting others to take up 
this course of reading. If you 
need more circulars, write 
me. For any other informa- 
tion, enclose stamp. 

May the Lord abun- 
dantly bless you and yours. 
Edith R. Newcomer, 

Secretary. 

P.S. — Your Circle Num- 
ber is Please 

mention it in reporting to 
me, or in ordering your 
books from the Brethren 
Publishing House, Mount ^* 
Morris, Illinois. 




* 



'i- 



The list of books for the 
three years as given in 
Brethren Family Almanac of 
1897 was: 

First year — "Crisis of 
Missions" (Pierson), "Life of 
Adoniram Judson", "Our 
Country" (Strong), "Non 




Edith R. Newcomer, 

(Mrs. W. M. Howe), First Secretary 
of Our Missionary Reading Circle. 



340 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Such Professor"; second year — "Miracles of Missions" 
(Pierson), "Memoirs of Robert Moffat", "Cannibals of New 
Guinea", "The Seven Laws of Teaching" ; third year — "Divine 
Enterprise of Missions" (Pierson), "Life of Robert Morrison", 
"Do Not Say", and "Acts of Apostles, Ch. 13-28", "In the 
Volume of the Book". 

Wilbur Stover was president of the organization through- 
out its existence. After he had 
been in India several years 
John R. Snyder, of Belle- 
fontaine, Ohio, was made act- 
ing president. Brother Snyder's 
work with the Circle dated 
from 1893 when he assisted the 
librarian, James Neff, in filling 
book orders and editing the 
Reading Circle page in the 
Home Helper, the official 
organ of the Circle. In 1895 
Brother Neff sold the Home 
Helper to the Brethren Publish- 
ing House at Mount Morris, 
Illinois, and Brother Snyder 
went with Brother Neff to 
Mount Morris and continued 
his work in the Reading Circle 
department of the Gospel Mes- 
senger under the supervision 
of the General Mission Board. 
The secretarial office of the 
Circle was in Waynesboro until 
the secretary married W. M. 
Howe in the fall of 1898 and 
left this community. The fol- 
lowing year the Circle was 
reorganized. 

A special committee made 
this report to the General 
Mission Board in 1899 on the 
management of the Missionary Reading Circle: 

"That, Inasmuch as the Publishing Department, four 
years ago, purchased the 'Home Helper', the official organ of 
the Circle, and has since handled its publication, we recom- 
mend that the General Mission Board appoint and cause to be 
perpetuated a committee whose duties shall be as follows: 

"a. To organize themselves so as to make the 
officers of the said circle. 

"b. To plan and push the Circle work in the 
interests of the Church of the Brethren. 




John R. Snyder, 

Bellfontaine, Ohio, President of 

Reading Circle 1899. 



Our Missionary Reading Circle 



341 



"c. To revise and enlarge the work as thought best. 

"d. To confer with and report to the General 
Mission Board at least once a year. 

"The committee elected was Mrs. Elizabeth D. 
Rosenberger, three years; Otho Winger, two years; John R. 
Snyder, one year." (From Thirty-three Years of Missions in 
Church of the Brethren — Galen B. Royer.) 

At a meeting held at 
Brother Snyder's home in 
October, 1899, the following 
organization was formed : 

President — John R. 
Snyder, Bellefontaine, Ohio. 

Vice-President — Otho 
Winger, Indiana. 

Secretary - Treasurer — 
Mrs. Elizabeth D. Rosen- 
berger, Covington, Ohio. 

"This organization con- 
tinued until January 1, 1906, 
when the Circle was discon- 
tinued by action of the 
Mission Board, who felt that 
'the introduction of the 
Christian Workers' Move- 
ment in the church had 
absorbed the energies of the 
active young people'. " 
(Thirty-three Years of Mis- 
sions, P. 243.) 

After the reorganiza- 
tion in 1899 four courses of 
reading of two years each 
were offered as follows : 
Missionary, Young People's, 
Advanced or Ministerial. 




Mrs. Elizabeth D. Rosenberger, 

Covington, Ohio, Secretary of 

Missionary Reading Circle. 

Sunday School Workers', 



Missionary Course 

First Year : 

1. "Introduction to Study of Foreign Missions. ,, 

2. "Modern Apostles of Missionary By-ways". 

3. "Dawn on the Hills of Tang". 

4. "In the Tiger Jungle". 
Second Year: 

1. "The Evangelization of the World in This 

Generation." 

2. "Knights of Labarum" — Missionary Biographies. 

3. "Protestant Missions in South America". 



342 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

4. "The Call, Qualifications and Preparation of 
Missionary Candidates". 



Young People's Course 

Thirst "Year * 

1. "What is Worth While ?"— Anna R. Brown. 

2. "Black Rock" — Ralph Connor. 

3. "Ourselves and Others" — H. Clay Trumbell. 

4. "Remember Jesus Christ" — Robert E. Speer. 
Second Year: 

1. "Character, the Grandest Thing in the World" 

Orison Sweet Marden. 

2. "Lectures on Ruth" — M. G. Brumbaugh. 

3. "Laddie". 

4. "Making a Life" — Cortland Myers. 



Elective Course 

1. "Life's Everydayness" (for girls) — Rose Porter. 

2. "Before He is Twenty" (for boys) — Edward 

Bok. 

3. "Investment of Influence" — Newell Dwight 

Hillis. 

4. "On the Indian Trail" — Egerton R. Young. 



Sunday School Workers' Course 

1. "Sunday School Success" — Amos R. Wells. 

2. "The Teacher, the Child, and the Book" — Dr. 

A F Shauffler. 

3. "Object Lessons for Children" — C. H. Tyndall. 

4. "Topical Text Book"— R. A. Torrey. 



Advanced Course 

First Year: 

1. "History of Reformation" — Fisher. 

2. "Handbook of Comparative Religions" — S. H. 

Kellogg. 

3. "Evangelistic Work in Principle and Practice' 

Pierson. 

4. "Seven Churches of Asia" — D. L. Miller. 

Second Year: 

1. "Christian Ethics, General" — Martensen. 

2. "Doctrine of Brethren Defended" — R. H. Miller. 

3. "Notes from My Bible" — D. L. Moody. 

4. "Bulwark of the Faith" — James M. Gray. 



99 



Our Missionary Reading Circle 



343 



* 


m 


• I~ 






* 




X 




^ 




IV 






* 






b 




k 


-- 


3 




E 


4 

a 


o 


6 

E 




= 




>■ 


o 


r 










•c- 
o 


3 


h 
e 


•a 


* t* 

e 


•r 


o 






Q 














s 




* — 


t? 


»» 






3 




-o 


• 




«« 






4j 


C 


P 




» 


B 


o 




O 


o 


i 


3 


1 


S 


11 








-Q 


■Q 








"O 


I- 






E 


■ r 




-*m 














:: 



WW, W H K M - ^ 

- < *" 2 H •- ^ 

5 > 






T7 








"»' 


A 








• 1 


tr 


P« IF u» 

ti w tr 


tux 

10 




> 

>< 






< — 






tg 


10 ;-m; tr 




<* 




5 


£ g" tc 


nr 


K) 


1- 

< 




tf v cr 


tr 


^ 


?« 








»* 



o 

B 

to 






U Id \, kl * 



C=3 




u o 



z 

Q 
< 
id 
05 

u- 
O 

CO 

04 

■~> 

C 

u 

a 
w 

PQ 

5 

U 
1/3 

U 

CU 
DJ 

H 

O 

z 

H 

uj 
►J 

O 
U 

04 
O 




t^ 


•-. 


i. 


t 


C 


2 


'-0 


te 


to 


o 


ft! 


UJ 


ti. 


"-> 




o 

I 

z 
a 

Ml 

k- 

2 



X 






*• 


13 

-3 


3 




\r\ 








> 


_2> 


I 


% 

.5' 


Mi 

K 

U 










*S- 


v>» 


^>. 


(O 


J 




> 
3' 


< 

as 



CO 

u 

o 

o 

tn 

H 

G 

a 

E- 

3 

o 

u 

c 



w 

DO 

o 
K 
Eh 

O 

H 

z 
o 



H 
OS 
W 

o 
o 



344 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

In 1904 "three courses, all on missions" were offered : 
Christian Workers, General and Advanced. (Missionary 
Visitor. ) 

Each year new books were suggested for those who had 
read the course books. Those suggested in 1903 and 1904 
were — "India, a Problem", by Stover; "The Price of Africa", 
Taylor; "The Story of John G. Paton", "Effective Workers in 
Needy Fields". (Missionary Visitor.) 

The work of the Circle was kept before the people by the 
secretary through the church periodicals, where-in the names 
of all new members, together with their Circle numbers were 
recorded. The last of these to which I have access is the 
Missionary Visitor of November, 1904, when the number was 
2,550. This was fourteen months before the Circle work was 
discontinued. The secretary also gave on these pages news 
of the work in the different circles and reports of the inspira- 
tional meetings of the Circle held at our Annual Conferences. 

Upon the completion of the course a neat certificate 
printed in India with the signatures of the president (W. B. 
Stover) and secretary was given to the reader. On this certifi- 
cate were printed Scripture verses in English, Greek, Hebrew, 
Arabic, Marathi, and Gunerathi. "These tokens were much 
prized by those who received them." (See page 343.) 

The Reading Circle had a far reaching influence on the 
spiritual life of our young people. As they met in local groups 
to discuss the books a desire arose to discuss other religious 
topics. To assist them in this the secretary, Mrs. Rosenberger, 
published, in the church periodicals weekly topics and 
programs. "The Christian Workers' meetings were an 
out-growth of these meetings." 

"Because of apparent need," the Annual Conference of 
1903 provided the organization of Young People's meetings 
throughout the Brotherhood under the name of Christian 
Workers' Meetings and also decided that the Brethren 
Publishing House should publish a suitable list of topics for 
such meetings and that "comments and helps be published in 
one or more publications of the House". (Missionary Visitor, 
February, 1904, p. 81.) In compliance with this decision the 
secretary of our Reading Circle continued editing in the 
Missionary Visitor the page of weekly programs with com- 
ments and helps, the title being changed (March, 1904) to 
"Reading Circle and Christian Workers' Topics". In 1905 
they were given by her in the Inglenook. (January, 1905. 
Back cover, Missionary Visitor.) At the end of that year the 
Reading Circle was discontinued and the page of comments 
and helps for Christian Workers' Topics was transferred to 
the Young People. 

Following the request of Brother W. B. Stover in 1903 
several of the Circles assumed the support of one or more 
famine orphans in India. The Uniontown, Pennsylvania, 



Our Missionary Reading Circle 345 

Circle was the first to respond to this call. (Missionary Visitor, 
April, 1903.) 

The estimated value and influence of the Reading Circle is 
given in a few testimonials which I have taken from Missionary 
Visitors. 

November, 1902 — "One summer Jesse B. Emmert gave up 
the opportunity of making good wages at his trade to go with 
three other boys talking missions and deeper spiritual life and 
organizing Missionary Reading Circles." — C. C. Ellis. 

November, 1902 — "The Missionary Reading Circle was 
the means by which Brother D. J. Lichty's interest was 
aroused in foreign missions — a movement which began to 
really stir our church about the time of his conversion." — 
W. L. Ikenberry. 

December, 1902 — "Brother Lichty (D. J.) when talking 
to students (at Mount Morris College) laid stress upon the 
work of the Missionary Reading Circle, that it is doing more to 
create a lasting missionary sentiment than any other organ of 
the Brethren Church. " — A. W. Ross. 

May, 1904 — "The Missionary Reading Circle deserves the 
credit for directly or indirectly causing a great share of the 
missionary inspiration found today in our church." — 
Georgiana Hoke. 

September, 1904 — "I believe I am safe in saying that with 
one exception all the foreign missionaries of our church have 
had their zeal for missions quickened by reading the Circle 
books. " — Steven Berkebile (Vice President of Fostoria, Ohio, 
Circles). 

The following reply to a query shows an appreciation of 
the Circle work : 

"You ask me as to my opinion of its value upon the life 
of the church and its activities. I have ever been impressed 
with the thought that there was no other one thing that so 
stirred our young people, as well as some of older years, as 
the Missionary Reading Circle. At its highest peak there were 
more than 2,000 members and these were scattered all over 
the Brotherhood. It became the forerunner of what later was 
known as 'the Christian Workers' Society' and which still 
later became the B.Y.P.D. Each of these later organizations 
cultured the missionary idea but did not give it a prominent 
place and the later generation in our church has grown up 
without much knowledge of the great first work of our church. 
Personally, I believe that this is one reason of our present lack 
of deep concern for our mission work. We have emphasized 
other activities, good in themselves, but we have minimized 
our teaching as to definite missionary work. I believe we 
need to get back to the ideals of the Missionary Reading Circle, 
if we would again stir our people along the line of world-wide 
evangelization. ,, — J. R. Snyder. 



CHAPTER VIII 



MINISTERIAL AND SUNDAY SCHOOL MEETINGS 

MINISTERIAL MEETINGS 

Until 1892 the territory which is now known as the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania belonged to the Middle 
District of Pennsylvania. 

The first ministerial meeting in Middle Pennsylvania was 
held in James Creek Church on December 12-14, 1889, H. B. 
Brumbaugh being moderator. The next meeting was held at 
Maitland, Pennsylvania, December 18-20, 1890, Jacob F. 
Oiler being moderator. At this meeting it was "unanimously 
decided to hold two ministerial meetings each year, one in the 
east end of the district and the other in the west". (History 
of the Church of the Brethren in the Middle District of 
Pennsylvania.) 

The meeting in the east end of the district was held in the 
Waynesboro Church on December 10-12, 1891. (Minutes of 
Antietam Congregation.) 




Ministerial Board 
Left to right: Levi K. Ziegler, Secretary; C. E. Grapes, President; 

G. Howard banner, Treasurer. 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 



347 



The next year the meeting was held in York. The Gospel 
Messenger for January 10, 1893, gives the following 
concerning it : 



Report of Ministerial Meeting 

The Brethren of Southern District of Pennsylvania held 
their annual Ministerial Meeting at York, Pennsylvania, for 
the first time since the division of the Middle District of Penn- 
sylvania was effected, as before announced, November 30, and 
December 1 and 2, 1892. They organized by electing Brother 
J. F. Oiler, of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, chairman; Brother 
C. L. Pfoutz, of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, treasurer; and 
Jacob Aldinger, of York, Pennsylvania, secretary. 

The meeting was well represented by the ministers of 
Southern Pennsylvania, and also by the Eastern District of 
Pennsylvania, Middle District of Pennsylvania and the 
Western District of Maryland. Many brethren took part in 
the discussion of the subjects, all in the best spirit and 
brotherly love. Many to whom this was a new thing, 
expressed themselves pleased beyond expectations. The pro- 
foundest love and peace prevailed during the whole meeting. 
Many of our York members desire it to be held at York soon 

The Sunday school question was very ably discussed by 
Brother S. R. Zug, of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The 
question, "What is the Best Method to Introduce the Preach- 
ing of the Gospel in Unoccupied Territory ?", was commented 
upon by J. F. Oiler, Albert Hollinger and Jacob Hollmger. 
Good results from the occasion are in prospect. 

Jacob Aldinger, Secretary. 

These meetings were held annually and in the fall of the 
year until 1901 when in response to a request from the District 
Sunday School Meeting it was decided to have them in con- 
junction with the Sunday school meetings. Since then they 
have been held in the summer on the day previous to the 
Sunday school meeting. There does not appear to be any 
available minutes of the ministerial meetings previous to 1914. 
The minute books of the Sunday school meetings give the place 
of meeting since 1901. Through research in old Gospel 
Messengers and elsewhere we have gleaned the following 
information concerning the time, place, and officers of the 
early meetings : 



Time 



1892 — November 30, 
December 1 



Church 



York 



Officers 

Chairman, J. F. Oiler, 

Waynesboro 
Secretary, Jacob Aldinger, 

York 
Treasurer, C. L. Pfoutz, 

Gettysburg 



348 History— Church Of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

Time Church Officers 

Chairman, Jacob Hollinger, 

1893— November 28, 29 Mechanicsburg Gr( : en S P T rin 1 f „ 

Secretary, J. B. Garver, 

Allen 
1894 — December 17, 18 Huntsdale No record 

Chairman, J. F. Oiler, 

1895— October 31 Ridge Congregation Q Waynesboro 

& & Secretary, W. A. Anthony, 

.,••'■•! Clay Hill 

Moderator, Isaac Barto, 
1896— November 12, 13 Upton Back Griffin, Maryland 

Creek Congregation Secretary, W. A. Anthony, 

Clay Hill 
1897— November 11, 12 York Officials not named 

Moderator, John Lehner, 
1898— October 12, 13 \™** Cumberland, Upton 

Mohler House Secretary, W. A. Anthony, 

Shady Grove 

1899-October 9, 10 J^Sg^ No record 

Moderator, Isaac Barto, 

1900 November 7 Falling Springs, Cordova, Maryland 

Hade House Secretary, W. A. Anthony, 

Shady Grove 

Moderator, Isaac Barto, 
1901 — November 20, 21 Waynesboro Mechanicsburg 

Secretary, F. D. Anthony 

sfe ik sk »'' 

•T" «T» »p. T. 

PROGRAMME 

Brethren's Ministerial Meeting 

For the 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT PENNSYLVANIA 

To be Held in the 

BACK CREEK CHURCH, AT UPTON, PENNSYLVANIA 

November 12, and 13, 1896 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 11th 

Sermon 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th 

8 :00 a. m. — Devotional Services and Organization. 

8:15 a. m. — Opening Address. The Object of Our Meeting. 

1. The Church : Her Mission. 

Orville Long, Wm. Koontz, John Fogelsanger. 

2. How Can We Best Secure a More Consecrated 

Ministry ? 

Andrew Bashore, Wm. Anthony, J. W. Deardorff. 

3. How to Make Home Mission Work a Greater Success. 

Jacob Hollinger, Henry Beelman, J. B. Ruthrauff. 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 349 

4. Elder's and Minister's Duty to the Church. 

Edmund Book, Jno. Trostle, Jos. Auker. 

5. The Relations of the Deacons to the Church and How 

They Work Most Successfully ? 

Moses Mummert, D. H. Baker, 
J. F. Stamy, D. Allison. 

6. Scriptural Sermon, How Prepared and How Delivered ; 

Should it be Textual, Topical or Expository ? 

C. L. Pfoutz, C. R. Oellig and Isaac Eby. 

7. How Can Greater Activity on the Part of Young 

Members in General Church Work be Produced ? 

J. A. Long, J. D. Games, D. Winger. 

8. The Need of Special Bible Terms of Ten Days or More 

Duration, Held in Our Home Churches. 

J. K. Miller, J. F. Oiler, D. C. Burkholder. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12th 

9. The Design of the Sunday School, (a) The Relation of 

the Church to the Sunday School, (b) The Aim of 
the Sunday School Teacher. 

Sam. M. Stouffer, D. M. Zuck, C. H. Balsbaugh. 

10. How Can We Make the Services at Our Love Feasts 

More Instructive ? 

Henry Etter, Isaac Riddlesberger, 
Josiah Eby, Christian Ness. 

11. Define and Apply. Gal. 3:27-29. 

Jacob Snyder, C. F. Hosfeld, 
Daniel Miller, Hezekiah Cook. 

12. Farewell Addresses. 

•A* *V vf* %1> 

*T* 1* *J* *T* 

The topics for the evening program of the ministerial day 
have varied. Since 1916 they have been educational in nature. 
This has been in response to a request from the General 
Educational Board of the church which was sent to District 
Meeting asking that an educational topic be given a place on 
the program at each of our annual ministerial meetings. 
(District Meeting minutes, 1916, Paper 5.) 

Topics at Evening Meetings on Ministerial Day 

1902 — Discussion of Ministerial Problems. 

1903— 

1904 — Literature: Its Effect on Family, Etc. — Spencer 
Beaver, G. G. Lehmer, J. H. Keller. 

1905 — Discussion of Ministerial Problems. 

1906— Sermon, "The Hidden Mystery", Eph. 3 :9— H. M. 
Stover. 

1907— Sermon, 2 Cor. 3:6— Albert Hollinger. 



350 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

1908 — The Educated Supported Ministry: How Best 
Brought About — H. K. Ober, S, E. L. Fogelsonger. 

1909— 

1910— 

1911 — What Attitude Should We Assume to the World 
on the Subjects of (a) Peace? (b) Temperance? — W. E. Roop, 
J. H. Keller, H. J. Brindle, J. A. Miller. 

1912 — Temperance — B. F. Lightner, Andrew Bowser, 
Lester Brumbaugh, J. H. Brindle, E. S. Miller, H. M. Stover, 
J. E. Trimmer. 

1913 — Missionary Meeting. 

1914 — Missionary Meeting — Florence Foglesanger, H. M. 
Stover, C. D. Bonsack, Prof. F. F. Holsopple. 

1915 — Discussion of Ministerial Problems. 

1916 — Program by Child Rescue Committee — Mrs. L. H. 
Leiter, J. H. Keller, M. A. Jacobs. 

1917 — Education of Ministry — Archie Hollinger, W. J. 
Swigart. 

1918 — The Church as an Educational Factor in the 
Community — B. C. Whitmore and J. H. Brindle. Educational 
Work as Fundamental to All Church Activities — H. D. Emmert 
and L. Elmer Leas. 

1919 — What Constitutes a Balanced Education — W. I. 
Schaeffer, L. W. Leiter. What Educational Advantages Are 
Necessary to Meet Present Day Requirements in the Ministry 
and the Sunday School — G. Howard Danner and J. J. Baugher. 

1920 — Our Waste Through Lack of Training and Our 
Gain Through Training — B. C. Whitmore and Wm. Culp. 
A College Education — for Good Citizenship, Etc. — A. R. 
Hollinger, H. D. Emmert and Ezra Wenger. 

1921 — Life's Preparation, Educational Demand and 
Supply — H. D. Emmert, J. G. Myer. 

1922 — What is Necessary for Life's Duties — Laban 
Leiter, Nathan Martin. 

1923 — Education in the Home — L. Elmer Leas. Educa- 
tion to Serve — John J. John. 

1924 — Forms of Christian Education (a) In the Home — 
G. Howard Danner; (b) In the Church — R. W. Scholsser. 

1925 — The Attitude of Southern Pennsylvania Toward 
Education — Wm. Kinsey. The Mightiest Thing in the World 
— T. T. Myers. 

1926 — Putting the Fourth R Into Christian Education — 
H. K. Ober. The Development of the Soul — Frank N. Sargent. 

1927 — What Constitutes a Christian Education — J. E. 
Myers. Is Modern Education a Help or a Hindrance to 
Salvation — G. Howard Danner. 

1928 — Welfare Program — Child Rescue Work — Ida 
Lightner, D. Y. Brillhart. Care of the Aged — B. F. Lightner, 
J. L. Myers. 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 351 

1929 — Our Young Members — Starting Them in Church 
Work — Beulah Baugher. Keeping Them in Usefulness for the 
Church — L. Elmer Leas. 

1930 — Social Purity Program — Essay Contest — Address 
by J. M. Moore. 

1931 — Lecture — Travels in the Holy Land — Levi 
Fahnestock. 

1932 — Lecture — Enemies of Youth — H. K. Ober. 

1933 — Lecture — Modern Evils — How Best Fortify Our 
Youth — R. W. Scholsser. 

1934 — Lecture — Some Objectives of Christian Education 
— Dr. J. I. Baugher. 

1935 — Lecture — Trends in Education — A. C. Baugher. 

1936-^A Triumphant Christ for the World — C. D. 
Bonsack. 

1937 — Sermon — The New Testament Confessional — 
James M. Moore. 

1938 — Address — The Church — J. M. Blough, of India. 

1939 — Address — God's Ministers a Flame of Fire — I. E. 
Oberholtzer. 

1940 — Address — The Meaning of Christian Education — 
R. W. Scholsser. 

1941 — Educational Address — Warren Bowman. 

Themes for Ministerial Meetings 

1936 — Christ in the Life of the Church. 
1937— The Welfare of the Church. 
1938 — The Program of the Church. 
1939— The Christian Ministry. 
1940 — Brethren in Christian Service. 
1941 — Building with Christ. 



in 

o 

z 

H 

u 

5 



o 
o 

u 

CO 

>■ 
<< 
Q 
2 

CO 



•8 
0) 

4) 

u 

0) 

co 



u 

o 

(0 

u 

0) 

o 



o 

< 






be* 
cs ° 
o ° 



c 
o 



I 



faJ 1 ? 
vim 



ffico 



CD 

• I— 1 



<D 



TO 
<D 
O 

c 

oS 

*h 
fa 



U 
CD 

a 



0) 

• i-H 

CO 



o 






s 

d£ 



CD 



as 

PQ 



TO 

cd 
o 

^"§ 

d£ 



o 



«i «i 



bo 

o 






0) 

• t-H 

(1) 

TO 

cd 

c 

u 

fa 



« 



o 

o . 

CO^ 



<D CD 

TO TO - 

fa fa ft 

CD CD jjg 

• -J 

GO CO 



(V) w 
CD -*-> 



<d u 

rC CD 

get: 

o as 
CO 






-5-2* 
<< <^fa 



<iffi ^> 



CD 

> 

O 

CO 



be 

o 



CD <v 

^^ 

a cd 



cot-^ Kb dt-j 



o 



cd 

> 
o 

CO 






CD 

.— < 
0) 

fcd fa 

fa bo 

ft TO 

go 






TO 
0) 

s 






bo 



o 

w 



CD 

o 

CO 



TO 
O 

03 
»-9 



<D 



J 




. ^H 


^ & 


S^ 


0) <i> 


<D« 


(3 a 




. IS 


fa»-» 


-i 



PQ 



TO 

CD 
g 






o 



3,j ^ j 3 ^* fe 
Jo wa dnj H^m 



-i 
O 

o 
I 

u 

en 

< 

Q 
Z 

D 
en 

Q 

Z 
< 

2 

H 
en 



- 
w 

H 
co 



0) 

hi 

(0 
0) 

J- 

O 

co 



(0 

Vi 

O 

4-* 

(0 
U 
0) 
TO 




?H 


*H 


<D 


<P 


X 




a 


<P 


PQ 


M 



CJ 



boi> 
o o 



ffi 



o 

11 

<JC0 

go 



> 

s 

CO 



W 



<D 

bo 

r- J Q) 

pq 
fa -; 





TO 


h 


rO 


<D 


O 


> < 


o 


•!-H 


C0 


a 


•-a 


CO 


^ 


fa 


• 

a 



<D 

PQ 



fa 

CD 

SB 

S3 
O 

CO 



Uco 



g 

s 

bo'o) 

C <D 

PQ 



o 



TO 

as 
CD 

CD 

s 






fa 

CD 



CD 
O 



oh; 



- 
CD 



W ffi 



CD 



O 

o 



CO 



Jg <iS «g ^a 



CO 



0) 

o 

(0 

— « CD i— i 



On 13 

TO 



- 

CD 

PQ 

TO 
C0 

fa 



o 



o 

TO 
CD 

a3 





b0 




h 




fl 


CD 


^ 


a 


TO 
PS 


tj 


CD 


TO 
-(J 


ft 


G 


ft 


3 


•f-H 


ffi 


CO 



PJ 

o 

CD 

P5 
P5 



CD 
> 
O 

P! 



CD 



> 




TO 




G 




as 


^ 


bo 


5h 


o 


O 


►3 


>H 



bo 

P$ 
TO 

a 

•i— i 

PJ 
as 

o 

CD 



TO 

PJ fa 
•Sh CD 

fa s 

TO S 

aS^ 

H 



b0 

u 
Pi 

TO 

PJ 
CD 
ft 
ft 

•l-H 

CO 



00 



00 



00 



CM 



CM 



CM 



CM 



00 



CO 
CM 



<M 
CM 



00 
CM 



0) 

E 



CO 



> 

o 



CM 
CM 



O 

O 



o 



ft 

CD 
CO 



> 

o 



CO 



ft 
CD 
CO 



CM 

• 

ft 
CD 
CO 



CO 
CM 

• 

ft 
CD 
CO 



ft 
CD 
CO 



bo 



CM 
CM 



bo 



CM 

bo 
Pi 



CM 



bo 
J3 



CM 

O 

as 



CO 

o 
as 



o 
as 



o 
as 



CO 

o 
as 



o 
as 



oo 
o 
as 



as 

o 
as 



o 
as 



as 



CM 

as 



CO 

tH 

as 



as 



en 
O 

2 

H 

UJ 

u 

S 



o 
o 

u 

en 

< 
Q 
Z 

CO 



*l 

u 
u 
(1) 

en 



u 



ed 

h 

4) 
O 



CD 

X L, 

w a; 

Km 



be 

• l-H 

I— I 
I— H 

a> 
O 

d 



l. 

O 

PQ 



o 

c« ■ 



L< 
<D 

> 

O 



<D 



«JU ffi^ 



PJ 

Li a3 



QQ 

03 

l* 
cd 



e rt 






as ^j 

MOT 



£o 
cd aj 



JS 



Lt 

CD 
L<cfc! 
CD ;3 

J=« O 
CD •+-> 



* 

cd 

•i— • 

Li 
PQ 

W 



Ll 03 
CD <D 



03 

be 



W 



03 j_, 
^ CD 

tf PQ 



Pi 

as 

o 



Li 

CD Li 
> CD 

OS 
-M CD 



cd 

PS 

be 

P 
03 

PQ 
m 



w 

ti en 
cd^j 



L. 
<D 
m 

O 

PQ 



T3 

o3 t* 
*% CD 

o"cd 



b£ 

C 
• i— < 

CD 

CD 









-4-> CD 
""^ 

°^ 

Cji <-! 

CO <d 
rH -q< 

• i-H 

be <d 
o £ 



<D be cd 



o 



SCD 

«H 

as 

!>> * ft 

a3 <D^ 
-^> -+-> 
cd en 

CD C cS 
CDS j2 



CD ' 

•5 <u 

O M 

Li O 

+* O 

CU oa 
Li 

^ OS 

^§ 



be 



s * 



CD . i 



^"^ KW ^'^ ffl'S ^& ^ ^W 3^. WW ^Q JW 

^ffi H^H^ oK ^ri h^J H^d W^ ^^ 



h^t-^ ^w d^ 



^Ph* 






O 

o 

X 

u 

en 

< 

Q 
2 

D 
en 

Q 
2 

< 

< 

H 
en 



H 
en 

mm 

2 



L 

ti 

■>-> 

cu 

L 
U 

en 



L 


L 
4) 





CD 

bO^ 



L. 

CD 
> 

O 

c72 



^ be 

CD.^ 
OS CD 

WO 



^^ dd 



t: 

CD 

£ 
S 



CD 



E| 

CD O 
OS 



CD 
(72 






PQcn 



^ dw 



DO 

CD 

L- 

CD 






be 

• r— I 

O 



be 

•-3 



w 

LiX5 
CD O 

03 OS 

da 



cd 

i—i 

o 

« 

1-3 



CD 



L, 
CD 



12 



Li 

CD' 

be 

PQ 
w 



D 

03 



be 

03 O 



Lj 

CD 

O 

PQ 

^3 



Li 

CD 

C72PQ 



CD 



L* 
CD 






Li >» 

CD V 

> C 

O a) 



CD 

is 

•S <D 



L. 
> L, 

O 0) 



c^cvi ^Q w *p^ 
^<i ffi^ ^d WhJ 



u 

D 

oS v 
QQ^ 



D 
D 



^fo j^- cq'k h4a 

h^PQ 



^2 L. 
O cD 

CD W 

03 £ 

.PQ 
< . 

1-9 



d^ Wi-i d^ ^^ 



CD 
L. 

o 

<^ <D 

en C 
<D "-"• 

S w 

03 • 



O CD 
* OS 

^PQ 

^d 



0) 

o 
cd 



^CD 

M 
• i— i 

Lh 
03 



CD 

W 



CD 
> 
O 
Li 

o 

CD 



L 



O 
P^ 

CD 

s 



u 

o 



PI 

o 



be 

L- 
CD 

rO. 

s 

03 



CD 

i— • 

•i-H 
> 

03 

be 

o 

.-Q 



CD 

CJ 

• 1-1 

L. 

Ph 



P3 

03 
• i—i 

s 

CD 

PQ 



o 

L, 

o 

OT 
CD 

03 



o 
+-> 
Li 

CD 

PQ 



en 
CD 

s 

a 

a 



CO 



oa 



CO 



LO 



CO 



CM 



O 
CO 



CM 



'M 



Oi 



00 



\a 



a 



DO 



lO 



CO 



CM 



CO 
CM 



CM 



00 



1) 
E 



be 



be 



be 



be 



hi, 
< 



be 



be 



be 



be 

< 



be 



«1 



be 



be 






CO 
rH 

Oi 



^5 



X 



—i 



3 

M 
35 



M 

35 



(M 
(M 



CO 
CM 

Oi 



CM 



CM 



CO 
<M 



CM 







(ft 

0) 

• P4 

h 














































J 


2 

U 

4) 


























o 


























o 


co 


























I 




























u 




























CO 




























>< 




























< 




























D 












5-1 
<D 








51 








2 












u 5 








^ bf) 


cu 




3 

z 


D 

CO 


(0 
h 
4) 




. Jacobs 
r. Group 

Baker 
. Stover 


. Jacobs 
Moore 


. Group 
Baker 


mer Leas 
. Jacobs 


Rowland 
K. Ziegle 

>ward Dar 
Godfrey 


Bowser 
Snavely 


Grapes 
. Markey 


>> 

F— I 

> 
C 


Sellers 
Buffenmy 

J. Hassim 
Miller 


Buffenmyi 


r Keeney 
Mentzer 


U 




• * . • 


• 


»< 


H > WO 


** 


H^ 


• 


™££>i 


t< 


Walte 
M. B. 








g^dwg^ 


£d j'S 


. CO • . 


i-JW dS 


W 


^J Ob H^ 


j 






CD 








5h 






0) 


^ 






DAY SCHOO 


J 

< 

5 


CO 

0) 

• p< 

h 

(0 

hi 
o 
0) 

co 


S. Sellers 

B. Sollenberg 

E. Grapes 

C. Godfrey 

S. Sellers 
W. Whitacre 


C. Godfrey 
E. Grapes 


E. Myers 

S. Sellers 


B. Sollenberg* 
W. Whitacre 
E. Baugher 

S. Sellers 


w 

5-H 
0) 

>> 

g 

H 


I. Thomas 
A. Evans ( ? ) 

Howard Dann 
C. Godfrey 


.rl S. Kipp 
as. A. Schwen 

I. Thomas 
bert Ditmer 


M 

• 

P 


PS 

•i— i 

i— H 

o 
o 

O 

(D 






£d dc/2 


£^ 


coO 


b£ 


t) i-» H S5 


• 

t-8 


>-i< Ooj 


HU b« 


W 


O 


Z 


CO 


























D 


s 




















^_i 






w 


§ 




CO 


0) 






5-i 


5h 
CD 












Q 

Z 

< 

-J 


09 

h 
O 

(6 
U 
0) 

O 


s M. Moo: 
mer Leas 

Baker 
. Group 


s M. Moc 
mer Leas 


Baker 
. Bowser 


K. Ziegler 
mer Leas 


Godfrey 
Grapes 

mer Leas 
K. Ziegle 


. Harlach 
. Group 


Baugher 
Muck 


b£ 

o 

s 


Valentin 
Sollenber: 

Lehigh 
Mentzer 


ft 

o 

o 


Sellers 
Danner 


< 
U 




s 


Jame 
L. El 

C. L. 
W. G 


Jame 
L. El 


C. L. 

Dan'l 

Levi 
L. El 


S. C. 
C. E. 

L. El] 
Levi 

G. W 
W. G 


A. S. 
H. C. 




M. C. 
C. B. 

S. M. 
M. B. 




N. S. 
J. M. 












A 


J4 














m 




























■— • » 












3 


O 














2 












r£ 


5h 




















1 






o 


bJD 




(V 

• r—t 
> 










s 




0) 

u 


•3 




CJD 


[rch 
bur 
















e 


•i— ( 

0) e$ 


o 

P3 




ft 


First Chu 
Chambers 


>• 

O 




^) 


CD 


i— i 










Carlisl 
New F 


1— ( 

P5 


o 
-^ 

ft 


in 

<D 

0) 

5-1 
H 


1— ( 

P5 


H 


in 


Mumm 
Prices 


T3 


o 








<£> in 


Tt« 


CO 


i— i 


t- CO 


CM 


t^ 


in> 


Ttf CO 


00 










tH i-H 


tH 


1— 1 


tH 


iH CM 


CM 


CM 


















CO 


CM 


O 


o cm~ 


i— 1 






CO CM 












rH r- 1 


T— 1 


tH 


tH 


iH CM 


CM 


CM 














0) 

g 


bh bh 


bh 


bh 


ci) 


bio bi 


bJC 


bi) 


tc 


bh bh 


bJD 


bh 








1 * 




1 




i 


53 


<3 


3 3 




3 

1 


S 
^ 




J3 S3 

< < 


3 


3 

< 








oo Oi 


o 


T— 


i 


CM 


c» 


3 X 


< 


ir 


5 


Ci 


5 


t> 


(X 


3 o 


1 


c 


i 


^ 


-1 








CM CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO CO 


"^ 


Tj< 










4 




c 


J 


__l 


a 


1 C 


2 


o 


i 


o 


1 


Ci 


a 


i C 


i 


c 


1 





5 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 355 

Because of a lack of information concerning the early 
Ministerial Meetings an error had been made for several years 
on our Ministerial Meeting programs as to the number of 
meetings held in our district. To correct this error the follow- 
ing paper was presented to and accepted by the Ministerial 
Meeting of August 2, 1939 : 

Statement to Clarify the Number of Ministerial, Sunday School 

and District Meetings Held in the Southern District 

of Pennsylvania Since its Organization 

The Southern District of Pennsylvania of the Church of 
the Brethren was organized in the Lower Cumberland Church 
in May, 1892. The first Ministerial Meeting thereafter was 
held in the York church in December of that year ( 1892) . The 
first District Meeting was held in the Codorus church in April 
of the following year (1893). Two District Meetings were 
held in the year 1913 (April and October) thus equalizing the 
number of Ministerial and District Meetings. 

The first Sunday school meeting was held in the 
Waynesboro church in June, 1899, seven years after the first 
Ministerial Meeting. 

Hence the Ministerial Meeting held today is the 48th 
since the organization of the district ; the Sunday school meet- 
ing of tomorrow will be the 41st; and the District Meeting in 
October will be the 48th. 

Sudie M. Wingert, 
Secretary of the Historical Committee. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL MEETINGS 

At a business meeting of the Antietam Congregation on 
April 8, 1899, a paper was presented from the officers and 
teachers of the Waynesboro Sunday School asking permission 
to hold a general Sunday school meeting composed of the 
Waynesboro and neighboring schools of the German Baptist 
Brethren. Permission was granted. 

At the District Meeting of Southern Pennsylvania four 
days later (April 12, 1899) a petition was presented from the 
York church asking permission to hold a district Sunday school 
meeting in the Southern District of Pennsylvania. The petition 

was granted. 

Before the adjournment of the District Meeting, Elder 
Jacob Snider of the Antietam Congregation who was a member 
of the Waynesboro Sunday School, extended an invitation to 
those interested in Sunday school work to come to Waynesboro 
for the first district Sunday school meeting. A few weeks later 
the following invitation was sent to the schools of the district: 



356 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

TO WHOM PRESENTED : 

You, with all friends of Sunday School Work 

Are hereby cordially invited to be present at the 

Session of a Sunday School Meeting of 

The German Baptist Brethren, 

Of the Southern District of Pennsylvania, 

(Authorized by the York District Meeting) 

To be Held in Waynesboro Church on 

7th and 8th of June, 1899. 

Committee on Invitation and Transportation, 

Jos. E. Rohrer, F. S. Boerner, and J. C. Emmert. 

>£ jjc >Jc * 



"l» f 



Following is a copy of the program of this first district 
Sunday school meeting: 

SUNDAY SCHOOL MEETING 

of 

THE GERMAN BAPTIST BRETHREN 

of 

SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 

June 7th and 8th, 1899 

WAYNESBORO, PENNSYLVANIA 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 7th 

Sermon Elder W. J. Swigart 

THURSDAY, 9:00 O'CLOCK A.M. 

Organization 

Address of Welcome Harvey Emmert 

Responsive Albert Hollinger 

Music 

Topic — "The Purpose of a Sunday School 

Meeting" W. A. Anthony 

Music 

General Discussion — "Further Benefits Which May be Derived 

from Such Meetings" 
Music 
Topic — "The Sunday School Organization and 

Government" Benj. Ranck 

General Discussion 
Music 

Queries U. W. Harshman 

Essay — "The Sunday School Teacher" Mrs. Sarah K. Saylor 

General Discussion 
Music 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 357 

THURSDAY, 1:30 O'CLOCK P.M. 

Special Song Service 

Topic — "Helps and Literature for Sunday School 

Work"_ G. G. Lehmer 

General Discussion 

Music 

Topic — "Home Training in its Relation to Sunday 

School Work" H. Shellenberger 

General Discussion 

Music 

Topic — "How May the Sunday School Aid in Maintaining the 

True Conception of Plainness?" J. D. W. Deardorff 

General Discussion 
Music 

BUSINESS SESSION, 5 TO 6 P.M. 
THURSDAY EVENING, 8:00 O'CLOCK 

Music 

Essay — "Woman's Work in the Sunday 

School" Mrs. Wealthy Burkholder 

Address — "From Sunday School Scholar to Church 

Member" Joseph Long 

Music 

Address — "How to Put in Practice What We Have 

Heard" F. D. Anthony 

Valedictory— "The Holy Spirit" C. H. Balsbaugh 

Music 



«.v »^ ..».. »t» 

»f» n» t> 'i- 



The organization of this meeting was as follows: 
Moderator, W. A. Anthony; assistant moderator, C. R. Oellig; 
secretary, A. S. Hershey ; assistant secretary, E. S. Rinehart. 

During the business session from 5 to 6 P.M. "An ideal 
constitution for our Sunday School Meeting was presented by 
C. C. Johnson". It was "adopted by the meeting after a few 
slight changes" were made. 

C. C. Johnson, J. G. Miller, J. D. W. Deardorff, Lizzie 
Lehmer, and Sudie Wingert were appointed as a committee to 
select a list of 100 books suitable for a Sunday school library. 

"The following executive committee was appointed to 
serve the ensuing year: Mitchel Stover, A. S. Hershey, Harry 
Shellenberger, Kate W. Baughman, and Wealthy Burkholder." 

The Sunday School Meeting for 1900 was held in the 
York church on December 27 at which time G. G. Lehmer was 
moderator and J. G. Miller, secretary. At this meeting Anson 
Good was elected as our first Sunday school treasurer. 

At the meeting in the Good Will Church, Lost Creek 
Congregation, on August 23, 1901, only seven schools were 
represented. Joseph Long was moderator and Sudie M. 



B58 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Wingert, secretary. Brother C. G. Trimmer, of York, 
Pennsylvania, was delegated to represent this meeting at the 
ministerial meeting in the fall and ask it to consider the pro- 
priety of hereafter holding these two meetings at the same 
place, and of having the Sunday school meeting the day 
preceding or day following the ministerial meeting. 

No report is given in the minutes concerning the response 
to this request but the printed programs for the next year were 
for the ministerial and Sunday school meeting at the Huntsdale 
meeting house, November 6 and 7, 1902. Since then they have 
always been held at the same time and place. 

Gleanings from Sunday School Meeting Minutes 

September 8, 1905 — It was decided to print the minutes 
of this meeting and distribute them in the Sunday schools. 

November 2, 1906 — Decided to make a full report of 
next year's ministerial and Sunday school meeting. 

September 7, 1907 — Decided to employ a shorthand 
reporter for the ministerial and Sunday school meetings next 
year. Also decided "to hold a collection at the close of the 
evening session of the ministerial meeting". 

August 11, 1908 — York Sunday School asked that these 
meetings be held on Wednesday and Thursday instead of 
Thursday and Friday. Tabled. Reconsidered the printing of 
the full report of the ministerial and Sunday school meetings. 
Decided to print the annual report in booklet form and that a 
nominal price of 15 cents per booklet be paid by each 
congregation for the number they order. 

September 24, 1909 — The treasurer's report showed a 
deficit of $84 due to his not being able to dispose of all reports 
of the last year's meeting. 

September 2, 1910 — Decided not to have any more full 
reports printed until further investigation proves it to be wise. 

Decided that for three years this meeting be held not 
later than August 25. 

"Resolved that all ministers in attendance at our Sunday 
school meeting shall have the privilege of voting with the 
delegate body in the business session." 

District secretary, J. H. Keller, reported a church 
membership of 3,743 in the district. (Our district occupies a 
territory of nearly 10,000 square miles, August, 1911.) 

August 18, 1911 — Secretary reported that Waynesboro 
Sunday School graduated 17 teacher training pupils. 

August 23, 1912 — Decided to publish all papers read at 
this Sunday school meeting. 

August 22, 1913 — Decided to print Ora Good's paper. 

August 16, 1918 — Owing to the rambling vote according 
to the old method of election, it was decided that in the future, 
nominations for office shall be made before voting. 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 359 

August 15, 1919 — In response to a petition from the 
Waynesboro Sunday School, it was decided that the Sunday 
schools of our district should contribute funds for the purchase 
of an automobile for the use of our workers at Vada, India. 
It was also decided that each Sunday school should take a 
special offering for this purpose during the month of 
September and forward it to the General Mission Board before 
October 1. 

August 13, 1920 — Decided that the secretary of the 
ministerial meeting shall hereafter be the secretary of the 
Sunday school meeting also. 

August 24, 1921 — Report was made that auto has been 
purchased and is now on field. 

August 17, 1922 — "Decided that all officers except secre- 
tary shall be elected by ballot from nominations. The 
nominations shall be limited to the delegates. " 

August 24, 1924 — (P. 8) A request was presented by the 
Children's Aid Society of the district asking that "This meeting 
recommend that each school in our district lift an offering each 
year on Children's Day for the work of the Children's Aid 
Society". Request was granted. 

August 12, 1925 — "The Sunday School Board which was 
created by the District Meeting of 1924 were named as follows : 
H. J. Shellenberger, Trostle P. Dick, Ralph Lehman, N. S. 
Sellers, G. Howard Danner. 

"In order to encourage our young people, our district 
joined with Eastern Pennsylvania in holding our first joint 
Young Peoples Conference at Salunga, July 29. The meeting 
proved to be a success and a resolution asking to have it 
continued was passed unanimously." 

August 18, 1927 — "We would call attention to a change 
made by the General Sunday School Board which changes the 
end of the Sunday school year from December 31 to 
September 30." 

August 16, 1928 — On motion it was decided that we 
recommend all schools to begin their school year October 1, 
including the change in the time of their organization. 

August 17, 1933 — Board of Christian Education peti- 
tioned the meeting: "That every Sunday school in the district 
be requested to send a yearly offering with their delegates to 
the annual Sunday school convention for the promotion of the 
work of the board". Passed. 

August 23, 1934 — (P. 8). Following resolution from 
Board of Christian Education was adopted : "Be it resolved 
that : This convention urges our churches, ministers, teachers, 
and Sunday schools to make a renewed effort to establish those 
to whom they minister more firmly in the faith of Jesus Christ 
and His Gospel, in the hope that such anti-Christian influences 
as Nazism and kindred influences may be intelligently 
combatted." 



3C0 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

August 23, 1934 — (P. 7). A suggestion was made to 
change the method of organization in order to conserve time 
now used in organizing. A motion was carried requesting the 
Board of Christian Education and the Ministerial Board to 
draft a query and present it to the District Meeting, requesting 
the district to authorize the program committee of each 
respective meeting to effect the organization. 

At the District Meeting in 1934 (District Meeting 
Minutes, p. 35, paper 8), the above named boards presented 
the following paper which was accepted : 

"Having been asked by the Sunday School Meeting of 
1934, held in Chambersburg, August 23, to formulate a simple 
plan for electing the officers of the annual ministerial and 
Sunday school meetings, we beg to submit the following plan : 

"The program committee shall prepare a ballot, nomi- 
nating two persons for each office, namely, moderator of the 
Ministerial Meeting, secretary, and moderator of the Sunday 
School Meeting. The moderator of the Ministerial Meeting 
and the secretary are to be elected in a business session of the 
Ministerial Meeting. The moderator of the Sunday School 
Meeting is to be elected in a business session of the Sunday 
School Meeting. The one receiving the highest number of 
votes shall be declared elected and the other shall be the 
assistant in each instance. In the event of a tie vote the one 
first named on the ballot shall be declared elected and the 
other shall be the assistant in each instance. 

"The secretary and assistant secretary elected in the 
Ministerial Meeting shall serve also in the Sunday School 
Meeting. 

"The officers shall serve in their respective offices in the 
meetings held the year following their election. 

"Ministers shall constitute the voting body in the 
Ministerial Meeting. Delegates to the Sunday School Meeting 
shall constitute the voting body in the Sunday School 
Meeting." 



District Sunday School Treasurer 

1900 — Anson Good, one year. 

1901 — J. O. Smith, one year. 

1902 and 1903 — J. H. Shellenberger, two years. 

1904 — C. J. Trimmer, 14 years (resigned). 

1918 — H. J. Shellenberger, McAllisterville, Pennsylvania, 
eight years. (Served until death.) 

1926 — Norman Shellenberger, eight years, when office of 
Sunday school treasurer was discontinued by recommendation 
of the Board of Christian Education, (1934). 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 361 



District Sunday School Secretary 

1898 — "This District Meeting decided to authorize the 
moderator to appoint a committee of three brethren on Sunday 
school statistics, and they to report yearly to the District 
Meeting," appointment, W. A. Anthony, three years ; Orville 
V. Long, two years ; S. M. Stouff er, one year. 

1899 — "Meeting dismissed the Sunday school committee 
that was appointed in 1898. The moderator appointed 
W. A. Anthony Sunday school secretary for the district to serve 
one year and the appointment was confirmed by the meeting." 

The district Sunday school secretary was elected annually 
by the District Meeting until 1907 when in response to a 
request from the Sunday School Meeting the delegates of the 
latter meeting were given the privilege of electing the district 
secretary. At the district meeting of 1914 the District Meeting 
again assumed the privilege of electing the district Sunday 
school secretary in accordance with the Annual Meeting 
minutes of June 23, 1914. The secretary was thereafter 
elected for a term of three years and given the privilege of 
appointing his own assistants. In 1934 by recommendation 
of the Board of Christian Education the office of Sunday school 
district secretary was discontinued. 

District Sunday School Secretaries 

1899 — W. A. Anthony, seven years, (resigned). 
1906 — J. H. Keller, 17 years, (resigned). 
1923 — Howard Danner, 11 years, (until office was 
discontinued in 1934). 

Annual Report of the German Baptist Brethren Sunday 

Schools of the Southern District of Pennsylvania, for 

the Year Ending December 31, 1905 



LOCAL 
CONGREGATIONS 

AND ■» 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS J 

-si 

© g 

Antietam — 

Welty 65 

Mt. Vernon 62 

Waynesboro 270 

Back Creek — 

Upton 70 

Shanks 75 

Brants 61 







~c 


CO 


s 












'» 


to 


o 


•~ 










■A 


0B 


* r+-l 


t_. 










■- 


O 


80 


to 










<§ 


a, 

v. S 


CO 
to 




y- 


Sw 


to 


© 


of Money 
he Year 


of Money 

Missiona 

evolent P 


•** 

SB 

O 


. S. Schol 
d Within 


en 

' pa 


8 

to 

— » 

c 
to 




v£ 




*3S 


SB 


^£ 


•s. 


Q 


*" to 


to to 
K to 


2 s 


© to 




^8 




$ 

£ 




2 to- 
ss to 




1 |^ 

^ 1 


© 


5" 8 


5h 


R 




38 


7 $ 25.48 


$ 4.50 


9 








38 


3 


16.00 




6 


4 




1 


207 


17 


229.36 


12.00 


12 


20 


1 


1 


55 


8 


71.56 


44.00 


12 


1 






40 


8 


40.00 


15.00 


12 


6 


1 


1 


34 


6 


15.24 


2.71 


6 


1 







362 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 






LOCAL 
CONGREGATIONS 

AND 
SUNDAY SCHOOLS 



s 



eg 






s 

Q 



O 

ft 

^4 






oo 



CO 






o 






o 



*>N 









CO 

0) 


s 


«rfi 


s 


<tt 


«55 


to 


•♦o 


CO 


SI 


e 

a, 


.•w 




^ 


CQ.S 


£ 


Q 






fc 


w ?> 


c 


a 


• S 


e 


*» 


o © 


OS 


o 


£o 


&i 


&3 



<a o 

to| k£ 

«sti ^ to 

§ ■" i o I $ 

Codorus — 

New Freedom 76 44 7 38.72 12.50 12 3 

Pleasant Hill 33 6 5 6.00 6 

Marks 39 25 5 14.13 8 

Codorus 99 57 9 71.21 20.00 12 1 

Falling Springs — 

Browns Mill 50 30 6 42.00 30.00 10 1 1 

Hanover — 

Hanover 60 34 6 30.00 5.00 12 1 

Lower Cumberland — 

Mechanicsburg ___ 141 66 12 73.00 17.30 12 1 

Pleasant View 75 55 9 48.26 12 

Bakers 86 57 8 34.00 14.62 12 3 

Lost Creek — 

Good Will 130 90 14 6 10 

Marsh Creek — 

Marsh Creek 60 38 3 19.00 7 

Perry — 

Three Springs 43 30 10.55 6 

Ridge — 

Ridge 62 55 6 34.87 15.00 9 2 

Maple Grove 60 37 5 15.00 6 

Shippensburg 70 50 7 51.27 15.00 12 2 

Sugar Valley — 

Eastville 58 40 6 14.73 

Upper Conewago — 

East Berlin 105 60 9 45.79 15.10 12 2 

Upper Codorus — 

Black Rock 75 61 6 6.25 12 

Upper Cumberland — 

Green Spring 60 54 6 30.50 10.00 6 

Huntsdale 90 50 7 85.00 20.00 6 

York- 
York 292 179 22 370.68 240.51 12 14 1 1 

Totals 2,367 1,530 107 $1,438.60 $493.24 69 6 4 

J. H. Keller, District Secretary. 



Missions in Our District Sunday School 

November 7, 1902 — Petition, "We, the Sunday school of 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, do ask that this Sunday School 
Meeting consider the question of the Sunday schools of 
Southern District of Pennsylvania supporting a missionary in 
the field". Deferred one year. 

October 23, 1903 — C. R. Oellig was appointed to ask each 
Sunday school in the district how much money it will con- 
tribute annually for a period of five years toward the support 



Ministerial and Sunday School Meetings 363 

of a missionary on the foreign field or how much it will 
contribute for a missionary at home. 

"Decided to give $15 for home mission work." 

September 8, 1905 — Report of Brother C. R. Oellig on 
missionary project. Thirteen schools have pledged to assist. 
Preference being for home missions. 

November 2, 1906 — Report of Brother C. R. Oellig on 
missionary project. Thirteen schools have pledged to assist. 
One hundred eighty-three dollars and fifty cents ($183.50) 
has been pledged to be paid annually by the Sunday schools 
for a term of five years for support of a district Sunday school 
missionary as follows: Bakers, $5; Buffalo, $5; Codorus, $20; 
East Berlin, $5; Good Will, $15; Green Spring, $10; Hanover, 
$5 ; Huntsdale, $25 ; Mechanicsburg, $6.50 ; New Freedom, 
$12; Ridge, $10; Shank, $5; Waynesboro, $30; Welty, $5; 
White Spring, $5 ; York, $25. 

Our district Sunday school secretary, J. H. Keller, was 
appointed our district Sunday school missionary. 

September 7, 1907 — "It was agreed to reconsider the 
supporting of a district Sunday school missionary. Also 
agreed that the amount pledged by the Sunday schools should 
be used to support a home missionary in the Southern District 
of Pennsylvania. " 

September 24, 1909 — Decided that the money of the 
Sunday school for district work be paid annually by Sunday 
school treasurer to the District Mission Board to be used by 
them for missionary work in the district, keeping in mind the 
work of the Sunday school. 

August 28, 1914 — Prof essor F. F. Holsopple, representing 
the Anti-Saloon League, gave a very helpful address on 
temperance work. Offerings turned over to World Wide 
Mission Fund. 

August 19, 1917 — "The treasurer called attention to the 
surplus that was in his hands. Decided that secretary be 
empowered to call on help to do more work throughout the 
district and thereby make use of the surplus." 

August 16, 1918 — (P. 5). It was decided to support a 
missionary on the foreign field. Also that: "the moderator 
appoint a committee of three to draft plans for the support of 
the missionary to present the same at a later stage of the 
meeting". Committee — E. S. Miller, C. L. Baker, and H. M. 
Stover. 

1918 — (P. 7). Committee presented following: "We, 
the Sunday School Meeting of the Church of the Brethren of 
Southern District of Pennsylvania in convention assembled 
this 16th day of August, 1918, in behalf of the Sunday schools 
that we represent, do heartily and unanimously agree to 
support a missionary on the foreign field. 



364 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

"The cost of maintenance shall be paid each year by the 
treasurer of the Sunday School Meeting from a fund created 
for that purpose. 

"Special offerings shall be taken quarterly by each 
Sunday school and sent to the treasurer for this specific work. 

"We recommend that a committee of three be appointed 
who shall look out among us young men and women who are 
willing to be used in the Lord's work on the foreign fields. " 
Report accepted. 

August 15, 1919 — It was decided that a committee of 
three be appointed to find a suitable person for the foreign 
field. 

"It was also moved and passed that the said committee 
at once confer with the General Mission Board relative to the 
support of a missionary now in the field : such support to 
continue until they find some one from our district." 

August 13, 1920 — Above committee reported no 
missionary available. Committee continued. 

August 25, 1921 — Committee reported there is no 
missionary on field not provided for. 

August 17, 1922 — "It was decided that the Sunday 
schools of the Southern District of Pennsylvania shall support 
Brother Adam Ebey located in Ahwa-Dang, India. 

August 30, 1923 — Decided to donate to the General 
Mission Board $550 for the purpose of sending another 
missionary into the field. 

August 14, 1924 — Decided to support two foreign 
missionaries instead of one during the year 1925. 

Unanimously decided to donate $400 to the Home Mission 
Board. 

August 12, 1925 — "We, the Mission Board of Southern 
Pennsylvania, kindly ask the Sunday schools of the district, 
assembled in convention in Waynesboro, to give yearly to the 
treasurer of the board, an amount equal to the amount given 
to the General Mission Board, for the support of Brother Ebey. 
This amount to be used in mission work in the district looking 
toward the employment of a field worker." Paper 
unanimously passed. 

August 19, 1926 — Decision to support a second missionary 
on the foreign field was effective for the year 1925 only. 

August 18, 1927 — The treasurer was instructed to pay to 
the district mission treasurer the same amount that he sends 
to the General Mission Board. 

August 13, 1931 — Decided to continue support of 
Brother Ebey another year. 

August 11, 1932 — "Decided to give $550 for support of 
Sister H. Stover Kulp on the African field, since Brother Adam 
Ebey does not now serve as a missionary. 

1937, 1938, 1939, 1940 — Continuing the support of Mrs. 
H. Stover Kulp. 



CHAPTER IX 



WOMEN'S WORK ORGANIZATION 

Aid Societies were functioning: in the churches of Southern 
Pennsylvania for many years prior to the organization of 
Women's Work as we have it today (1941). There were 18 
such working groups of women, at one time, who proved them- 
selves most self-sacrificing and enthusiastic in their efforts to 
provide for the needy at home, to share in promoting the work 
of the church, and to do their bit in sending the Gospel of the 
Lord Jesus Christ to those who had never heard of God's Plan 
of Salvation. Their work was indeed significant and far 
reaching. Many good deeds done in the early days stand 
today as testimony to their credit. Through a number of years 
records of their work were cared for by a district secretary, 
until in 1929-1930 when many districts of the Brotherhood 
were organizing for a definite and larger program of activity 
for the women of the church. 

There being a strong sentiment among some of the district 
Aid Societies of Southern Pennsylvania for a District Women's 
Work Organization, our district secretary of Sisters' Aid 
Societies, Mrs. C. E. Grapes, recommended in her report to 
District Meeting of 1930, "That a short period be arranged on 
Tuesday of the next year's District Meeting for organization." 

Accordingly in the forenoon of October 27, 1931, at 
District Meeting in the Carlisle Church, the women of the 
district held a meeting under the leadership of Mrs. Ross 
Murphy — the national president of Women's Work in the 
Church of the Brethren. 

At this time it was unanimously agreed to carry forward 
the "Larger Women's Work Project", and three persons were 
chosen, who in connection with the secretary (Mrs. C. E. 
Grapes) should formulate some plan by which a fuller and 
permanent organization might become effective. The follow- 
ing persons were elected to work out this program : Mrs. Grace 
Ziegler, Mrs. Jesse Whitacre, Miss Sudie M. Wingert. They 
presented to District Meeting of 1931 the following paper, 
which was approved : 

"The women of the Church of the Brethren of Southern 
Pennsylvania, in the general assembly at Carlisle, October 27, 
unanimously decided to carry forward the larger Women's 
Work program as outlined by the General Brotherhood and 
authorized by Annual Conference. 

"As a step toward developing this program we recom- 
mend to District Meeting assembled at Carlisle, October 28, 



366 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

1931, the following Woman's Work Organization for one 
year: 

44 1. That Sister C. E. Grapes be retained as 
secretary-treasurer, and Sister Grace Ziegler as 
director of Women's Work, with Sisters Sudie 
Wingert and Jessie Whitacre as additional 
members. 
"Our thought is that these officers continue in office for 
one year, the permanent program and period of office of each 
to be worked out at a conference of women to be held some- 
time previous to the District Meeting of 1932, to which it will 
be presented for approval." "Mrs. C. E. Grapes." 
(Approved.) (Copied from the minutes of District Meeting 
of 1931.) Minutes for 1932 as follows: 

At District Meeting 1932, October 25 at 2 P.M.— A 
woman's meeting was held in the Codorus Church. Mrs. Grace 
Ziegler, the director of Woman's Work for the district, 
presided. Devotions were conducted by Miss Emma Miller. 
Mrs. Ziegler gave an address on "The Woman's Work Program 
as Seen from Anderson". She pointed out the many ways by 
which we can share our spiritual heritage. We were 
impressed with our responsibility to do our bit in helping 
others. Our attention was directed to the resources which are 
ours through the promise of Christ, "Lo, I am with you 
alway." A temperance reading entitled "Hettie Rea" was 
effectively given by Mrs. Jos. Rittenhouse. The ladies' 
choruses of Codorus and York each furnished special music ; 
Closing devotions were in charge of Mrs. J. I. Thomas, of 
Smithsburg, Maryland. 

During the business period of this meeting, the committee 
which had been appointed at the last District Meeting to draft 
a plan for permanent organization submitted these 
recommendations : 

"We, your committee appointed by the women and 
approved by the District Meeting of Southern Pennsylvania 
assembled at Carlisle, October 27, 28, 1931, to present some 
plan by which a permanent organization of the larger 
(program) of Women's Work in the district might be effected, 
beg to submit to District Meeting through elders' meeting, the 
following plan: 

"1. That the organization shall consist of the 
following officers: President, Vice President, 
Secretary-Treasurer, Director of Missions, and 
Director of Children's Work. 
"2. That the president, vice president, secretary- 
treasurer, and director of missions shall each 
serve for a term of three years, and shall not 
succeed themselves in office. The director of 
Children's Work is to be appointed by the 
Board of Christian Education. 



Women's Work Organization 



367 



"3. That these officers collectively shall be known 
as the District Council of Women's Work. 

"4. That the council be responsible: (1) for 
arranging for public programs, to be held from 
year to year in connection with District Meet- 
ing, and such other meetings and services as are 
necessary to promote the work. (2) for 
appointing a nominating committee whose duty 
it shall be to nominate persons for offices to be 
filled from year to year. 

"5. That the voting power of this organization be 
vested in the women delegates to the Women's 
Work meeting, sent from the various churches. 
Assuming that the membership of each church 
is one-third women we recommend that each 
church be represented by two delegates for the 
first 50 women or less, and one delegate for 
each additional fifty women. 

"6. In order that all offices do not become vacant at 
the same time, and that our organization may 
become uniform, we further recommend : 

(1) that the president whom we elect at this 
meeting, serve for a period of three years; 

(2) that the vice president and secretary- 
treasurer serve for a period of two years ; 

(3) that the director of missions serve for one 
year. 

"7. That at the expiration of this period, only the 
last three named may succeed themselves in 
office for a period of three years. 
"Respectfully submitted, 
"Mrs. Grace Ziegler, 
"Mrs. C. E. Grapes, 
"Miss Sudie M. Wingert, 
"Mrs. J. W. Whitacre." 
(Passed). 

Copied from District Meeting 
minutes, 1932 : 

The following officers were 
elected : President, Mrs. Grace 
Ziegler, (three years) ; vice presi- 
dent, Miss Margaret Oellig, (two 
years) ; secretary - treasurer, Mrs. 
C. E. Grapes, (two years) ; director 
of missions, Mrs. Harper Snavely, 
(one year). 

It was decided that the officers 
of this meeting should draw up a Mrs . Grace Ziegler , 

resolution pledging our support to First p res ident of 

the preservation of the Eighteenth Women's Work. 




368 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Amendment to the Constitution and that this should be sent to 
the President of the United States and be published in the 
York City papers. 

In the evening we showed pictures of our women at work 
in India, China, and Africa. Mrs. J. W. Whitacre led the 
devotions at this service. A gratifying interest was manifest 
in these meetings. 

The minutes for 1933 are as follows : 

The Woman's Work meeting for 1933 was held in the 
Hade Church, October 24, 2 P.M. Mrs. John Krape as 
chorister; worship service, Mrs. H. M. Snavely; business 
period; special music; talk, "Women's Ministry", Mrs. 
Florence Gibbel, Lititz, Pennsylvania; hymn 713; temperance 
talk, Mrs. D. K. Miller, Mechanicsburg; special music, ladies' 
quartet, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania; "Our National Project", 
Miss Ida Shoemaker; offering; closing meditations, Mrs. J. E. 
Thomas. 

At the business session of this meeting, Mrs. John Krape 
was chosen as director of missions. 

Minutes for 1934 as follows: 

"At two P.M. October 30, 1934, the women of Southern 
District of Pennsylvania convened in Women's Work meeting 
at the Huntsdale Church. The president of the organization 
presided. The first feature of this program was the business 
session, at which time Mrs. T. C. Stambaugh, Mrs. Lydia Gipe, 
and Miss Sudie Snively served as a nominating committee to 
choose persons for vice president and secretary-treasurer. 
Election of officers resulted in choosing: Vice president, Miss 
Ora E. Good, of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, (three years) ; 
secretary-treasurer, Mrs. Bertha Madeira, of York, 
Pennsylvania, (three years). 

"Minutes of the last meeting were read by Mrs. C. E. 
Grapes and accepted by the organization. Mrs. Grace Ziegler 
gave a brief address urging the women to carry on to the best 
of their ability, to meet the goal of our project work. After 
which the following program was rendered with the theme — 
"Christ in the Life of the Home" : Worship service, Mrs. Lydia 
Gipe, York, Pennsylvania ; talk, "A High School Girl's Prob- 
lems", Irene Shuman; talk, "Obligation of the Home as it 
Relates to These Problems", Mrs. J. A. Buffenmyer; special 
music, Ridge Ladies' Chorus ; talk, "The Pagan Home as Com- 
pared with the Christian African Home", Faye Moyer; offer- 
ing ; special music, Chambersburg Chorus ; closing meditations, 
Mrs. Emma Wadsworth ; mizpah benediction." 

Through the efforts of Mrs. Ziegler in the spring of 1935, 
(May), Mrs. Elizabeth Rosenberger Blough visited and 
addressed the mothers and daughters groups of the following 
churches : Waynesboro, Greencastle, Chambersburg, Shippens- 
burg, Carlisle, and Mechanicsburg. The only expense of this 



Women's Work Organization 



369 



effort was Mrs. Blough's fare from Hatfield, Pennsylvania, 
which was cared for by contributions from these churches. 

1935 — Theme, "Christ in the Life of the Church" : On 
Tuesday, October 29, 1935, at 2 P.M. the women of the district 
met for the Women's Work program in the Bunkertown 
Church of the Brethren, Lost Creek Congregation. The 
chorister, Mrs. John Krape, of York, Pennsylvania, led the 
song service, and the devotions were led by Mrs. M. J. 
Brougher. The business period was conducted after the usual 
routine of reports. At this time the vice president, Miss Ora E. 
Good, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, presided, due to the 
vacancy caused by the death of our beloved president, Mrs. 
Grace Ziegler, who, in June of this same year, passed on to 
her reward. This made it necessary to elect a president, and 
Miss Ora Good, vice president, was chosen to that office. An 
election was then held to fill the office of vice president to 
which Mrs. J. I. Thomas, Smithsburg, Maryland, was called. 

A form of resolutions upon the death of Mrs. Ziegler 
were prepared and signed by the Council of Women's Work 
in behalf of the organization. This paper was read and 
approved at this service, then forwarded to her bereft hus- 
band, a copy of which was placed upon the minutes of 
Women's Work secretary record. 

The program continued with special music by the Roth 
Quartette; roll call and responses by District Aid Societies; 
special music, Waynesboro 
(Misses Oiler and Gear- 
hart) ; offering, $21.08; spe- 
cial music, Waynesboro 
(Misses Oiler and Gear- 
hart) ; closing devotions, 
Mrs. C. E. Grapes; receipts 
for the year 1934-1935, 
$341.29. 

1936 — Theme, "Christ 
in the Life of the Com- 
munity". On Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 29, the women of the dis- 
trict met in the Bermudian 
Church at 2 P.M. Song serv- 
ice, led by Mrs. John Krape, 
York, Pennsylvania ; devo- 
tions, Mrs. John E. Rowland ; 
business, reports of secretary 
and treasurer, (at this ses- 
sion the election was held to 
fill the office of director of 
missions, Mrs. John Krape 
having served a term of Mrs. W. L. Widdowson, 

three years ; Mrs. H. M. Director of Children's Work. 




370 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

Snavely, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was chosen to fill the office of 
director of missions; at a previous date, Mrs. W. L. 
Widdowson, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, was chosen to the 
office of director of children's work in the district by the Board 
of Christian Education) ; music, York, Pennsylvania, Ladies' 
Chorus; reading, Lillian Arnold; talk, "Living Outside the 
Home", Mrs. H. M. Snavely; music, the Misses Shearer; 
address, "Work Among the Women in Africa", (missionary) 
Mrs. H. Stover Culp; offering, $17.35; prayer; receipts for 
the year 1935-1936, $266.36. 

1937— Theme, "Christ in the Life of the World". Tues- 
day, October 26, the women of the district met in the Marsh 
Creek Church of the Brethren at 2 P.M. 

Song service, Mrs. John Krape ; devotions, Mrs. Miriam 
Boldosser; special music, Marsh Creek Aid Society. 

Business, reports of the secretary and treasurer. At this 
time two terms of office expire, the secretary-treasurer, and 
vice president. A nominating committee provided names for 
nomination. Mrs. Bertha Madeira was re-elected secretary- 
treasurer and Mrs. J. I. Thomas was re-elected vice president. 

Mrs. H. M. Snavely, Director of Missions, gave a report of 
her work. The mission study books were presented for the 
year's study. 

In May of 1937 five of our groups of women in the district 
enjoyed the high privilege and pleasure of having Mrs. Minnie 
Bright, missionary to China, as their guest speaker at mother 
and daughter meetings. These were Mechanicsburg, Carlisle, 
Waynesboro, Weltys, and York. 

This year six of our congregations were added to our 
group of contributors to the National Project Fund. 

Special music, Miss Keeny; offering, $12.90; closing 
devotions, Mrs. J. I. Thomas; receipts for year, $301.57 
(October 1936-October 1937). 

1938— During the year 1938 the women of the district 
met in the New Fairview Church at 2 P.M. with the following 
program : 

Opening song, "Breathe Upon Us Holy Spirit" ; devotions, 
Mrs. S. S. Blough; opening remarks, by president, Ora E. 
Good ; music and business period ; at this time the president's 
term of three years (after a motion was made and carried that 
the ruling be set aside which provided for the president serv- 
ing only a period of three years) as found in minutes of District 
Meeting, 1931, Rules of Organization; the president was re- 
elected; report of director of missions, Mrs. H. M. Snavely; 
conference items, Mrs. L. K. Zeigler; music; talk, "Our 
Women's Work, Past and Present", Mrs. Eleanor Meritz ; talk, 
"Women and Youth of China", Mrs. I. E. Overholtzer (mis- 
sionary) ; offering amounted to $13.16; total receipts for the 
year, $347.61 (October 1937-October 1938). 



Women's Work Organization 371 

1939 — The women of the district met in the Three 
Springs Church, Perry Coujity. 

Song service, Mrs. J. I. Thomas; opening song, "Fill Me 
Now"; devotions, Mrs. Mervyn Mensch; opening remarks, 
Miss Ora Good ; music, "Come Power of God", Good, Snyder, 
Thomas, Leiter; business, reports of secretary-treasurer read. 

The director of missions term of office expired at this time 
and Mrs. H. M. Snavely was chosen to succeed herself. During 
the year in July our Women's Work Organization was asked 
to supply speakers for the Women's Work periods two days of 
Camp Harmony Adult Assembly. Mrs. L. K. Ziegler and Mrs. 
W. L. Widdowson served on these occasions. 

Remarks by director of missions, Mrs. H. M. Snavely; 
presentation of work for children, Mrs. W. L. Widdowson; 
reports of the work of each church in district ; talk, Mrs. Irene 
Bittinger (missionary to Africa) ; music, "Send the Light", 
(quartette)), Good, Snyder, Thomas, Leiter; offering, $13.79; 
receipts for year, $574.00 (October 1938-October 1939). 

1940 — The women of the district met in the Ridge 
Church, Cumberland County, October 29, at 1 :30 P.M. 

Song service, led by Mrs. Roth ; devotions, Mrs. J. A. 
Buffenmyer; opening remarks, Ora E. Good. 

Business, reading of secretary and treasurer reports. At 
this time we had the election for two officers, Mrs. Mary 
Volland, East Berlin, Pennsylvania, was chosen as vice presi- 
dent to succeed Mrs. J. I. Thomas. Mrs. Ruth Murphy 
Harlacher was chosen as secretary-treasurer to succeed Mrs. 
Bertha Madeira. Each of these out-going officers had very 
faithfully served two terms of office. Names were chosen by 
a nominating committee of three, and voted upon by ballot by 
delegates to this meeting. 

Remarks by the director of missions, Mrs. H. M. Snavely; 
special music, Roth Quintette; talk, "Our Relief Program", 
Mrs. L. K. Ziegler; talk, "Children's Work", Mrs. W. L. 
Widdowson; music, Roth Quintette; address, Mrs. E. K. 
Ziegler (missionary to India), subject, "Our Women's Project 
Working in Relation to Women in India" ; offering and prayer, 
Mrs. J. A. Buffenmyer; closing remarks and benediction, Ora 
E. Good; receipts for the year 1939-1940 (October to 
October), $579.24. 

In July, 1940, the cabinet of Women's Work of Southern 
District of Pennsylvania selected the speakers and subjects for 
five periods of discussion on Women's Work at the Camp 
Harmony Adult Assembly. These speakers were to be chosen 
from the entire area of Pennsylvania, and the following 
persons responded : 

Mrs. George Detweiler, subject, "Our Girls and the Prob- 
lem of Alcohol and Nicotine" ; Mrs. H. B. Heisey, subject, "The 
Daughter and Her Mother" ; Mrs. A. C. Baugher, subject, "Old 
Fashioned Virtues in the Home"; Mrs. Ernest Brumbaugh, 




tO 





T3 




O 




O 




O 




eg 




*H 




O 




to 




to __• 




r-i T3 




s g 




cS 




1— H 




•*|— H 




^ O 




Dk 

r^^ 








~-i u 




fn c3 




C3 i«H 








Q& 




Jh ~ 




3 bo 




SB 


i— 1 


<D 






t— 1 


3 ^> 


fa 


s. R 
•gare 


o 

fa 
fa 




o 


to W 


w 


p^ 


tf 


rt^ 


o 


*H -■ 


£ 


g 


02 


w-§ 


£ 


. a 


H 


^ 


g 


• 


O 


to to" 




• <» 




>>M 




p— 1 




<D . 




> £ 




2^ 




fiis=5 




w . 




. <D 




^ P* 




. *-l 




ffi^ 




Mrs. 
Eliza 




-^ to 




X U 








m * 




O > 

^ O 




-+J &-u 




SH 




<1)X! 




*- c 








o» 




^w. 




+J 




w . 




Sh to 




E g 









rC| 




H 



Women's Work Organization 373 

subject, "Open Discussion and Question Box on Home 
Problems" ; Mrs. J. I. Thomas, subject, "The Touch of His 
Hand". 

The year 1940 brought to the work much suffering, sorrow 
and distress through the war devastation and entanglement in 
the far east. We, the women of the Southern District of Penn- 
sylvania, united to do our bit in helping to relieve the condi- 
tions of suffering and distress among these people, and to effect 
activity along this line, a letter was prepared for the people of 
our district urging them to respond to the call for used and 
new clothing, or money as they deemed wise and prudent. 
This was presented at the district ministerial and Sunday 
school meeting in August, 1940, and an effort was made to get 
it before each of our congregations. 

In response many garments were made and used clothing 
contributed, also contributions of cash. These were sent to 
the Friends Committee store room in Philadelphia to await 
proper distribution. The gifts in money were taken care of 
by the Brethren headquarters at Elgin. 

The foregoing closes the work up to January, 1941. 

P.S. — 1. Each year envelopes are distributed to the various 
churches for the contribution to the National Project 
Fund which is for the education of women and girls 
in the schools of India, Africa, and China. The 
Southern District of Pennsylvania quota to this fund 
being $629.00 each year. 

2. Early in January of each year a letter goes out to each 
church from the District President of Women's Work 
as a recognition and encouragement to each group to 
put forth every effort in helping lift women and girls 
of foreign lands as well as those of our own country, 
and it is our purpose through these efforts to bring to 
them a knowledge of Christ and His saving power 
which is for the entire human family. 

Women's Work 

The following is the amount of money received each year 
since the organization started, from October to October: 

1931 $ 65.00 

1932 254.52 

1933 278.57 

1934 341.29 

1935 266.36 

1936 301.57 

1937 347.61 

1938 574.00 

1939 579.24 

1940 514.39 



374 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



The following officers and terms of office January tp 
January. Elections held in October. 

For President — Mrs. Grace Ziegler served October, 1932, 
to June, 1935 ; Miss Ora E. Good served from January, 1936, 
to January, 1942. 

For Vice President — Miss Margaret Oellig served from 
October, 1932, to October, 1934 ; Miss Ora E, Good served from 
October, 1934, to January, 1936; Mrs. Helen Thomas served 
from January, 1936, to January, 1941; Mrs. Mary Volland 
served from January, 1941, to January, 1944. 

For Secretary-Treasurer — Mrs. C. E. Grapes elected and 
served from October, 1932, to January, 1935 ; Mrs. Bertha 
Madeira served from January, 1935, to January, 1941; Mrs. 
Ruth Murphy Harlacher served from January, 1941, to 
January, 1944. 

The Director of Missions — Mrs. H. M. Snavely served from 
1932 until 1933; Mrs. John Krape served from January, 1934, 
to January, 1937 ; Mrs. H. M. Snavely served from January, 
1937, to January, 1943. 



CHAPTER X 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK IN SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The earliest record of district organization in young 
people's work in the Southern District of Pennsylvania is 
found in well kept minutes in the possession of Lillian Good, 
Waynesboro, the present secretary of the cabinet of the 
Western Zone organization of the district. The record shows 
that on April 20, 1933, Dan West, National Director of Young 
People's Work, met with a group of representatives from the 
young people of some of the surrounding churches (surround- 
ing Waynesboro) and chose Evelyn Benedict, of Waynesboro, 
director of young people's work in the Waynesboro Church, 
as chairman, and asked her to call another meeting. Accord- 
ingly another meeting was called at which a survey of 
possible activities beneficial to young people, was made. The 
group got no further than to agree that directed recreation 
was a need. 

A second meeting was called in Waynesboro June 23, 
1933, by Miss Benedict, young people from Waynesboro, 
Greencastle and Shippensburg being present. At this meet- 
ing the group felt that the most important problem facing 
them was that of becoming conscious of the fact that there was 
a place for them in the program of the church, and of pre- 
paring to fit into it. Plans were made for the first rally where 
these ideas might be stressed. 

On July 9, 1933, another meeting of practically the same 
group was held in Waynesboro in charge of Miss Benedict. 
It was decided : to arrange for a rally at the Ridge Church ; 
to invite all the members of the District Board of Christian 
Education to attend; to notify all the presiding elders and 
pastors of the Cumberland Valley of the rally, and invite them 
to attend. 

The first rally was held at the Ridge Church August 5, 
1933. First, the group numbering eighty-one, met in a grove 
at the home of B. Frank Johns in the afternoon for a period of 
discussion of problems and needs and goals. Two groups 
were formed and were directed in discussion by J. D. Reber, 
then pastor of the Shippensburg Church, and Levi K. Ziegler, 
pastor of the Waynesboro Church. The entire group ioined 
to discuss the findings of the separate groups. Then followed 
a recreation period, lunch and vespers. Jesse Whitacre, then 
pastor of the Greencastle Church, was the vesper speaker. 
The evening session was held in the Ridge Church, in which 



376 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

Levi K. Ziegler gave an address on "How Shall I Invest My 
Life", and officers were elected. 

On August 10, 1933, Miss Benedict called a meeting of 
the officers and adult advisors at her home for the purpose of 
considering the advisability of petitioning the District 
Conference through the District Board of Christian Education 
to approve the new organization and to endorse its purposes. 
This petition was formulated and sent to the District Board of 
Education, but instead of the board sending it on to the con- 
ference it took full responsibility in giving its approval since 
it is responsible for the promotion of young people's work in 
the district. The board therefore wrote the petitioners 
assuring them of its approval and support. 




Elder J. E. Rowland and Wife 
First Director of Young People's Work. 

Subsequent meetings were held in which such matters as 
the length of term of officers, the number of rallies a year, out- 
ings, etc., were discussed. The work is now fully under the 
direction of the District Board of Christian Education through 
the appointed director of young people's work. 

Young people from the churches in the Cumberland 
Valley also during the years following the beginning of organ- 
ized young people's work in the district, participated in a 
young people's leadership institute once a year with the young 
people of the District of Middle Maryland. 

The 1934 District Conference elected J. E. Rowland, then 
pastor of the Mechanicsburg Church, a member of the Board 
of Christian Education. In November of that year, he was 
appointed by the board to serve as district director of young 
people's work under its direction. He continued as such, by 
re-election, until he moved from the district August 28, 1940. 

A geographical study of the district was made by the 
board in order that in the best way possible we might reach 



Young People's Work in Southern Pennsylvania 377 

all of our young people, and solicit their interest and activity 
in this work. As a result the district was divided into three 
zones: the northern zone, to include all churches in Perry, 
Juniata, Snyder, Union, and Clinton Counties; the western 
zone, all churches in Cumberland, Franklin Counties and one 
in Maryland ; the eastern zone all churches in York, Adams 
Counties and some in Maryland. A full core of cabinet officers 
was elected in each zone — president, vice-president, secretary- 
treasurer, and two adult advisors. Each zone set to work and 
held a Y. P. rally, spring and fall, using many of the young 
people in discussion of topics relative to young people, the 
church, Christian living, etc. Frequently we called in a 
speaker from outside of our group. 

These meetings stimulated interest and sentiment, and 
many local churches organized their young people into active 
groups, some doing excellent work. The young people in the 
eastern zone became exceptionally active and beside their 
zone rallies, they held monthly peace conferences, fellowship 
meetings, etc. The young people in York, edited and pub- 
lished regularly a small paper in the interest of young people's 
work. For a number of years the eastern and southern dis- 
tricts cooperated in holding a mid-summer Young People's 
Conference. These meetings were alternate between the two 
districts. However, with a satisfactory understanding, these 
joint meetings were discontinued in the year 1936. 

In the summer of 1937, the young people of the southern 
district held their own mid-summer conference at the Mount 
Olivet camp grounds near Dillsburg. These meetings were 
well attended, and afforded an opportunity for the young 
people of the district to fellowship together, and retain a 
unified spirit and interest. There was a growing sentiment for 
a district cabinet, in conjunction with the zone cabinets, which 
is in keeping with the young peoples organization of the 
church in general. 

After a conference with the zone officers, and the 
approval of the Board of Christian Education, this organiza- 
tion was effected at the mid-summer conference held at 
Dillsburg June 30, 1940. A president, vice-president, secre- 
tary, and treasurer were elected as this cabinet, with one 
representative from each of the zones as additional members. 

From funds accumulated from the rallies, and in public 
meetings, our young people contributed very liberally to the 
Y. P. project of the church, in general, world conferences, 
campers, camp workers, missions, and the Board of Christian 
Education. During this period of time a remarkable spirit of 
activity was developed among the young people, as well as 
much commendable work done. 

The zone officers May, 1941, are: Eastern Zone — Presi- 
dent, Earnest Lefever, York; vice president, Vernon Grim, 
Hanover; secretary, Helen Myers, Hanover; assistant secre- 



373 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

tary, Esther Brant, Dallastown; adult advisers, Obed Frey, of 

New Freedom, and Jacob L. Miller, of York. Western Zone 

President, William Boldosser, Carlisle ; vice president, Kenneth 
Faust, Chambersburg; secretary, Lillian Good, Waynesboro; 
treasurer, Dorothy Becker, Carlisle; adult advisers, Miss 
Margia Fox Henry and Mrs. Madeline Roth, Carlisle. 
Northern Zone — President, Raymond Beers, Oakland Mills; 
vice president, Gladys Shirk, Mifflintown ; secretary, Ruth E. 
Kipp, Newport; treasurer, Vivian Mensch, Mifflinburg; adult 




District Cabinet of Young People 

First row, left to right: Margaret Leas, Vice President; J. Linwood 

Eisenberg, District Director; Mildred Meals, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Second row: Raymond Beers, Northern Zone; Jack Milhorn, Eastern 

Zone; Ernest Lefever, Regional Director, Eastern Zone. 

advisers, Mrs. John Boone, Loganton, and Earl S. Kipp, 
Newport. 

The first district cabinet elected in 1941 consists of: 
Kenneth Monn, Waynesboro; vice president, Margaret Leas, 
York ; secretary-treasurer, Mildred Meals, York ; from Eastern 
Zone, Jack Milhorn, York; Western Zone, Ellis Bard, 
Chambersburg; Northern Zone, Raymond Beers, Oakland 
Mills. 

Kenneth Monn was not able to accept the active presi- 
dency. Margaret Leas is serving in this capacity. 

At District Meeting in October, 1940, J. Linwood 
Eisenberg, of Shippensburg, was elected to the Board of 



Young People's Work in Southern Pennsylvania 379" 

Christian Education. At the meeting of Board of Christian 
Education held at the close of this District Meeting, J. Linwood 
Eisenberg was chosen by the board as district director of young 
people's work. 



I i ', 



CHAPTER XI 



EDUCATION 



BOARD OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The present Board of Christian Education was created 
by District Meeting in 1924 under the name of "Sunday School 
Board". It consisted at first of five elected members plus the 
district Sunday school secretary and district Sunday school 
treasurer, making seven members in all. The name in 1928 
was changed to "Board of Religious Education", and to the 
"Board of Christian Education" in 1932. 

For a number of years, the chief work of this board was 
the conducting of young people's conferences jointly with 
Eastern Pennsylvania, the first of which was held July 26, 
1924, in the Salunga Church of Eastern Pennsylvania; as well 
as conducting young people's conferences of our own district. 

Later on the work of social purity, and temperance was 
assigned to the board. 

In 1930 the board was granted the privilege to arrange 
for the evening program on the evening of the ministerial 
meeting. This practice has still continued until the present 
time. 

Southern District of Pennsylvania was divided into three 
zones, viz : northern, eastern, and western, for the purpose of 
more adequately caring for young people's work, children's 
work, and Christian education. 

This work has been especially stressed since 1935. 

The board published in 1937, "Studies in the Doctrine of 
Peace" through the General Board of Christian Education at 
Elgin. The general board did this service free for our board 
upon condition that the General Board of Christian Education 
might use this work throughout the entire Brotherhood. 

CoDies of these booklets were furnished free to the young 
people of our district who desired them. 

The organization and duties of the board adopted in 1934 
are as follows : 

1. That the office of District Sunday School Secre- 
tary be discontinued. 

2. That the office of District Sunday School Treas- 
urer be discontinued, and that his duties be 




Board of Christian Education 

Upper: C. B. Sollenberger, Director of Christian Education; J. Linwood 

Eisenberg, Director of Young People's Work. Center: Levi K. Ziegler, 

Chairman. Lower: N. S. Sellers, Secretary; E. E. Baugher, Treasurer. 



382 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

merged with those of the Treasurer of the 
District Board of Christian Education. 

3. That the District Board of Christian Education 
consist of five members instead of seven. 

4. That the term of office of all members of the 
present Board expires upon the passage of this 
paper. 

5. That the District Conference of 1934 elect a 
District Board of Christian Education, electing 
two members for three years, two members for 
two years, and one member for one year. There- 
after, all members of the Board shall be regu- 
larly elected by the District Conference for a 
term of three years. 

6. That joint Young People's Work with the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania be continued. 
A portion of any deficit arising from the conduct 
of the Young People's Conferences at Elizabeth- 
town College from year to year, shall be paid 
by Southern Pennsylvania in proportion to the 
number of young people enrolled in the Confer- 
ences from Southern Pennsylvania. In all other 
joint activities Southern Pennsylvania shall share 
to the extent of one-half of the expenses and 
one-half of the net receipts. 

7. That for the present the Congregations of the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania be grouped 
into three geographical zones for convenience 
in carrying forward organized Young People's 
Work, promoting Children's Work by the 
Director of Children's Work, and for the promo- 
tion of such other projects as the Board of Chris- 
tian Education may from time to time desire to 
undertake. The following zoning is in effect: 
Northern — Buffalo, Lost Creek, Mount Olivet, 
Perry, Sugar Valley; Eastern — Codorus, Upper 
Conewago, York, New Fairview, Pleasant Hill, 
Upper Codorus, Madison Avenue, Hanover, 
Lower Conewago, Marsh Creek ; Western — 
Carlisle, Chambersburg, Falling Spring, Green- 
castle, Huntsdale, Mechanicsburg, Lower 
Cumberland, Boiling Springs, Newville, Ridge, 
Shippensburg, Waynesboro, Antietam, Back 
Creek and Welty. 

8. That any former decisions in conflict with the 
above recommendations shall upon their 
adoption be repealed. 

(The first joint Young People's Meeting of Southern and 
Eastern Pennsylvania was held on July 26, 1924, in the 
Salunga Church of the Eastern District.) 



Education 383 

RELATION OF WAYNESBORO, PENNSYLVANIA, AND 

VICINITY TO JUNIATA COLLEGE 

With the exception of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, there 
was probably no community more closely associated with 
"Huntingdon Normal School' 7 (now Juniata College) from its 
beginning than Waynesboro and vicinity. The Brumbaughs 
(J. B., H. B., and Dr. A. B.) who financed the school, were 
intimate friends of Jacob F. Oiler, of Waynesboro, Pennsyl- 
vania, and they considered locating the school in this vicinity 
by buying the Clairmont Hotel which was a short distance east 
of Monterey and converting it into a school building. 

In the early 1870's Jacob Zuck, a native of Franklin 
County, who became the first principal of the Huntingdon 
Normal was a teacher in the public school of Waynesboro, 
Pennsylvania. After the close of the first or experimental 
term of the normal school he came to Waynesboro, seeking his 
friend and kinsman, David Emmert, of Benevola, Maryland, 
who was working in a pattern shop here and who was 
Professor Zuck's roommate while in Waynesboro. On account 
of home duties Mr. Emmert could not at that time respond to 
the call to "come over and help us". The following year, how- 
ever, (fall of 1877) he joined the faculty of the school, as the 
teacher of art. 

In November, 1878, when the Brethren's Normal College 
was chartered, Jacob F. Oiler, of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, 
and D. F. Stouffer, of Benevola, Maryland, were among the 
trustees. Mr. Oiler remained a trustee until his death in 1897. 
He was succeeded in the trusteeship by his son, J. J. Oiler 
(1898-1936). Mr. Stouffer was succeeded by his daughter, 
Miss Jennie, (who later became Mrs. W. M. Newcomer), who 
served until her death in 1938. Mr. Oiler's granddaughter, 
Miss Bessie Rohrer, has been a trustee since 1923. 

During the years when Juniata had a special four weeks' 
session of Bible study Mr. Jacob F. Oiler was a regular attend- 
ant and always took with him a group from his own church. 
(In the winter of 1896 there were 22 in the group.) Mr. J. J. 
Oiler was a liberal contributor to the college. His daughter, 
Miss Rello, donated the pipe organ for the new auditorium, 
(1940). In recognition of the interest and generosity of the 
Oiler family the auditorium has been named Oiler Hall. 

From its organization Waynesboro and vicinity has been 
well represented each year among the students of Juniata. 
Some of these have gone forth in service in home and foreign 
lands, while others have returned to their own home congrega- 
tions. Today a large percentage of the workers of the Waynes- 
boro Congregation are ex-students or benefactors of the 
college. 

Annual Juniata College reunions have been held by the 
Waynesboro people since 1899. The first few were held in 




Founders Hall, Juniata College 



Education 385 

Waynesboro on the lawn of Mr. S. E. Dubbel (son-in-law of 
Mr. Jacob F. Oiler). For more than twenty years they were 
held at Pen-Mar Park. Since 1922 they have been held in 
Waynesboro in the form of a banquet. 

At the suggestion of Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh, then president 
of Juniata College, the first women's league of the school was 
organized in Waynesboro in April, 1928 — named the Women's 
Fellowship League of Juniata College. 

The Oiler family continues the interest in Juniata College. 
The following is a quotation from Juniata Alumni Bulletin in 
1940 : "Oiler is a name which has run a course parallel with 
the development of Juniata College since its founding in 1876. 
Jacob F. Oiler, of Waynesboro, an elder of the Brethren 
Church, was one of the incorporators and a member of the 
first board of trustees of the college. His children were all 
active in the development of the college. 

"The fourth child of Jacob and Elizabeth Bonebrake 
Oiler, Joseph J., was very well known on College Hill for many 
years. The greatest financial benefactor of Juniata, he also 
endeared himself to all who knew him here by his unfailing 
eagerness to give of his time, his thought, and his effort. 
J. J. Oiler was a keen, upright business man, a sincere church 
worker and a lover of life lived wholesomely. He found time 
in his busy life for frequent visits to Juniata's campus, often 
accompanied by Mrs. Oiler. His death on September 3, 1936, 
and the death of his wife two years later, were occasions of 
great sorrow to the entire college. Yet Juniata was not com- 
pletely bereaved, for their memory is well perpetuated by 
those who remain to carry on the Oiler name and benefactions. 

"So, if we should omit all other respectful mention of J. J. 
and Myrtle Oiler, we would be justified in paying tribute to 
them for their three interesting children, Rello, J. F., and Jack. 

"Naturally the Oiler children came to Juniata. Rello 
developed her musical ability and graduated in 1920. Both of 
the boys, J. F., '18AB, and Jack, '23AB, whom alumni may 
remember as rooming in Students and Founders Hall respec- 
tively, were outstanding in athletics. J. F. earned letters in 
basketball, track, and tennis, and is still holder of the record 
for the 220-yard dash. Jack, with the same amateur 
enthusiasm, was a four-letterman in football, basketball, 
baseball and track. 

"Each of the three Oiler children has now found his own 
niche in world affairs and each has found there some real life 
values. Rello, living at the family residence in Waynesboro, 
is still absorbed in her ardent pursuit of musical worth ; besides 
singing in her home church choir and quartet, she is a member 
of the Cumberland Valley Choristers and enjoys drawing 
upon her talent for the services of many churches of this 
region. Her devotion to the church embraces more than 
sacred music, her Christian activities especially benefitting 



386 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

young people. J. F., as executor of his father's estate, con- 
tinues in some of the latter's interests. He is a lover of books 
and has read extensively in many fields. He enjoys pho- 
tography and golf as hobbies. His keen knowledge of our 
country comes from traveling, sometimes by foot, through 
most of the States of the Union. 

"Perhaps, of the three, Jack is the most closely and per- 
sonally connected with the college. After a three-year in- 
terval during which he taught French at Patton High School 
and earned his M.A. degree at Pennsylvania State College, he 
returned to Juniata College as a faculty member in the French 
Department. Taking periodical leaves of absence, he has 
studied further at Penn State, and, because his interest in 
French is not purely academic, he has derived much pleasure 
from studying the life of the French people, as well as their 
language, in France. Abroad seven times, he has toured 
Europe as widely as his brother has the United States although 
he and his brother have both invaded each other's realms 
occasionally. Mr. Jack Oiler is an active member of the 
Huntingdon Rotary Club, and at present is chairman of the 
Athletic Board of Juniata College. His personal interest in 
sports includes golf, horseback riding, and skiing. As a skiing 
enthusiast, he takes great pleasure in the sport for several 
weeks each winter. 

"The college is justly proud of such valuable and versatile 
members of the Juniata 'family'. For their large part in 
making Juniata College what it is, we proffer them a hearty 
vote of thanks and enthusiastically dedicate this page to 
them." 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE AND ITS RELATION TO 

SOUTHERN PENNSYLVANIA 

At the close of the last century a number of the members 
of the Church of the Brethren in Eastern Pennsylvania felt that 
their children should have the opportunity of receiving an 
education under the direct influence of the church. The 
opinion was expressed that teachers and prospective ministers 
were being trained in colleges that were departing from the 
faith as held by the leaders of the church and in this manner 
creating a hazard to the future welfare of the church and to 
her best interests. When the charter of the new institution 
was formulated the purpose of the college was set forth in 
these words : "To give such harmonious development to the 
physical, mental, and moral powers of both sexes as will best 
fit them for the duties of life and promote their spiritual 
interests." Although the college was primarily founded to 
provide the youth of the Church of the Brethren with oppor- 



Education 387 

tunities for obtaining a Christian education, members of other 
churches and also non-Christians of good moral character 
were invited to share these advantages. 

From the very beginning of the movement a native son 
of York County was in the front ranks. Elder G. N. 
Falkenstein, born in the Codorus Congregation and then re- 
siding at Germantown, Philadelphia, was present at the first 
three public meetings held to consider the establishment of a 
college in Eastern Pennsylvania, and it is to his carefully kept 
diary that we are indebted today for many details of the 
founding of Elizabethtown College. 

The first meeting to consider the matter of a college of 
the Church of the Brethren in Eastern Pennsylvania was called 
at Reading, on November 29, 1898. Elder G. N. Falkenstein 
was secretary of the meeting which after considerable dis- 
cussion appointed the following committee on location : Elder 
John Herr, Myerstown, Pennsylvania, chairman; Elder G. N. 
Falkenstein, Germantown, Pennsylvania, secretary ; Elder 
J. H. Longenecker, Palmyra, Pennsylvania ; Elder H. E. Light, 
Mountville, Pennsylvania; Mr. Elias B. Lefever, Ephrata, 
Pennsylvania. Elder John Herr resigned shortly after the 
meeting and Elder S. H. Hertzler, Elizabethtown, Pennsyl- 
vania, was substituted by the committee for Elder John Herr. 

The second public meeting to discuss the project was held 
at Elizabethtown on April 5, 1899. The officers of this meet- 
ing were : Chairman, Elder S. R. Zug, Elizabethtown, Pennsyl- 
vania ; secretary, Elder G. N. Falkenstein, Germantown, 
Pennsylvania ; treasurer, Elder S. H. Hertzler, Elizabethtown, 
Pennsylvania. It was at this meeting that Elder G. N. 
Falkenstein moved "that we establish a school of such a char- 
acter that compares favorably with any of our schools 
including Bible, academic, and collegiate departments". The 
motion prevailed and a committee of ten was appointed to 
locate the college and to draft a constitution and by-laws. 
The officers of this new locating committee were : Chairman, 
Elder H. E. Light, Mountville, Pennsylvania; secretary, Elder 
G. N. Falkenstein, Germantown, Pennsylvania; treasurer, 
Elder S. H. Hertzler. This committee met on May 24, 1899, at 
Roanoke, Virginia, during the Annual Meeting held there. 
Elizabethtown was selected as the site for the college. A sub- 
committee of three was appointed to draft a constitution and 
by-laws : Elder G. N. Falkenstein, Mr. J. G. Francis, and Elder 
Jesse Ziegler. The name suggested for the institution was 
Conestoga College. At a meeting of the locating committee 
on June 6, 1899, the site for the college was challenged. 
Mack College and East Penn College were other names pro- 
posed, but the locating committee finally agreed on Conestoga 

College. 

Then followed the third public meeting at Elizabethtown 
on June 7, 1899. At this meeting the new institution was at 



388 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

last named Elizabethtown College and the constitution and 
by-laws were adopted. Nine trustees were elected as follows* 
For three years— Elder G. N. Falkenstem, Germantown, 
Pennsylvania ; Elder Jesse Ziegler, Royersf ord, Pennsylvania ; 
and Elder S. H. Hertzler, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania. For 
two years— Mr. J. H. Rider, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania ; 
Mr. Nathan Hoffman, Pottstown, Pennsylvania ; and Mr. M. R. 
Henry, Palmyra, Pennsylvania. For one year — Mr. P. C. Nyce, 
Reading, Pennsylvania ; Elder T. F. Imier, Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania ; and Elder L. R. Brumbaugh, Ridgely, Maryland. The 
board effected the following organization: President, Elder 
Jesse Ziegler; vice president, Elder T. F. Imler; secretary, 
Elder G. N. Falkenstein; and treasurer, Elder S. H. Hertzler. 

On August 16, 1900, Elder T. F. Imler resigned his office 
and Mr. J. H. Rider was selected to be vice president. 

A charter was secured from the Court of Common Pleas 
of Lancaster County on September 23, 1899, and ground was 
broken for the first building on July 10, 1900. 

During the summer of 1900 a sixteen-page catalogue with 
blue covers announced the opening of Elizabethtown College. 
The first principal elected was Elder I. N. H. Beahm, but on 
account of illness he could not assume his duties. On opening 
day three teachers were present : Elder G. N. Falkenstein, who 
served as principal and teacher of sciences, civil government, 
history, and classics; Miss Elizabeth Myer, teacher of 
mathematics, elocution, and English; and Mr. J. A. Seese, 
teacher of commercial subjects and mathematics. Six male 
students presented themselves for admission. The first male 
student to enroll was Mr. Kurwin David Henry, of Big Mount, 
York County, now a minister in the Lower Conewago Congre- 
gation and residing near Thomasville, York County, Pennsyl- 
vania. The college opened on November 13, 1900, in the 
Heisey Auditorium in Elizabethtown, then moved to the par- 
sonage of the Church of the Brethren, and finally to Alpha 
Hall, the first building on the campus, on January 2, 1901. 
Dedicatory exercises were held on March 4, 1901. 

The catalogue for the second year contained the names 
of two new factulty members from Southern Pennsylvania: 
Elder J. H. Keller, and Mr. Clayton Weaver, both of York 
County. The former was scheduled to teach penmanship, 
bookkeeping and music ; the latter, history, mathematics, and 
Latin. Elder I. N. H. Beahm being physically unable to per- 
form his duties as principal, Elder G. N. Falkenstein entered 
upon the second year as principal of the college and continued 
in this office until Dr. D. C. Reber was elected principal in the 
fall of 1903. 

Other faculty members from Southern Pennsylvania 
were: Mrs. Luella Fogelsanger Breitigan, Mrs. Margaret 
Haas Schwenk, and Miss Mary Elizabeth Miller, of Cumber- 
land County; Mr. Earl Eshleman, Miss Kathryn Miller, 




w 



'■ 



cr> 

- 
O 

U 
o 

H 

W 

H 
H 

03 
< 
S3 

i— i 

w 



390 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 







Dr. R. W. Schlosser, 

Former President of College and 
Writer of Sketch. 



Dr. Laban Leiter, a former 
dean of the college ; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. H. Fries, Miss Lore 
Brenisholtz, Mrs. Helen Oellig 
Thomas, Mrs. Mildred Bone- 
brake Harshman, and Mrs. 
Emma Cashman Wadsworth, 
of Franklin County; Dr. C. E. 
Resser, Dr. A. C. Baugher, a 
former dean of the college 
and now president; Dr. J. I. 
Baugher, and Mr. Daniel 
Myers, of York County; and 
Mrs. Supera Martz Boone, of 
Clinton County. 

The ownership of the 
college was transferred on 
April 26, 1917, from the pri- 
vate donors to the Church of 
the Brethren of the Eastern 
District of Pennsylvania and 
such other districts that 
should decide to share in the 
ownership and control of the college. Only the Southern Dis- 
trict of Pennsylvania voted to share in the operation of the 
college. This action was taken in their District Meeting held 
on October 30, 1919. The new charter called for eight trustees 
from Eastern Pennsylvania and four from Southern Pennsyl- 
vania. They assumed control on January 1, 1919. 

Prior to the above transfer there were two trustees from 
Southern Pennsylvania who were elected by the donors. 
They were Elder J. H. Keller, of Shrewsbury, elected in 1910, 
and Elder C. R. Oellig, of Waynesboro, elected in 1914. The 
first four trustees from Southern Pennsylvania to represent 
the district were Elder J. H. Keller, Elder C. R. Oellig, Elder 
C. L. Baker, and Elder A. S. Baugher. The complete list of 
trustees from Southern Pennsylvania follows: 

Elected Name Address End of Term 

1910__Elder J. H. Keller, Shrewsbury, Pa 1928 

1914__Elder C. R. Oellig, Waynesboro, Pa 1939 

1919__Elder C. L. Baker, East Berlin, Pa 1935 

Vice-President, 1919-1935 

1919__Elder A. A. Baugher, Lineboro, Md 1938 

1928__Elder G. W. Harlacher, Dover, Pa 1931 

1931 — Elder C. E. Grapes, Greencastle, Pa In office 

Served 1931-1937. Re-elected 1938 

1933__Mr. G. A. W. Stouffer, Chambersburg, Pa 1940 

1935__Elder N. S. Sellers, Lineboro, Md In office 






Education 391 

Elected Name Address End of Term 

1937__Elder J. E. Trimmer, Carlisle, Pa In office 

Vice President since 1935 

1939__Elder G. Howard Danner, Abbottstown, Pa.__In office 

1940__Elder Walter A. Keeny, Gettysburg, Pa In office 

It was in 1931 that the board of trustees was increased 
from twelve to fourteen by having the alumni of the college 
elect two trustees. Thus far one of these two has been selected 
from Southern Pennsylvania. The first trustee from Southern 
Pennsylvania to be elected by the alumni association was Mr. 
G. A. W. Stouffer, of Chambersburg, in 1933. He served until 
1940. The second person to be elected by the alumni was 
Elder Walter A. Keeny, of Gettysburg. 

In 1940 both districts approved the plan of enlarging the 
board of trustees from fourteen to twenty-four, but at this 
writing the charter has not yet been amended by the court and 
consequently the additional trustees have not been elected. 
According to the new plan the board will be constituted as 
follows : Eight elected by the District of Eastern Pennsylvania, 
four elected by the District of Southern Pennsylvania, eight 
to be elected by the board of trustees of the college, three to 
be elected by the alumni association, the president of the 
college a member ex-officio. 

The alumni of Southern Pennsylvania are holding 
responsible positions as high school teachers, elementary 
school teachers, business men, ministers, and in other 
vocations. At present York County is the most fruitful field 
for prospective students. Many congregations of Southern 
Pennsylvania have ministers, Sunday school teachers, and 
young people's leaders who received their training at 
Elizabethtown College. It is hoped that the college may ful- 
fill the purpose of its founders in the lives of many more sons 
and daughters from the Southern District of Pennsylvania. 



CHAPTER XII 



ANNUAL MEETINGS 

From the History of the Church of the Brethren of 
Eastern Pennsylvania, P. 547, 555, and from the Brethren 
Almanac 1914, P. 32 and 33, we find that Annual Meetings 
have been held in the Southern District seventeen times as 

follows : 

May 30, 1779 — Conewago Congregation, York 

County. 
May 15, 1785 — Big Conewago Congregation, York 

County. 

1793 — Conewago Congregation, York 
County. 
May 26, 1798 — Little Conewago (now Upper 

Codorus) Congregation, York 
County. 
May 30, 1810 — Antietam Church, Franklin County. 

1819 — Isaac Latshaw, Big Conewago Con- 
gregation, Adams County. 
*1824 — Daniel Mohler, Cumberland 
County. 

1828 — John Gungle (Kunkle), Big Cone- 
wago Congregation, York County. 

1829 — George Royer (deacon), Antietam 
Congregation. 

1833 — Peter Schellenberger, near Eden- 
ville, Juniata County, Lost Creek 
Congregation. 

1835 — Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

1836 — Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

1844 — Peter Dierdorff, Big Conewago 
Congregation. 

1847 — Isaac Deardorff (deacon), Antie- 
tam (now Falling Spring Congrega- 
tion. 

1866 — Jacob Price (deacon), Antietam 
Congregation. 

1885 — Michal Bashore, Mexico, Juniata 
County, Lost Creek Congregation. 

1912 — Fair Ground, York. 

*The History of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and the Brethren Almanac of 1914 give 
the place for the meeting of 1825 as D. Mohler, Cumberland County, but the Annual 
Meeting Minutes, Article 7, of that year imply that it was held in Morrison s Caye, Penn- 
sylvania, and the History of Middle Pennsylvania states that it was held in the Yellow 
Creek (now New Enterprise) Congregation which is in Morrison Cove. 






Annual Meetings 393 

The means of transportation to these earlier meetings was 
by foot and horseback. People travelled long distances in this 
way. It is known that women rode on horses from Ohio to a 
conference in Eastern Pennsylvania — a distance of 300 miles. 

The attendance at the Annual Meetings increased with 
the years. One can judge somewhat of the increase by com- 
paring the amount of meat used to feed the people. Of the 
four meetings held in the Antietam Congregation, D. H. 
Fahrney — a local historian — noted that the meat used in 1810 
was one sheep, in 1829 one ox, in 1847 four or five oxen, and 
in 1866 fourteen or fifteen steers. 

The congregation in which the meeting was held was host 
to the visitors and bore the expense of entertaining those who 
went to the meeting. This became rather burdensome with 
the increased attendance following the improvement of the 
mode of transportation. At the conference of 1885 a decision 
was made to locate the meeting near the railroad and that a 
uniform fee of 25 cents per meal be made but that lodging 
should continue to be provided free in the homes and barns. 
At some meetings previous to that a charge had been made 
for meals which was not satisfactory (was indeed an offense) 
to some of the more conservative members. 

The following excerpts and notes concerning the meeting 
of 1866 may be of interest: 

Excerpts from Account of Annual Meeting in Gospel 

Visitor— 1866 (Page 183-185) 

"On Sabbath about 5,000 persons partook of dinner. (It 
is estimated that 15,000 people were in attendance.) It is 
probable that the expenses of the meeting will exceed those 3f 
any meeting of the kind ever held by the brethren. But the 
brethren in that part of the brotherhood in which the meeting 
was held are abundantly able and no doubt sufficiently willing 
to bear the expenses cheerfully. " 

Daniel H. Fahrney, a historian of Antietam Congregation, 
said that the expense of this meeting was around $4,700.00. 

"There was considerable preaching and the demand was 
greater than could be supplied. " 

"In the multitude assembled on the Lord's day and who 
took dinner with us were Governor Curtin and his Secretary 
of State, Mr. McClure. Governor Curtin and other official men 
in our government have put our brethren under obligation to 
them for taking an interest in us as non-combatants during the 
war, and in extending to us whatever favors our non-resistant 
principles entitled us to under the different departments of 
our government. It is very proper that we should respect 
these men." 

"We were also visited by C. A. Buckbee and R. H. Austin, 
agents of the American Bible Union. They delivered short 



394 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



'."■: ■■. . . . ■. . ... .. .'■-, .■ . ■/ ....■:■ :■:■ ■;■ ■ ■ :■. ■....:. 



. 




Home of Jacob Price, Near Waynesboro 
Annual Meeting Held Here in 1866. 

addresses on the necessity of a revision of the English Bible. 
A number of copies of the 'English New Testament Revised' 
were subscribed for by the brethren." 

"The committee (14 members) appointed by the last 
Annual Meeting to suggest a change in the manner of holding 
Annual Meetings met on Thursday evening, May 17, at the 
home of Brother Joseph Rohrer about 10 miles from the place 
where Annual Meeting was held. Excellent accommodations 
and entertainment were enjoyed in this Christian family by 
the committee. Here nearly two days were spent in prayerful 
deliberation upon the business entrusted to the committee. " 

Signed, 

J. Q. (James Quinter). 



Notes Taken by D. F. Good, Chairman, of the Committee of 
Arrangements for the Annual Meeting of 1866 

First meeting held at the home of Jacob Price on 
January 4. 

Object of the meeting: To view the ground and make 
some preliminary arrangements. 

The committee unanimously agree that the proposed 
ground for holding the meeting is well calculated for the pur- 
pose, and recommend to the church to accept the kind offer 



Annual Meetings 395 

made by Brother and Sister Price of their premises for holding 
said meeting. 

The committee then proposed an adjournment, to meet 
again on the 1st day of February at the home of Brother 
J. Friedley. Ten present. 

On the 8th of January the recommendation of the 
committee was submitted to the church and accepted. 

According to the appointment the committee met at the 
house of Brother Jacob Friedley on the 1st day of February. 

The meeting organized by electing Brother B. Price, 
chairman, and Brother J. Stoner, treasurer. 

The following were appointed to procure things necessary 
for the meeting to the best advantage of the church : 

B. Price and D. Bonebrak, 8,000 pounds beef; J. F. Oiler, 
3,200 pounds flour, two sacks coffee, 2,800 feet twine, 2,400 
feet rope, 1,700 yards muslin, 900 pounds butter, 100 gallons 
apple butter, 120 pounds sugar, 230 pounds coffee ; W. Shilling 
and J. Friedley, 13,000 pounds bread ; A. Golly and D. F. Good, 
tent arrangement; J. Holsinger and S. Bock, cooking tent. 

February 19th the committee met with the church to 
make further arrangements for A. M. Proceeded to appoint 
a committee of managers. J. P. Stover and A. Kaufman were 
appointed as principals. Sub-managers, Jacob Hess, Samuel 
Small, A. Lookabaugh, W. Stull and Josiah Berger. Proceeded 
to make arrangements for funds : a subscription was taken up 
for said end and every brother and sister to be solicited to 
make a voluntary contribution. 

Committee meets at the church March 21st. 

1. Proposition of Joseph Middour for killing 
beeves: kill the beeves; render the tallow; put 
hides to tanners ; deliver meat on the ground 
according to order; fetch the cattle, all for $5.00 
per head. 

2. A. Price allowed to sell feed for horses on his 
premises. 

3. Brethren to be allowed to present to the com- 
mittee their bills for horse feed and meals to 
strangers and brethren. 

4. All persons to eat at the tent as much as possible. 
Work to be done by poor sisters and paid for by 
the church. 

5. J. Mong allowed to sell pies and bread at the 
cooking tent. 

6. E. Stover and J. R. — allowed an eating 

tent at the Nunnery Mill. No strong drinks. 

7. First provision for visitors at the tent on Friday 
afternoon. 

Tent to be erected May 4th. Size of tent, 190 feet long, 
90 feet wide. Size of cooking tent, 32 feet long, 20 feet wide. 
Six kettles, two copper and four iron kettles. 



396 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

May 7th, committee met at the church to make final 
arrangements. 

1. Flour to be gotten of Mr. Flegle at $11.00 per 
barrel ; extra to be returned. 

2. Apple butter to be brought in crocks or to be 
reheated. That brought in crocks is to be sub- 
mitted to the committee to judge quality. 

3. Apple butter, pickles, ham, coffee and every- 
thing intended otherwise for the meeting, to be 
brought into camp on Thursday afternoon or 
Friday morning. 

4. Salt, pepper, mild, light, etc., to be gotten by 
sundry persons appointed. 

5. Three additional managers appointed, viz : 
Joseph Garver, Jacob Adams and C. Shockey. 

6. Door keepers, viz: Samuel Rinehart, Jacob 
Snowberger, Jacob Deardorf. 

7. Brethren appointed to wait on tables. (See list.) 

8. To meet at camp on the 9th to further prepara- 
tions for the meeting. 

9. Cooks appointed — Principals, Sisters Elizabeth 
Weddle, Sally Brown and Mary Pence. Others, 
Catharine Wetzel, Mrs. Wilt, Mrs. Peterson, Mrs. 
J. Wilt, Eliza Hagar, Mrs. Goff, Mrs. Weight, 
Rebecca Bock, Sister Christiana Hoover, Henry 
Wilt and James Bolt. 

List of Managers — A. Cauffman, J. P. 
Stover, principals; J. Hess, Samuel Small, Adam 
Lookabaugh, Will Stull, Josiah Berger, Joseph 
Garver, Abraham Adams, George Ilgenfretz. 

Door Keepers — Samuel Rinehart, Jacob 
Snowberger, Jacob Deardorf, C. Shockey, John 
Heller, John Price, John Bender, C. Boyer (or 
Royer), John Jacobs, Daniel Baker. 

Some Problems Considered at Meetings Held in Our District 

(From Annual Meeting Minutes) 
1779 — On account of taking the attest, it has been con- 
cluded in union as follows : "Inasmuch as it is the Lord our 
God who establishes kings and removes kings, and ordains 
rulers according to His own good pleasure, and we cannot 
know whether God has rejected the king and chosen the state, 
while the king had the government; therefore we could not, 
with a good conscience, repudiate the king and give allegiance 

to the state. . 

1785 ARTICLE I. Our cordial and united wish and 

greeting of love and peace to the beloved members, brethren 
and sisters on South Branch, especially to the loving brethren, 
Valentine Power and Martin Power, and all the members m 



n 



Annual Meetings 397 



your vicinity. We wish you all much grace and peace from 
God the Father through Jesus Christ His dear Son, to be faith- 
ful to Him from the bottom of the heart, according to the 
guidance and direction of His holy and good spirit, even unto 
a blessed and God-pleasing end. Amen. Inasmuch as we 
have in part seen, and also heard, that there has arisen some 
difference in several doctrines among some brethren of your 
church and others, and having also seen the letter of the loving 
brother, Valentine Power, which he has written to the big 
meeting, and heard from it his views about "carrying on war", 
which are to be proved especially from the words of Peter 
(1st Peter 2:13-14), so we have considered and weighed the 
matter in union, and we trust in the fear of the Lord ; but yet, 
for the sake of the word of God, we could not agree with such 
view, because we do not see it so, and do not understand so 
the loving Peter in that self-same chapter, nor in his other dis- 
courses ; but God grant that we may be directed according to 
his good pleasure .... 

So we hope the dear brother will not take it amiss when 
we, from all these passages of scripture, and especially from 
the words of Peter, cannot see or find any liberty to use any 
(carnal) sword, but only the sword of the spirit, which is the 
word of God, by which we cast down imaginations and every 
high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, 
and bring into captivity every thought to the obedience of 
Christ .... The sword belongeth to the kingdom of the 
world, and Christ says to His disciples : "I have chosen you 
from the world", etc. Thus we understand the beloved Peter, 
that we are to submit ourselves in all things that are not con- 
trary to the will or command of God, and no further. 

And as to the swearing of oaths, we believe the word of 
Christ, that in all things which we are to testify, we shall 
testify what is yea, or what is true with yea, and what is nay, 
or not true with nay ; for whatsoever is more than this cometh 
of evil .... 

ARTICLE II. It was discussed and unanimously con- 
sidered, that no brother should permit his sons to go on the 
muster ground, much less that a brother go himself. 

1819 — ARTICLE IV. Whether a member is permitted to 
marry without counsel of the church, and without publishing 
the bans? Answer: We know that all who have entered into 
the covenant of grace have promised also to receive counsel, 
and it seems to us, in such an important matter as marriage is, 
we should by all means seek counsel of our fellow believers. 
And concerning the publishings of bans, it is our loving 
counsel, and daily experience teaches us, that it is very good 
to hold to a good order, inasmuch by publishing the bans many 
an accusation is cut off, while on the other hand much decep- 
tion is prevented, which would have free course without the 
bans. 



398 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 





Isaac Latshaw Farm, Big Conewago 
Annual Meeting 1819. 

1828— ARTICLE XI. Whether brethren may have car- 
pets in their houses? It was considered, that it cannot and 
should not be, because it leads to elevation (pride). 

1833— ARTICLE III. Whether a brother who was 
chosen to the (ministry of the) word in one church, and moves 




', -■ 



""""jSpasa 




George Royer Home in Antietam Congregation 
Annual Meeting Was Held Here in 1829. 



Annual Meetings 



399 



into another with a good testimony, can be relieved from his 
office (or rather literally put back from it) ? It was always 
considered, when a ministering brother moves out of the 
church which chose him, he moves out of his office — that is, 
before he is fully ordained ; and that it was at the option of 
the church into which he moves to receive him with his office 
or not. If his life and conduct inspire love and confidence, it 
will not be long before he may be called to exercise his ministry 
again. Have patience ! 

1835 — ARTICLE XI. What is the order to receive appli- 
cants for baptism ? It is necessary that there should be self- 
knowledge, repentance, and faith, together with Scriptural 
instruction, and then that it may be done with the counsel of 
the church. 

1836 — ARTICLE IV. How is it deemed best at the yearly 
meeting, whether first to hold council, or first public meeting 
and communion? It was considered as expedient, to com- 
mence on the Lord's Day with public meeting, and in the eve- 
ning to break the bread of communion, and afterward to hold 
council. 

1844 — At the yearly meeting of the brethren, sometimes 
called German Baptists, held in the house of Brother Peter 
DeardorfF, on Big Conewago, in York County, Pennsylvania, 
on Friday and Saturday before Pentecost, May 24 and 25, 
A.D. 1844, three brethren from Ohio, four from Pennsylvania, 



..:■.■ ' :■ : ■ 








Peter Dierdorff Farm, Big Conewago 
Annual Meeting 1844. 



400 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

three from Virginia and two from Maryland, were chosen as 
a committee and the following points and queries were laid 
before, and considered by them, in the fear of the Lord, in 
public council meeting: .... 

ARTICLE V. About singing in different voices, at public 
meetings, considered that the singing of psalms, hymns, and 
spiritual songs, is a part of divine worship, which we ought to 
perform always in the spirit, and in truth, and with solemnity ; 
to be watchful, that nothing in our singing should detract our 
minds from the serious contemplation of what we sing ; that we 
ought to avoid such light tunes which may make us merry 
rather than serious ; and that our singing should always tend 
more to the glory of God, than to the tickling of the outward 
ear. (I Cor. 14, 15 ; Eph. 5 :15 ; Col. 3 :16.) 

1847 — It was on the 21st day of May, A.D. 1847, that the 
brethren from the east, west, north, and south assembled in 
the A.M. at the house of Brother Isaac Deardorff in Franklin 
County, Pennsylvania, and on the day following entered upon 
the business of the church, which seemed to be somewhat 
involved in clouds, and these appeared to lower themselves 
and become darker. This produced an anxious concern for 
the future peace and welfare of the church. At length the 
Lord in mercy was pleased once more to smile on his troubled 
children, and to grant them a joyful expectation of His help- 
ing His servants in the arduous task before them. Thus, then, 
the points and queries presented were considered and dis- 
cussed, with rather unusual unanimity, in the fear of the Lord, 
as follows : 

ARTICLE I. Whether we could not amend our plan in 
holding our yearly meetings, that the business might be con- 
ducted more quietly and orderly? Concluded, in regard to 
our yearly meetings, that the brethren meet on Saturday, be- 
fore Pentecost, and have public meeting till Sunday evening. 
Love Feast to be held either on Saturday or Sunday evening, at 
the option of the church where the yearly meeting is held. On 
Monday the council meetings begin, and continue until all the 
business is transacted. The council to consist of delegates, not 
more than two, lo be sent from each church with a written 
certificate, containing, also, the queries to be presented (by the 
church whom they represent) to the yearly meeting. The 
delegates to constitute a committee of the whole, to receive 
and examine all matters communicated to the yearly meeting, 
and to arrange all the queries and questions for public dis- 
cussion ; and after they are publicly discussed, and the general 
sentiments heard, then the delegates are to decide ; and if two- 
thirds or more of the delegates agree, let the decision thus 
made be final ; but if the nature of the case be such that two- 
thirds do not give their consent, let it be delayed, until it re- 
ceived the voice of at least two-thirds of the legal 
representatives. The yearly meetings to be attended by as 



Annual Meetings 401 

many teachers and members as may think proper to do so, 
and the privilege in discussion to be free and open to all who 
may desire to participate in the same, as heretofore. 

1866 — The committee appointed at last Annual Meeting 
to devise some plan for holding our Annual Meetings, which 
will be more satisfactory to the brotherhood, was called upon 
for its report and submitted the following : 

THE ANNUAL MEETING 

We recommend that the Annual Council be formed by 
the delegates sent by the District Meetings and by all the 
ordained elders present; that the meeting be held at the 
place designated by the Council the preceding year, to com- 
mence on the first Tuesday after Whitsunday, the previous 
Lord's Day (Whitsunday) to be spent as it has hitherto been 
by the brethren in worship .... the meeting should be 
opened with devotional exercises, and the reading of the 15th 
chapter of Acts . . . .; that the meeting still be held 
alternately in the East and in the West. 

THE DISTRICT MEETING 

We recommend that each State form itself into convenient 
district meetings. That these meetings shall be formed by one 
or two representatives from each organized church and we 
recommend that each church be represented in the district 

meeting, either by representative or by letter All 

questions that cannot be settled at the district meetings should 
be taken to annual meetings, they should be correctly and 
carefully formed ; and all queries from district meeting should 

be accompanied with an answer And it is considered 

very desirable, and indeed necessary, that in all cases m 
answering questions, both in district and annual meetings, that 
some Scripture authority or reason be given for the decision, 
though it should be done as briefly as possible. 

THE ORGANIZATION OF ANNUAL MEETING 

The Bishop and Elders of the church holding the annual 
meeting shall select, from among the Bishops present, the 
standing committee. Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Indiana, and Illinois shall each be entitled to three, if present, 
and two, if present, from each of the remaining states in which 
the churches are established, and whenever said states shall 
contain 10 Bishops each, they also shall be entitled to three. 
The standing committee shall choose its own officers. These 
shall be a moderator, two clerks and a door keeper .... 

As soon as the standing committee has been named they 
shall retire to a private room for organization and the recep- 
tion of queries presented by the delegates from the district 
meetings (or churches), after which all proper queries shall 



402 History — Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

be read to the general council meeting for adoption or 
amendment, and sub-committees be dispensed with .... 

This report was adopted by the following resolution: 

Resolved, that we try the committee's report for at least 
a sufficient length of time to give it a fair trial. 

ARTICLE XXL inasmuch as the freedmen of the South 
are in a starving condition and also destitute of education and 
Christianity, would not this District Council Meeting (southern 
district of Indiana) think it advisable to adopt some plan for 
their relief, and present it to our next Annual Conference for 
their deliberation? Whereupon it was resolved that this 
meeting make arrangements to raise funds, and appoint two 
brethren to go into the southern states as soon as the nature of 
the case will admit of it, and distribute those funds among the 
needy, irrespective of color, and also preach the Gospel when- 
ever opportunity may present itself. (Submitted to Annual 
Meeting.) The following is the action of Annual Meeting 
upon the above : We heartily approve of the above, and bid 
our brethren Godspeed, and recommend to our brotherhood 
to imitate the worthy example of our dear brethren in southern 
Indiana. 

ARTICLE XLVIII. Request for committees. 

In response to a petition from the brethren in Virginia for 
pecuniary help for Brother Peter Crumpacker, an elder in the 
church, who lost $3,000 in getting his brethren out of prison, 
and being robbed by the rebels, this Annual Meeting recom- 
mends to all the churches in the North to assist liberally this 
worthy brother to bear his loss which he, through love to his 
brethren sustained. We appoint Brother Benjamin Moomaw 
the receiver, to receive the funds collected. 

Forty-eight articles were considered at this Annual 
Meeting. 

1885 — ARTICLE III. As there were several papers be- 
fore the meeting relating to the management of the Annual 
Meeting, they were submitted to the committee which made 
the following report, and it was accepted by the meeting: 

First, the meeting shall be held where there are good 
railroad facilities, and where the committee of arrangements 
can procure sufficient and suitable lodging quarters at 
reasonable rates. 

Second, meals to be furnished at the uniform price of 25 
cents each. 

Third, the dining hall or halls to be so arranged and con- 
ducted that the standing committee and delegates may have 
the usual services at the table where they eat. 

Fourth, a lunch stand to be also provided for the sale of 
refreshments. 

We also recommend economy in the management of the 
meeting, and caution our brethren against making the A. M. 
an occasion of money-making. 






Annual Meetings 



403 




Farm of Michael Bashore, Mexico 
Annual Meeting of 1885. 

We further recommend that our members continue to 
perpetuate and maintain their well earned reputation for 
Christian hospitality by opening their houses and barns free 
of charge for sleeping purposes to visiting members at their 
Penecostal meeting. 

All surplus funds shall be turned over to the church 
erection and missionary committee. 

All former decisions of Annual Meeting in any way 
conflicting with the above are hereby repealed. 









CHAPTER XIII 



RELATED ORGANIZATIONS 

GEORGE ADAM MARTIN AND THE SEVENTH DAY 

BAPTIST MOVEMENT 

Among the early leaders of the Church of the Brethren 
in America as well as in the Southern District of Pennsylvania 
was George Adam Martin whose name is listed in the Historv 
of the Church of the Brethren of Eastern Pennsylvania (P. 78) 
as one of the elders who constituted a tower of strength during 
a part or all of the thirty-year pre-revolutionary period (1740- 
1770). He was a man of strong personality, a natural orator 
and readily won friends wherever he went. He united with 
the church at Coventry where Martin Urner, Sr., was pre- 
siding elder. In Chronicon Ephra tense (P. 244) he refers to 
Martin Urner as his superintendent and states that in the year 
1737 while attending a baptism at Greatswamp, with his 
superintendent, he suggested to Elder Urner the reading of 
Matthew 18 before baptism instead of Luke 14 which was cus- 
tomarily read. "This suggestion was accepted and first 
followed in the Greatswamp and has been the rule of the 
Brotherhood ever since." (History of the Eastern District 
P. 282.) It was also at his suggestion that Annual Conferences 
were begun in the Brotherhood. After having attended a 
three-day un/or/interdenominational conference held at Oley 
by Count Zizendorf, to which he was sent by his superinten- 
dent, he reported that he feared these conferences might be- 
come snares to lead the Brethren from the faith and they there 
"agreed to get ahead of the danger .... by holding a Great 
Assembly and fixed at once the time and place." (Chron. Eph. 
P. 245) the time being 1742 and the place presumably 
Coventry. 

Upon the organization of the Big Conewago Congregation 
in York County he was elected to be its presiding elder. He 
probably remained there a greater length of time than 
anywhere. Historians usually infer that he remained there 
until about 1760 when he was excommunicated and that he 
was succeeded in the eldership by Daniel Leatherman who 
served the congregation until he moved to Maryland. The 
date given by Dr. J. M. Henry for Elder Leatherman^ going 
to Maryland (History of Church of Brethren in Maryland) is 
1756. From that date it would seem that Elder Martin might 
have left Conewago in the early 1750's. We believe that he 



Related Organizations 405 

did and that he lived in the Conewago Congregation at two 
different times. 

His restless spirit and missionary zeal led him to Franklin 
(then Cumberland) County. The names of George Martin 
and John Mack are given in the list of prominent early settlers 
in the vicinity of Waynesboro as well as in the list of taxables 
for 1751-1752. (Waynesboro Centennial History [1797-1900] 
by Nead). His name is given as one who assisted Abraham 
Stouffer to organize the Conococheague or Antietam Congrega- 
tion in 1752. It has been said (by D.H.F.) that at one time he 
owned two farms in this vicinity — the one just south of the 
present borough limits of Waynesboro (now owned by D. G. H. 
Lesher) the other about one mile from Mont Alto (owned by 
George McFerren in 1898). In the Chambersburg court house 
there is a draft of a warrant of land in Quincy Township 
(Antietam Congregation) which was granted to George 
Martin on September 6, 1762. On January 14, 1772, "George 
Martin, minister/' sold this land to Geo. Shilley. He was 
married before September 4, 1745 :i: , to Mary, the daughter of 
Wilhelmus and Feronica Knipperf (Knepper) of the 
Conewago Congregation. 

He evidently later returned to the Conewago Congrega- 
tion where a church trial took place because of his teaching, 
after which he united with the German Seventh Day Baptist 
Church at Ephrata. (See Big Conewago Congregation). 
Probably he visited Antietam again between his excommunica- 
tion and his reception into the church at Ephrata. Chronicon 
Ephratense states that when he arrived at Ephrata and was 
asked by Friesdam (C. Beissel) from whence he came, he re- 
plied, "from Canecotschicken" (Conococheague). Conrad 
Beissel made him superintendent of the Bermudian church, but 
his stay there was not long for in 1762 he was in Bruderthal 
(Brother's Valley) in Bedford (now Somerset) County, 
Pennsylvania, where he organized the Stony Creek Church. 
He returned to the Antietam territory where he is said to have 
received a cordial greeting by those who did not know of his 
excommunication. He began preaching the Seventh Day 
Baptist doctrine and "was stoutly resisted by Brethren John 
Mack and Staub." In 1764 he held an evangelistic meeting 
here which caused a great "awakening", glowing reports of 
which reached Conrad Beissel at Ephrata who with a group 
of Cloister members visited the community, organized the 
Antietam Congregation of the German Seventh Day Baptist 
Church, and installed George Adam Martin as teacher and 

* While the Prior (Israel Eckerlin) and another Solitary Brother, G. A. Martin, were on a 
journey the Prior told him : "You will have a wife within three years" ; he was answered, 
"And you will not be in Ephrata after three years." .... and this was exactly ful- 
filled to both of them." (Chron. Eph. P. 175). Israel Eckerlin left Ephrata September 
4, 1745. (Chron. Eph. P. 186). 

fWilhelmus Knipper united with the church in Germany, was persecuted for his faith, im- 
prisoned 3| years and upon his release came to America on the ship Allen, James Craigie, 
Master, landing at Philadelphia September 15, 1729. He wrote a pamphlet in defense of 
his faith which has been cherished by his descendants. 



406 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

leader. Many Church of the Brethren people went with the 
new organization. Cloister life was soon established. (See 
Seventh Day Baptist Church.) 

After actively participating for a few years in the Seventh 
Day Baptist movement at Antietam, Bermudian, Ephrata and 
Philadelphia, he returned to Stony Creek in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, where in 1770 he and his wife were listed by Morgan 
Edwards as constituent members of that congregation and 
where it is generally supposed that "he ended his days."* 
April 29, 1794, is given as the date of his death on page 515 
in the German Sectarians of Pennsylvania (1742-1800) by 
Sachse. 

Concerning the Seventh Day Baptist movement in 
Bermudian and Antietam territory the Chronicon Ephratense 
(compiled by Lamech and Agrippa — 1786) makes the follow- 
ing statements: "This awakening took place during the 
above mentioned war (French and Indian), and may have 
commenced about the year 1757. The members of this 
awakening, as well as their teacher, George Adam Martin, be- 
fore this belonged to the Baptists but left that congregation 
induced by circumstances which had their first start with 
George Adam Martin. ,, (Chron. Eph. P. 242.) 

"You ask how and why I might have joined the Seventh 
Day Baptists? .... On my account nearly 60 souls were 
banished (a likeness to John 9:22) . . . therefore we formed 
a congregation. However I continued to preach as before and 
there was a great commotion throughout almost the whole 
land, so that I was in demand, " wrote George Adam Martin 
(P. 252) (See also Big Conewago Congregation). Following 
this is a record of his visit to Ephrata, of his reception into the 
Seventh Day Baptist Church and of his appointment to the 
superintendent of the Bermudian Congregation. 

"Through this movement a door was opened for a new 
church period, during which much important spiritual work 
was transacted. The superintendent (Conrad Beissel) called 
the awakening at Antitum from this period on, the Eagle 
church, after the fourth beast in the Apocalpyse ; although 
these good people considered themselves too lowly and 
unworthy of such a high title." (Page 259) .... "And now 
the fire of the awakening spread over the whole region of 
Antitum. Many secretly stole away from their houses and 
ran after this wonder, for the former Brethren of Bro. G. A. 
(Martin), in order to put a stop to this awakening, sent two of 
their Brethren, John Mack and Staub, to all their houses to 
warn them against being seduced. " (Page 260.) 

"The spirit of awakening about this same time caused so 
much work between Ephrata, Bermudian and Antitum that 
visitors were continually on the march to and fro, which 
nourished the mutual love .... The superintendent him- 

*History of German Baptist Brethren Church (P. 102) by G. N. Falkenstein. 



Related Organizations 407 



self was in Antitum three times and this in his old age .... 
At that time the fire burnt in the Philadelphia church which 
each and everyone at Antitum tried to keep up, even at the 
risk of his earthly possessions. At this time Brethren G. A. 
(Martin) and H. (Horn) paid a new visit to the Settlement 
(Ephrata), in order to see the superintendent once more . . . 
After this the said Bro. G. A. paid a visit to Philadelphia 
.... after their visit was ended in blessing they gave the last 
kiss of peace to the superintendent, for they did not see him 
again." (P. 261-262.) (Conrad Beissel died July 6, 1768.) 



OLD GERMAN BAPTIST BRETHREN 

The nuclei of the Old German Baptist Church were 
former members of the Church of the Brethren (then called 
German Baptist Brethren) who withdrew from the church be- 
cause their peace was disturbed by innovations which had 
crept into it. They adopted the name of OLD German Baptist 
Brethren to stress the fact that their aim was to "adhere more 
strictly to the ancient order of the church as practiced by the 
ancient fathers" and also "to designate them from those who 
introduced and admitted new measures into their body". 
Some of the innovations which disturbed them were, "high 
schools, revival meetings, Sunday schools and conventions, 
missionary boards, two modes of feet washing". (Vin. 1881.) 

The Vindicator of October, 1881, (P. 300) states that "the 
withdrawal on the part of the old brethren church from the 
fast element had its commencement (1869) in Miami Valley, 
Ohio. All hopes were centered there as there was perhaps no 
part of the brotherhood where the old order members are yet 
as strong .... and where the old order of faith and practice 
is yet as well kept up." This group suffered grievances over 
a period of years during which time it sent several petitions 
to Annual Meeting, (the first in 1869), stating these grievances 
and asking that they be rectified. The petition which was sent 
in 1880 was resent (with variations) in the form of resolu- 
tions in 1881 and became known as the "Miami platform". 
In it they urged that these innovations which were causing 
trouble be removed so that "peace and union might be 
restored". The Annual Meeting made some concessions but 
stated that "while we are conservative we are also 
progressive". 

"This was not satisfactory, for the brethren were praying 
to have the progressive movement put away and not retained/ 
Believing it was useless to send any more requests to Annual 
Meeting, arrangements were made for a meeting to be held in 
the Painter Creek Church, Ohio, on August 24, 1881, the 
object of which as stated was: "to consult with regard to the 



408 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



necessary provisions for the preservation of a unanimity of 
sentiment in faith and practice, the purity of the church, etc/*' 
At that meeting resolutions were drawn up and "signed by 15 
elders, mostly from Ohio, — some from Indiana and Iowa — to 
withdraw fellowship from those who walk disorderly in the 
brotherhood. " (Vindicator, 1881, P. 297.) These resolutions 
were circulated in the various churches, and those who 
accepted them thereby became members of the new 
organization — the Old German Baptist Brethren. 

Previous to this, however, in the fall and winter of 1880 
and 1881 a few hundred members in the east had withdrawn 
fellowship from the Annual Meeting group. This small group 
met in conference in Frederick County, Maryland, at Pentecost 
in 1881. In 1882 the western and eastern groups united in 
their first Annual Meeting at Brookville, Ohio. 

Excerpts from Resolutions Adopted in the Painter Creek 

Church, Ohio, August 24, 1881 

"Resolved, That we will more strictly adhere to the self- 
denying principles of the Gospel as practiced by our ancient 
brethren .... popular Sunday schools and revival meet- 
ings, the way they are generally conducted .... we say, 
that we feel to suffer none in the Brethren's church and then 
we will be sure to have no trouble with them. No Sunday 
schools, no high schools, no revival meetings, no paid ministry, 
no missionary plans or missionary boards now granted by 
Annual Meeting, no money soliciting or begging to carry out 
such plans, no single mode of feet washing, no musical 
instruments . . . ." 

"Resolved, Further, that we fully adhere to primitive 
Christianity as taught by Christ and His apostles in all His 
commandments and precepts as practiced by our forefathers 
and that we strictly adhere to a plain and decent uniformity 
of dress as soldiers of King Immanuel, .... And above all 
that brethren and sisters be more on their guard and more re- 
served in their conversation, as that unruly tongue is doing 
much mischief among us." 

"It was intimated that all those who would vote to stand 
by these resolutions would absent themselves from the then 
acknowledged Annual Meeting." (Gleaned from "Brethren's 
Reasons" in appendix to Minutes of Annual Council — Joseph 
L. Cover and Samuel Murray, Publishing Agents.) 

The congregations in the Southern District of Pennsyl- 
vania which were effected by this secession were those of the 
Antietam and the Falling Spring. The trouble in the Antietam 
Congregation was due in part to the question of leadership 
and in part to the growing sentiment in favor of Sunday schools 
and higher institutions of learning ; the Sunday school in the 
Waynesboro Church which was first organized in 1872 (see 



Related Organizations 409 

Sunday school under Waynesboro Congregation) was grow- 
ing ; tnere were those in the congregation who supported the 
tiunt,ngdon Normal School from its beginning in 1876 (see 
Relation of Waynesboro to Juniata College) ; those who felt 
that Sunday schools and educational institutions were not "in 
harmony with the spirit of the Gospel of Christ" were much 
disturbed. Sympathy with the seceders of the Antietam 
Congregations and with the "Miami platform" led to the 
secession in the Falling Spring Congregation. (See Antietam 
and Falling Spring Congregations.) 



FIRST BRETHREN CHURCH 

A group of German Baptist Brethren members, who were 
desirous of more progressive action along some of the lines in 
which the "Old Order" group considered the church to be 
already far too progressive, withdrew in 1882 under the 
leadership of H. R. Holsinger and organized the Brethren 
(now called First Brethren) church. As none of the congre- 
gations of the Southern District of Pennsylvania were effected 
by this movement we will not further discuss it here. 



DUNKER BRETHREN 

The Dunker Brethren represent a movement affecting a 
number of churches of Southern Pennsylvania. These 
brethren wish to hold more closely to the regulations of the 
fathers in matters of dress and simple life. The organization 
is similar to that of the Church of the Brethren. They do not 
have a separate publishing house. The fundamental beliefs 
are the same as the Church of the Brethren. 



CHAPTER XIV 



SPECIAL BIOGRAPHY 

DIRDORFF - DIERDORFF - DEARDORFF 

The Dierdorffs who were connected with the early history 
of our church in York County were descendants of Antony 
Dirdorff who with Jacob More, Rudolph Harley and John 






LTD M H< i ' ,' ■ ' • - > : x * * ' < K * J~* i,* S * '* ' * • 






^.fritt/vn^ 



<^C ' Cr £*•***■* fl) Sit 'UK-/*' >~"*tlx#\.'b' '«'&'<.- /. *' -Prs^ < x»tJ&(t./i ?< | !' - v • <H - -•• <■' d I^M C ■- ■ ',. -• • ,V'"' '■ • ■ 

. ' ' X, w' •" « ' (^^ * * • ' V / ^ 






fd-f^UiifeHU^tx*/ ts/^J f;e<>»* 'r - ; -' . ' '• ' ' i .. /., (Su^nc ■ -' ■ '9 ' ,, . . ■ ••<*.••».,( .' . ,; -»/'.- f'/j 



,:•: 



i 



(ICt.^i,.,"',^-! 






it. *- &.> I '. vi-uf , > ^J* ' *,*'", ' " ' ' f ■ >- i ""'',, , jf * >'. • *"'&"• t if f if t 






p 
( 




/, . '/ MAhit^^t 



M^nf $**^*$L 



<' til*/ &/&#> 






Facsimile Deed by Jacob Moor to John Naas 



Special Biography 411 

Peter Laushe helped John Nass to found the Brethren Church 
at Amwell, New Jersey, in 1733. Brumbaugh's History of the 
Brethren, page 335 and History of the Brethren of Eastern 
Pennsylvania, page 163, state that these men crossed the Dela- 
ware River to New Jersey with John Naas in 1733. That An- 
tony Dirdorff, Jacob More, and Rudolph Harley were living 
in New Jersey some time previous to the arrival of John Naas - 
is evidenced by the fact that they were naturalized in New 
Jersey during the session of legislature which convened m 

May 1730**. ,. , . ,. , . , 

Antony Dirdorff and John Naas lived and died on neigh- 
boring farms, and are probably buried in the same graveyard 
on a farm near Ringoes (though no stone has been found to 
indicate Antony's burial place). On May 8, 1734 when Jacob 
Moor (Moore) gave a deed of transfer of 25 acres ol land to 
John Naas, Antony Dirdorff signed his name as a witness. 
The land in this transfer joined the land of Antony s son, 

Henry. , ,. . , . 

Family tradition says that because of persecution tor his 
Christian faith Antony Dirdorff emigrated to America from 
the Rhine Valley in Germany (probably from the Duchy ot 
Newit where he lived when his oldest son was born), lradi- 
tion as well as the Christian Family Companion of 18b8"*- 
state that he came in September, 1729, with Alexander Mack, 
which is an error, as neither of the two original lists ot pas- 
sengers who came on that boat contain his name. (These lists 
are preserved in the archives of the Pennsylvania State 
Library. The sea captain's list is very legible, the other list 
which contains the immigrants' own signatures is not so 
legible.) The time of his coming has recently been cleared 
through an excerpt of a letter in the possession of H. Minot 
Pitman, of Stonington, Connecticut. This letter was written 
in German script at Amwell, New Jersey, on October 1, 17d4, 
to Johann Diedrich Fahnestock and contains the following in 
a postscript written by Henrich Dierdorff who was Antony s 
son and Diedrich's brother-in-law. "My father is a devout 
and intelligent man who does many good works and has been 
here fifteen years." This indicates he came in the same year 
(1719) as Peter Becker. May we not assume from this that 
the family tradition of his immigration with a group of early 
Brethren families is correct, but that the group with which he 
came was the one in 1719 under the leadership of Peter 
Becker instead of the one in 1729 with Alexander Mack ! 

From the will**** of Antony Dirdorff and the signatures 
to an article of agreement attached thereto, we find his family 

»Naas arriv ed in Philadelphia 1733 and went almost immediately to New Jersey-History 

**SenL^t™jTl£^?™L n ce Bureau at Trenton, New Jersey , also Germans 

-Paje" 3?9 eW "in ^MSlSSVtS? ISiy History of the Brethren. Church," by Abram 
H. Cassel. This is reiterated in History of the Tunkersby , Hols.nger, p. 134, and in 
5 *,rv nf the Brethren Church of Western Pennsylvania by Blough, p. 35. 
."•Wilf was written "in German or " February 1, 1745, and recorded at Trenton, New Jersey. 



412 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

consisted of his wife, Christena, and the following children : 
Hinnch,. Peter, a daughter married to Bernhardes Achenback 
Johannes, Antony, Christian, a daughter married to William 
Echer and Christina (unmarried at that date). Three of his 
sons, Peter, John and Anthony, Jr., (who with their father and 
two other brothers were naturalized in 1730), became early 
settlers in York County, Pennsylvania, where they helped to 
propagate the faith of their father. Among the family names 
of "constituent members" of the Little Conewago Congrega- 
tion, organized in 1738, is that of Dierdorff (supposed to have 
been John). In the list of communicant members of the 
Conewago congregation in 1770 are the names of these three 
brothers, of their nephew Henry, and of Barnet Achenbach 
and wife (supposed to have been their brother-in-law and 
sister) . 

John was the first to go to York County. Family tradi- 
tion says that "John assisted in building the first house — a lo^ 
one— where Little York* now stands." The Pennsylvania 
Archives show that he obtained a warrant for 150 acres of 
land in Reading Township, York County in 1742. The John 
Gunkle (Kunkle) at whose home Annual Meeting was held 
in 1828 was probably his grandson. 

Family tradition states that "Peter Dierdorff was a 
Tunker preacher who preached in the Big Conewago Church 
for 50 years and with George Brown tended that church until 
his death", (1786). The church records, which are meager, 
do not confirm that. The inscription on his stone in the grave- 
yard on the old Dierdorff farm, in Washington Township, 
York County, is: "Eines alten Pilgrims — und — diener — des 
evangelium". (An old pilgrim and servant of the Gospel.) 
He was a member of the Standing Committee at the A. M. in 
1763 in the Conestoga (now White Oak) Congregation, Lan- 
caster Co. Pa. and 1785 in the Big Conewago Congregation, 
York County, Pennsylvania. 

Anthony, Jr., who "was an officer in the church", whose 
wife was Anna Yager,** moved to York County in 1762. In 
his line of descent there have been many ministers of the 
Church of the Brethren, at least six of whom are listed in the 
1941 year book. The Annual Meeting of 1819 was held at the 
home of his son-in-law, Isaac Latshaw, and the one of 1844 at 
the home of his grandson, Peter Dierdorff, both in York 
County. 

Isaac Deardorf, a deacon of the Antietam Congregation, 
Franklin County, at whose home the Annual Meeting was held 
in 1847 was a descendant of Anthony, Sr's., oldest son, Henry 
(by his first wife, Anna Catrina Fahnestock) who moved from 
near Amwell, New Jersey, to the vicinity of Ephrata, Lan- 
caster County, sometime previous to 1746, and whose grand- 



TT 



*The city of York. 
**Daughter of Hans Peter Yager or Jager of Amwell, New Jersey. 



Special Biography 



4L3 



son, Jacob (Isaac's father) settled in Franklin County, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1802. Jacob was married to Catharine, a daugh- 
ter of Elder John and Anna Heffelfinger Zug, of White Oak 
Congregation, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Many of 
Anthony, Sr's., descendants are today members of the Church 
of the Brethren. 



EMMERT 

Emmert, Jesse Benedict, the son of Joseph E. and Eliza- 
beth Benedict Emmert, was born near Waynesboro, Pennsyl- 
vania, on October 11, 1873. He was reared in a Christian 
home wherein the principles love for Christ were early 
instilled into the hearts of the children. His parents were 
actively interested in the church ; his father being a deacon 
and Sunday school teacher, his mother a worker in the Sisters' 
Aid Society. His mother was a descendant of Alexander 
Mack, Sr. 

His early education was received in the elementary 
grades of the Waynesboro school, after which he entered a 
factory and learned the pattern makers trade. In 1894 he 
entered Huntingdon Normal School (now Juniata College) 
financing his expenses by his trade. 

While at home on his Christmas vacation in 1895 he 
united with the Church of the 
Brethren by baptism when he 
wholeheartedly consecra ted 
his life to his Redeemer. Soon 
thereafter he became deeply 
interested in missions and 
through his devotion and zeal 
changed the trend of the lives 
of many young people. He was 
elected to the ministry on May 
11, 1901. A few months after 
graduating from Juniata Col- 
lege in 1902 he and D. J. 
Lichty sailed to India with Wil- 
bur B. Stover and wife who 
were returning from their first 
furlough. It was a keen dis- 
appointment to leave his fiance, 
Gertrude Elvina Rowland, of 
Hagerstown, Maryland, in the 
homeland. She, however, fol- 
lowed him two years later and 
they were married February 
23, 1905. 

Through his strong per- 
sonality, his loving and sym- J. B. Emmert 




414 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

pathetic nature, his mechanical and educational training there 
was a wide and varied field of service opened for him in India, 
where he spent 16 years. In 1903 he organized the Mission 
Industrial School at Bulsar and continued in that work ten 
years. He was elected to the Eldership at Bulsar in 1909. He 
served as secretary of the India Mission from 1911 to 1918. 
From 1913 to 1919 he did missionary, evangelical, educational 
and editorial work. 

During his second furlough he again entered Juniata Col- 
lege from which he received his B.D. degree in June, 1921. 
Three years later his Alma Mater honored him with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity. 

Being hindered, on account of Sister Emmert's health, 
from returning to India he responded to a call in 1921 to be- 
come instructor of Bible and director of Religious Education 
at La Verne College in California and in this work manifested 
the same zeal and efficiency which marked his service else- 
where. While here he served also as director of Religious 
Education of the Pacific Coast Region of the Church of the 
Brethren and director of the "Forward Movement", District 
of Southern California and Arizona. 

In 1928-29 he with Brother C. D. Bonsack spent six 
months visiting our African Mission field where he endeared 
himself to many of the natives. At the time of his death he 
was serving his ninth year on the General Mission Board. 
While on a trip to one of the Board meetings in Chicago, 
Illinois, he contracted pneumonia and died in the Bethany 
Hospital on April 8, 1933. His wife having preceded him in 
death eight and one-half years, he was survived by his three 
children, Lloyd, Anna (Mrs. Marvin Bollinger) and Mary, 
all of California. His body was taken to La Verne, California, 
for burial. The attendance at his funeral of more than 1,500 
people was a manifested tribute to this prince and beloved 
man of God. 



GARNER 

Garner, Holly Pearl, the son of Jasper C. and Hannah 
Salome Yon Garner, was born on a farm in Carroll County, 
Maryland, on September 17, 1884. He received his early 
training in the Christian home of his parents, on the farm and 
in the little country school house. 

In 1903 he entered Blue Ridge College, which was then 
located at Union Bridge, Maryland, where he took both a 
commercial and stenographic course, after which he secured 
a position as stenographer at the Landis Machine Company in 
Waynesobro, Pennsylvania, and later became its bookkeeper 
and shipping clerk. 



Special Biography 



415 



:s 




H. P. Garner 



While attending evangelistic meeting; 
in 1903 at the Pipe Creek Church in Mary- 
land, he made his decision for Christ and 
united with the Church of the Brethren. 
After going to Waynesboro (Antietam 
Congregation) in 1905 he became active in 
the Sunday school and the Missionary As- 
sociation. During two summers he served 
as Superintendent of the rural Union Sun- 
day School at Mount Vernon school house. 
At the spring love feast at the Price 
Church (Antietam Congregation) in 1909 
he was elected to the ministry. In the fail 
of that year he entered Bethany Bible 
School at Chicago, Illinois, from which he graduated in 1913. 
He spent his summer vacation of 1910 working in Waynes- 
boro, when he was advanced to the second degree of minis-try, 
and that of 1912 as pastor of the Lewistown, Minnesota, 
church. 

After graduating from Bethany he spent two years as an 
academic student at Blue Ridge College in New Windsor, 
Maryland, during which time he had charge of the Bible De- 
partment of that institution. 

On May 27, 1913, he was married to Kathryn Barkdoll, 
of Batavia, Illinois. Previous to this time both he and his wife 
had wholly dedicated their lives to the Lord to be used by 
Him in whatever way He chose. In 1914 they presented them- 
selves to the General Mission Board as candidates for the 
China Mission field. As there was a greater need at that time 
for workers in India they were asked to go there and in the 
fall of 1916 sailed for that field, where they did evangelistic 
and educational work among the Marathi speaking people at 
Palghar and Ahwa. Brother Garner was supported by the 
Sunday schools of Middle Maryland and Sister Garner by the 
Sunday schools of Northern Illinois. 

After two terms of service they retired from Foreign 
Mission work (1932) in order to care for Mrs. Garner's aged 
parents. Since 1936 they have been living at Pioneer, Ohio, 
where Brother Garner is serving as pastor of the Silver Creek 
Church. Their children were born in India, Jasper in 1921 
and Warren in 1926. 



MACK 



John Mack, the son of Alexander Mack, Sr., came to 
America with his father in 1729, resided in Germantown 
awhile, then sold his property and moved to "the Antitum 
region in the Cumberland Valley where he stoutly resisted the 



416 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

introduction of the Seventh Day influence, and where he died, 
loyal to his religion". (History of the Brethren, by Brum- 
baugh, page 97.) His name is given in the list of prominent 
early settlers in the vicinity of Waynesboro, Franklin County, 
as well as in the list of taxables for 1751-52. (Waynesboro 
Centennial History 1797-1900 by Nead.) The date of his 
death is unknown. He is said to have been buried in the 
vicinity of his home in the Royer graveyard on the Hess farm 
a few miles east of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 

His wife was Margrett Sneider. They had sons, Jacob, 
Alexander and Christian (?). Jacob lived and died near 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania ; Alexander moved to Western 
Pennsylvania; the name of Christian Mack is given in the 
early marriage records of the Salem Reformed Church near 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. Jacob was married to Anna 
Engelhart. The birth record of Jacob and Anna's family gives 
the names of nine daughters among whom are Maria 
(1765- ) who married David Stoner, the ancestor of Elder 

Jacob F. Oiler; Nancy (1774-1874) who married John Bene- 
dict, the ancestor of Elder Jesse B. Emmert, missionary to 
India of the Church of the Brethren; Susanna (1777-1862) 
who married Samuel Royer, one of whose descendants has in 
her possession the John Mack family Bible — a Christopher 
Saur edition of 1743. (It has no family record.) 

William Mack (1749-1813) the son of Alexander, Jr., 
and Elizabeth Nice, moved to the vicinity of Waynesboro in 
early life. He was a blacksmith by trade and was married 
to Agnes Gantz (1754-1808). They were the parents of two 
sons and seven daughters. Three of their daughters married 
Holsingers: Elizabeth married John, Lydia married David, 
both sons of Jacob Holsinger, Sr., while Polly married Jacob, 
grandson of Jacob Holsinger, Sr. Agnes Mack died in this 
locality after which William went to live with his daughter, 
Elizabeth, in Bedford County where he died and is buried at 
Baker's Summit. 

There were 37 Mack descendants among the charter 
members of the Waynesboro congregation. 



MOSES MILLER 

Moses Miller, born March 27, 1820, near Hanoverdale, 
Dauphin County, Pennsylvania; died June 26, 1885, in 
Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

He was the son of Henry and Elizabeth Kline Miller and 
the grandson of George Miller, the first Church of the Breth- 
ren minister of Big Swatara Church, Eastern Pennsylvania. 
On May 23, 1843, he was united in marriage to Hannah 
Mohler, daughter of Daniel, the Rev. Daniel Bollinger the first 



Special Biography 417 

elder of the Cumberland County church performing the cere- 
mony. To this union were born Solomon, Henry J., Sarah 
(who married George Attick), Mary (who married Addison 
Horner). He had a common school education and was a 
farmer by occupation. He united with the Church of the 
Brethren in early life, was elected to the ministry in 1849 in 
Lower Cumberland Congregation, was ordained to the elder- 
ship in 1865. He represented his district at Annual Meeting 
seven times (while it was a part of the Middle District). 
He never had his photograph taken. 



MOHLER FAMILY 

Among the early settlers in Cumberland County were 
Christian Mohler and his nephew, Daniel, who purchased land 
there in 1800. There is no about about the large part in the 
work of this congregation, (Cumberland County Church of 
the Brethren) taken by the descendants of the Mohler family. 
Though not many ministers they were faithful and active as 
Brethren. Annual Meeting was held on the farm of Daniel 
in 1824. The ground for the Mohler church was donated by 
Daniel's son, Solomon. Rudolp Mohler, elected to the minis- 
try in the Cumberland County church in 1832, and Allen 
Mohler, elected in the Upper Cumberland congregation in 
1846, were members o f this large family. t 

Other ministers of the Mohler family who served in 
Lower Cumberland congregation were John M. Mohler, Levi 
S. Mohler and his son, Harry B. Mohler. 



WILLIAM STOVER 

William Stover (1715 or 25 - 1800) was a native of 
Switzerland. (In early records we find his family name spell- 
ed Stober* and Staber**. The signature to his will written m 
German is Wilhelm Stober.) In the early seventeen fifties 
(probably 1752) he immigrated to America with his wife, 
Judith Schafer (or Schaeffer), and children. After a sojourn 
in Eastern Pennsylvania he moved to Franklin County, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1754. Tradition says that his parents were 
members of the Reformed Church; that he united with the 
German Baptist Brethren (now Church of the Brethren) after 
coming to America ; that he was soon elected to the ministry 
and thence advanced to the eldership of the Antietam congre- 
gation wherein he served with ability. He thus became the 
leader of the earliest church organization for German speak- 
ing people in this vicinity. It was in his congregation, while 

— "History of Church of the Brethren of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Pp. 547-548. 
**History of the Brethren by Brumbaugh, Page 502. 



418 History— Church of the Brethren— Southern Pennsylvania 

he was serving as presiding elder, that the first house of wor- 
ship*** of the Church of the Brethren was erected west of the 
Susquehanna River. He preached the sermon when his church 
was dedicated at which time one of the hymns attributed to 
Peter Becker was sung: — Gross ist unsers Gottes Gute, (Great 
is the goodness of our God). 

His home was about four miles from the church. Family 
tradition says and the nature of the construction of the upper 
rooms in the large stone addition to the original part of his 
dwelling place indicates that preaching services were held 
there. His homestead has been an attraction to many people 
because of the high stone wall 22 inches thick which enclosed 
the garden (110 feet long, 96 feet wide) extending from 
house to barn, the eastern wall of the house and western wall 
of the barn forming part of the enclosure. It is said that there 
is evidence that the wall extended farther west at one time, 
enclosing the house and thus affording a great protection in 
going from house to barn during those times when many In- 
dians were roving around. It is believed that he erected this 
wall as a defense for himself and neighbors in times of Indian 
raids. About 1900 mention was made of there having been 
a fort at this place since when it is frequently spoken of as 
Fort Stouffer (more properly Fort Stover) and an effort has 
been made to place a marker there to memorialize it as such. 
(See page 8.) 

The names of his children as mentioned in his will dated 
April 28, 1797, were: George, William, Margaret Pritz 
(Britz), Michael, Jacob, Daniel, Elizabeth Stoner, Susanna 
Kish (Gish), Emanuel, Catherine Kish (Gish) deceased, 
Hannah Landeis, Ester Feester. 

Two of his sons, George (1748-1826) and Emanuel 
(1761-1833), married Catherine and Susanna, daughters of 
John Price. George migrated to Virginia, along with other 
Brethren families about 1792 and settled at Amsterdam in 
Botetort County. He was a well known physician who travel- 
led over a large territory in Southern Virginia and North Caro- 
lina. He was twice married and the father of 21 children. 
His second wife was Margaret Beaver. 

Michael (1755-1834) who married Christena Hess was 
the ancestor of Daniel F. Good, one of the leaders of the Old 
Order group which withdrew from the Antietam congrega- 
tion in 1881 and who was for many years a prominent elder 
in that denomination. 

Daniel (1757-1822) who married Barbara Benedict suc- 
ceeded his father in the eldership of the Antietam congrega- 
tion. "He was well known throughout the Brotherhood/' 
(Gospel Visitor March 1859.) 

Elizabeth Stover, who was married to David Stoner, the 
son of Ja cob and Antrin Ferguson Stoner, of Ann Arundel 

***The Price Church built in 1795. 



Special Biography 419 

County, Maryland, was the grandmother of Solomon Stoner, 
a prominent elder of the Pipe Creek congregation in Mary- 
land. She was the great-great-grandmother of Mary Alice 
Engel, R.N., missionary of the Church of the Brethren to 

Nigeria, Africa. 

Susanna Stover, who married George Gish, lived m Vir- 
ginia and was the mother of William Gish (1810-1888), one 
of the pioneer missionaries (preachers) to the West. (See 
Brethren Pathfinders, by Moore, page 153). She was the 
grandmother of James Rufus Gish, (1826-1896) in whose 
memory the Gish Book Fund for ministers of the Church of the 
Brethren was established by his wife Barbara Kindig Gish. 

Emanuel (1761-1833) who married Susanna Price was 
the great-grandfather of Wilbur B. Stover, our pioneer mis- 
sionary to India, and also of H. M. Stover, a present elder of 
the Antietam congregation. 

There are many living descendants of Bishop William 
Stover in the Church of the Brethren through the United 
States. The following were charter members of the Waynes- 
boro Congregation (1922) : 

Charles Bock, Mrs. Anna Kauffman Dick, A. R. Dear- 
dorff, Mrs. Jennie Deardorff Flory, Daniel F. Good, H. A. 
Good, Anson Good, Stoler B. Good, Miss Florence M. Hess, 
Mrs. Anna Kauffman, Miss Lillie Kauffman, John Kauffman, 
William Kauffman, Ralph Leiter, Mrs. Ida Price Roop, Mrs. 
Ruth Stover Snider, H. M. Stover, Ira L. Wingert, Laban R. 
Wingert, J. Stover Wingert, Miss Sudie M. Wingert. 









CHAPTER XV 



BIOGRAPHICAL LIST 



PARTIAL LIST OF MINISTERS AND MISSIONARIES 

It is regretted that this is not a complete list of all minis- 
ters who served Southern Pennsylvania. 

* * # * 

ALTLAND, C. H., born 1869; elected to ministry 1900; or- 
dained 1918 ; East Berlin. 

ANDERSON, BRUCE, born January 14, 1903, Wellsville, 
York County. Elected to ministry August 31, 1935, Up- 
per Conewago; ordained August 29, 1936; East Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. 

ANTHONY, WM. ALBERT, born February 10, 1857, Hagers- 
town, Maryland; elected to ministry May 19, 1883 
Beaver Creek, Maryland; ordained May 10, 1902; de- 
ceased July 23, 1911. 

ALDINGER, JACOB, born February 22, 1833, Hanover, 
Pennsylvania; elected to ministry June 6, 1878, Codorus; 
advanced June 3, 1881; deceased October 20, 1906. 

BAKER, CHAS. L., born October 27, 1872, East Berlin, Penn- 
sylvania; elected to ministry 1896; ordained 1905; de- 
ceased January 22, 1935. 

BAKER, DANIEL M., born August 30, 1830, Waynesboro, 
Pennsylvania ; elected to ministry May 2, 1875, Antietam ; 
ordained October 9, 1897; deceased March 4, 1910. 

BARWICK, JOHN W., born November 15, 1898, West Alex- 
andria, Ohio; elected to ministry November 20, 1917, Mt 
Morris, Illinois; installed at York, Pennsylvania. En- 
gaged in relief work in England. 

BAUGHER, AARON, born February 7, 1867, Aadms County, 
Pennsylvania ; elected to ministry 1903, Upper Codorus ; 
ordained in 1912; Lineboro, Maryland, R, D. 2. 

BAUGHER, E. E,, born February 17, 1890, York County. 
Pennsylvania; elected to ministry December 1932; in- 
stalled at Hanover; ordained October 1942, Hanover 

BAUGHER, JOSEPH M., born November 2, 1889, Codorus 
Township, York County; elected to ministry October 8, 
1921, Upper Codorus; ordained York; York, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

BEAHM, WILBUR I., born October 6, 1903, Brentsville, Vir- 
ginia; elected to ministry October 1924, County Line, 



Biographical List 421 

Fayette County; ordained October 30, 1925; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. Church letter was in Greencastle, 
but never lived in the Southern District. 
BEAVER, ADAM, born June 10, 1816, Buffalo Valley, Penn- 
sylvania; elected to the ministry May 30, 1862, Buffalo 
Congregation; advanced 1863; deceased January 7, 

1898. 

BEAVER, JOHN LAWSHE, born April 7, 1823, Union County, 
Pennsylvania; elected to ministry June 3, 1859, Buffalo; 
ordained October 9, 1891; deceasd January 20, 1901. 

BLOUGH, S. S., born April 27, 1868, Hooversville, Pennsyl- 
vania; elected to ministry June 17, 1894, Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania; ordained July 6, 1902, Sidney, Ohio. 
Served as pastor at Greencastle and York. 

BOCK, DAVID, born 1799; elected to ministry April 15, 1846, 
Antietam ; ordained in Falling Springs Congregation ; 
went with Old Order Brethren 1881; deceased 1883. 

BOOK, EDMUND D., born November 13, 1831, Logan, Penn- 
sylvania; elected to ministry 1870, Three Springs; or- 
dained 1893; deceased January 14, 1914. 

BOOK, WM. I., born June 9, 1875, Blain, Pennsylvania; elect- 
ed to ministry 1897, Three Springs, Pennsylvania; install- 
ed 1898, Narberth, Pennsylvania. 

BOONE. JOHN C, born May 26, 1895, Loganton, Pennsyl- 
vania ; elected to ministry August 19, 1922, Sugar Valley ; 
installed. Sufrar Valley; Loganton, Pennsylvania, R. D. 

BOWSER, ISRAEL M., born 1855, York, Pennsylvania 
elected to ministry May 15, 1902, Codorus; ordained 
January 1 1920. 

BOWSER, JOSEPH J., born September 29, 1878, East Berlin, 
Pennsylvania; elected to ministry April 6, 1916, York; 
ordained December 15, 1930 ; York, Pennsylvania. 

BRANDT, DAVID, born April 29, 1799; deceased May 13, 
1870. Preaching services were held at his home until 
building of Brandts Church. 

BRANDT, IRA, ordained, Lost Creek; McAlisterville. 

BRILLHART, DAVID Y., born March 3, 1855, Springfield 
Township, York County; elected to ministry 1866, 
Codorus; ordained September 20, 1900; deceased Sep- 
tember 8, 1929. 

BRINDLE, J. HARRY, born 2, 26, 1873, Cumberland County; 
elected to ministry May 10, 1902, Falling Springs; or- 
dained, Falling Springs ; Polo, Illinois. 

BROWN, ADAM, born October 30, 1830; elected to ministry 
May 26, 1847, Big Conewago; ordained about 1856; de- 
ceased March 17 1896. 

BROWN, CHAS, C, born August 3, 1865, East Berlin; elected 
to ministry about 1895, Chapman Creek, Kansas; served 
Upper Conewago and Hanover, Pennsylvania ; deceased 
1936, York County. 



422 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

BUCHER, RAYMOND B., born January 3, 1905, Brodbecks; 
elected to ministry August 16, 1937; installed August 
29, 1938, Upper Codorus; Brodbecks. 

BURKHART, JOSEPH, born September 14, 1868; elected to 
ministry October 21, 1911, Ridge; installed, Ridge; 
Shippensburg. 

BURKHOLDER, W. H., born February 9, 1882, Cumberland 
County; elected to ministry 1908, Green Spring; installed 
1910, Huntsdale; Carlisle. 

BUFFENMYER, J. A., born March 27, 1887, Lancaster 
County; elected to ministry May 8, 1919, Elizabethtown; 
ordained May 23, 1923; Newville. 

BUFFENMYER, MRS. J. A., born October 28, 1888, Dauphin 
County, Pennsylvania ; elected to ministry December 30, 
1939, Lost Creek; installed January 1, 1941; Newville. 

COCKLIN, ROBERT L., born February 22, 1900, Dillsburg; 
elected to ministry September 25, 1925, Lower Cumber- 
land ; ordained 1942, Ridge; Mechanicsburg R. R. 1. 

COCKLIN, WALTER E„ born December 11, 1876, Dillsburg; 
elected to ministry May 1914, Lower Cumberland; or- 
dained 1936; Mechanicsburg. 

COOK, J. ALBERT, born May 17, 1898, York County; elected 
to ministry May 1, 1936, Lower Conewago; ordained 
1942 ; Dillsburg. 

COOK, O. W., born York County; elected to ministry 1900, 
Lower Conewago ; ordained Lower Conewago ; Decased 
November 1, 1936. 

COOK, ROY D., born August 7, 1886, York County; elected to 
ministry 1921, Lower Conewago; installed 1921; de- 
ceased May 31 1934. 

DANNER, G. HOWARD, born March 5, 1888, Abbottstown; 
elected to ministry October 19, 1912, Pleasant Hill; or- 
dained 1927; Abbottstown. 

DANNER, J. MONROE, born March 12, 1894, Heidelberg 
Township; elected to the ministry August 1918, Upper 
Conewago; ordained November 1935; East Berlin. 

DENTLER, W. NORMAN, born November 14, 1884, Green- 
castle ; elected to ministry March 17, 1928, Back Creek ; 
ordained May 4, 1940 ; Lemaster. 

DETWEILER, GEO. L., born August 21, 1903, Johnstown; 
elected to ministry 1922 ; ordained 1929 ; Waynesboro. 

DETWEILER, MRS. ZOLA MEYERS, born 1903, Rockwood ; 
installed 1924; married George L. Detweiler 1930; 
Waynesboro. 

DICK, TROSTLE P., born January 27, 1888, Maryland; 
elected to ministry November 25, 1915, Antietam; or- 
dained September 11, 1926, Perry; Pottstown, R. 1. 

DITMER. ROBERT L., born July 10, 1900, Dillsburg; elected 
to ministry October 6, 1929, Lower Cumberland ; installed 
September 11, 1930; Port Royal. 



Biographical List 423 

DOTTERER, STANLEY S., elected to ministry 1941, York; 
737 West Princess Street, York. 

EGAN, ELIAS J., born February 12, 1874, Somerset County; 
elected to ministry 1909, Elk Lick ; ordained about 1920, 
Back Creek; deceased February 26, 1939. 

EICHELBERGER, CHAS., born 1893; elected to ministry 
1940 ; Lower Conewago. 

EISENBERG, J. LINWOOD, born April 7, 1877, East Coven- 
try; elected to ministry 1902, Royersf ord ; ordained 1903; 
Shippensburg. 

EMMERT, HARVEY D., born September 21, 1877, Altoona ; 
elected to ministry, October 29, 1905, Huntingdon; or- 
dained January 10, 1928 ; Bunkertown. 

EVANS, ALBERT A., born Dickinson Township ; elected to 
ministry Huntsdale ; ordained January 5, 1918; deceased 
September 26, 1936. 

FAHRNEY, DANIEL H., born March 20, 1836, Quincy; 
church clerk of Antietam; he kept early records of An- 
tietam; deceased December 22, 1924. 

FAHRNEY, JACOB, born May 7, 1798, Chambersburg ; 
elected to ministry November 23, 1825, Antietam; or- 
dained October 23, 1841 ; deceased April 12, 1848. 

FALKENSTEIN, JACOB, born 1775, Philadelphia; elected 
to ministry August 1822, Codorus; ordained 1833; de- 
ceased May 21, 1859. 

FAUST, DAVID A., born February 23, 1867, St. Thomas; 
elected to ministry April 10, 1898, Back Creek; ordained 
October 22, 1904 ; deceased March 27, 1927. 

FLOHR, CHAS. G., born September 22, 1863, Adams County; 
elected to ministry November 27, 1907, Rocky Ridge ; or- 
dained October 30, 1924; Fairfield, R. 1. 

FLOHR, DANIEL 3., elected to ministry June 3, 1917, Falling 
Springs; withdrew with Dunkard Brethren 1928; re- 
turned to Falling Springs March 11, 1939. 

FLOHR, M. R., born November 11, 1866, Indiana; elected to 
ministry September 1907, Back Creek ; deceased March 
9 1938. 

FORNEY, A. E., born August 25, 1874, Franklin County; 
elected to ministry November 20, 1911, Chambersburg; 
installed August 16, 1913; Chambersburg. 

FRY, OBED F., born July 8, 1898, Woodstock, Virginia; 
elected to ministry July 14, 1930, Codorus; ordained 
1942 ; New Freedom. 

FUHRMAN, GEO. B., born October 8. 1899. York County; 
elected to ministry January 1, 1940, Codorus; installed 
January 1, 1941 ; Glen Rock, R. 1. 

GEARHART, LOWELL, born December 4, 1910, Middleburg; 
elected to ministry May 1937, Falling Springs; ordained 
1941 ; Greencastle R. 3. 



424 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

GEARHART, SAMUEL, born August 11, 1883, Zullinger; 
elected to ministry November 1915, Falling Springs; or- 
dained about 1916; deceased January 6, 1936. 

GERMAN, CHRISTIAN, born York County; elected to minis- 
try May 12, 1906, Upper Codorus; ordained December 
31, 1921; deceased May 1939. 

GODFREY, S. C, born December 14, 1889, Carroll County, 
Maryland; elected to ministry January 1, 1920, Codorus; 
ordained January 1, 1930 ; Red Lion R. 2. 

GRAPES, CHARLES E., born September 22, 1891, Hampshire 
County, West Virginia; elected to ministry April 8, 1910, 
Tear Coat, West Virginia ; ordained 1919; Greencastle. 

GROGAN, TRUMAN, installed Upper Conewago; Gardners. 

GROUP, W. G., born April 2, 1872, Adams County; elected to 
ministry 1906, Upper Conewago; ordained 1922; East 
Berlin. 

HANAWALT, WILLIAM CYRUS, born June 24, 1869, Mc- 
Veytown; elected to ministry February 1897, Hunting- 
don; ordained 1942; Gettysburg. 

HARLACHER, D. BUCHER, born March 29, 1880, East Ber- 
lin; elected to ministry April 30, 1910; Upper Conewago; 
ordained May 5, 1928; York Springs. 

HARLACHER, G. W., born October 21, 1875, Adams County; 
elected to ministry September 13, 1913, Lower Cone- 
wago; ordained 1927; Dover. 

HART, IRA M., born December 6, 1876; elected to ministry 
May 10, 1910, Lower Cumberland; installed 1912; 
Mechanicsburg. 

HARTMAN, MARTIN M., born August 1, 1892, Loganville; 
elected to ministry January 1, 1929, Codorus; ordained 
January 3, 1938; York R. 6. 

HASSINGER, OTHO J., born June 8, 1892, Honey Grove; 
elected to ministry November 26, 1926, Lower Cumber- 
land ; ordained April 30, 1933; Huntsdale. 

HEGE, GEORGE, born 1850, Franklin County; elected to 
ministry May 22, 1882, Back Creek; ordained November 
12; 1903 ; deceased July 29, 1904. 

HESS, ARTHUR R., born May 1, 1894, Seven Valleys; elected 
to ministry August 7, 1930, Pleasant Hill ; installed 
December 15 1930 * York 

HOLLINGER, JACOB, born August 22, 1827, Cumberland 
County; elected to ministry Upper Cumberland; pre- 
siding elder, Upper Cumberland ; deceased November 7, 
1908. 

HULL, GEO. W., born March 12, 1884, Washington Town- 
ship; elected to ministry 1918, Upper Conewago; or- 
dained 1937; Bermudian. 

JACOBS, MELVIN, born 1908; elected to ministry 1940; 
Lower Conewago. 



Biographical List 425 

JACOBS, MELV1N A., born February 28, 1882, York County; 
elected to ministry October 6, 1906, First Church, York ; 
ordained 1913; York. 

JENKINS, JESSE O., elected to ministry 1941, York; 625 Col- 
lege Avenue, York. 

JOHNS, B. FRANK, elected to ministry 1907, Ridge; in- 
stalled ; Shippensburg R. 1. 

KEENEY, D. EDWARD, born October 25, 1887, Tolna; 
elected to ministry January 2, 1922, Codorus; ordained 
January 2, 1933 ; York R. 6. 

KEENEY, GEO. H., born March 5, 1874, Loganville ; elected 
to ministry January 1, 1929, Codorus ; ordained January 
3, 1938; York, R. 6. 

KEENEY, JACOB H., born April 19, 1875, Loganville; elected 
to ministry May 25, 1918, Pleasant Hill; ordained June 
9, 1934; Spring Grove. 

KEENEY, JOHN, born April 23, 1796, Jefferson; elected to 
ministry March 28, 1840, Codorus; ordained June 5, 
1857; deceased July 24, 1867. 

KEENEY, WALTER A., born July 16, 1901, East Berlin; 
elected to ministry February 7, 1937, Marsh Creek; or- 
dained 1942 ; Gettysburg. 

KELLER, JOHN H., born July 14, 1861, Seitzland ; elected to 
ministry May 22, 1901, Codorus; ordained January 1, 
1920 ; deceased March 26, 1928. 

KETTERING, HAROLD E., born September 18, 1914, Hum- 
melstown; elected to ministry September 30, 1936, Lower 
Cumberland; installed September 1937; Chicago, Illinois. 

KIPP, EARL S., born September 4, 1904, Newport; elected to 
ministry 1922, Mt. Olivet; ordained 1938; Newport. 

KLINE, B. F., born August 3, 1869, Frederick County, Mary- 
land ; elected to ministry 1925, Marsh Creek ; ordained 
1928 ; Hanover. 

KROUT, ROBERT S., bom March 6, 1888, Springfield Town- 
ship ; elected to ministry, 1930, New Fairview; installed 
1930; Dallastown. 

KURTZ, J. EBERLY, born 1802, Lancaster County; elected to 
ministry 1845, Lancaster County; ordained 1860, Back 
Creek; deceased September 26, 1865. 

LANDIS, EDGAR, born December 24, 1889, Zearfoss, Mary- 
land ; elected to ministry March 17, 1923, Back Creek; 
ordained April 1, 1933 ; Mercersburg. 

LEAS, L. ELMER, born June 12, 1873, E. Berlin; elected to 
ministry July 7, 1910, York; ordained November 4, 1921 ; 
York. 

LEFEVER, ERNEST W., elected to ministry 1941, York; 
graduated Elizabethtown College 1942 ; entered Bethany 
Biblical Seminary September 1942. 

LEHIGH, DAVID M., licensed, Pleasant Hill ; Hanover, R. 2. 



426 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

LEHIGH, S. M., born December 28, 1876; elected to ministry 
October 1908, Black Rock; ordained 1922; Hanover. 

LEHMAN, Peter, born November 23, 1856; installed in min- 
istry April 29, 1902, Falling Springs; ordained about 
1911; deceased August 27, 1925. 

LEHMAN, RALPH B., born August 17, 1891, York; elected 
to ministry August 7, 1830; installed December 15, 1930; 
ordained ; York. 

LEHNER, JOHN, born December 16, 1839, Cumberland 
County; elected to ministry 1874, Back Creek; ordained 
August 29, 1891; deceased November 29, 1922. 

LEITER, LABAN WINGERT, born September 10, 1891, 
Waynesboro; elected to ministry May 24, 1919, Antie- 
tam; installed about 1920; deceased March 12, 1928. 

LIGHTNER, B. F., born June 21, 1859, Gettysburg; elected to 
ministry April 7, 1900, Marsh Creek; ordained 1918; 
Gettysburg. 

LEREW, S. A., born September 26, 1895, New Freedom; 
elected to the ministry January 1, 1940, Codorus; in- 
stalled January 1, 1941; New Freedom. 

LONG, B. F., born March 5, 1874, Centre County; elected to 
ministry September 25, 1927, Sugar Valley; installed; 
served as a minister of Brethren in Christ for 29 years; 
Mill Hall. 

LONG, JOSEPH A., born May 8, 1853, Washington County, 
Maryland; elected to ministry June 19, 1888, E. Berlin; 
ordained April 29, 1899; deceased November 18, 1927. 

MARKEY, MICHAEL, born October 23, 1876, York Town- 
ship; elected to ministry April 24, 1916, Codorus; or- 
dained June 1, 1922; York, R. 2. 

MARTIN, A. B. L., born March 8, 1866, Dauphin County; 
elected to ministry January 7, 1901, Harrisburg; or- 
dained 1915; deceased October 30, 1935. 

MAUSS, FRANK R., born November 23, 1893, Biglerville; 
elected to ministry 1928, Marsh Creek; ordained August 
1928; deceased September 18, 1934. 

McCOY, FRANK, installed, Back Creek ; Lemaster. 

MENSCH, MERVYN W., born August 21, 1896, Millheim; 
elected to ministry May 1918, Buffalo; ordained October 
1935 ; Mifflinburg. 

MENTZER, DANIEL B., born June 9, 1846, Waynesboro; 
elected to ministry May 1, 1909, Antietam; installed 
August 22, 1911; deceased March 7, 1928. 

MENTZER, M. B., born August 18, 1896, Waynesboro; elected 
to ministry April 4, 1923, Back Creek; ordained June 5, 
1925; Chambersburg, R. 3. 

MEYERS, SAMUEL A., born June 9, 1887, Somerset; elected 
to ministry May 20, 1911, Middle Creek; ordained 1918; 
Shippensburg, R. 3. 



Biographical List 427 

M1LHORN, J. JACK, elected to ministry 1941, York; 501 
Carlisle Avenue, York. 

MILLER, ALFRED, born January 17, 1847, Loganton; elected 
to ministry June 4, 1883, Sugar Valley; installed Novem- 
ber 6, 1889; deceased June 25, 1922. 

MILLER, DANIEL, born April 14, 1836, near Welsh Run; 
elected to ministry 1868, Back Creek; ordained June 16, 
about 1890; deceased December 2, 1903. 

MILLER, EDWARD S., born September 1, 1858, Carroll 
County, Maryland; elected to ministry 1885, Upper 
Codorus; ordained May 1900: deceased November 1, 
1936. 

MILLER, HENRY E„ born April 11, 1907, York County; 
elected to ministry August 1937, Upper Codorus; in- 
stalled September 1938 ; Brodbecks. 

MILLER, HENRY L., born January 21, 1895, Latimore ; 
elected to ministry September 26, 1926, Lower Cumber- 
land ; ordianed May 1931; Mechanicsburg. 

MILLER, HENRY R., born January 2, 1868, York County; 
elected to ministry March 8, 1908, Pleasant Hill; or- 
dained June 5, 1920 ; Spring Grove. 

MILLER, J. KURTZ, born September 26, 1865, Greencastle; 
elected to ministry 1890, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; ordained 
1903, Brooklyn, New York; deceased September 20, 1935. 

MILLER, JACOB L., born September 10, 1901, York County; 
elected to ministry July 13, 1936, New Fairview; installed 
April 5, 1937; York, R. 6. 

MILLER, JOHN G., born February 19, 1885, York County; 
elected to ministry April 6, 1918, Upper Codorus; in- 
stalled ; Gettysburg. 

MILLER, PAUL, installed Upper Conewago ; New Oxford. 

MILLER, SAMUEL S., born October 29, 1862, Black Rock; 
elected to ministry 1906, Upper Conewago; ordained 
1912; East Berlin. 

MILLER, WILLIAM H., born March 25, 1869, Cumberland 
County; elected to ministry 1897, Lower Cumberland ; or- 
dained 1912; Millerstown. 

MOORE, JAMES M., born Febraury 10, 1876, Urbana, Illi- 
nois; elected to ministry October 1, 1899, Elgin, Illinois; 
ordained January 13, 1907; served as pastor, Waynes- 
boro 1922-1930 * Lititz 

MUCK, HARRY C, born May 17, 1890, Myersville, Maryland ; 
elected to ministry November 14, 1915, Antietam; or- 
dained May 29, 1926; Waynesboro. 

MUMMERT, DANIEL W., born June 24, 1896, York County; 
elected to ministry September 1937, Upper Codorus; in- 
stalled September 1938; Brodbecks. 



428 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

MURPHY, WILLIAM, born April 9, 1855, Carlisle; elected to 
ministry October 15, 1903, Lower Cumberland ; ordained 
Lower Cumberland ; deceased January 6, 1936. 

MYERS, CLETUS S., born March 1, 1911, Centerville; elected 
to ministry December 17, 1936, Huntsdale; installed 
May 17, 1937; Blaine. 

MYERS, ISAAC, born 1809, Springfield Township; elected to 
ministry May 19, 1850, Codorus; ordained June 8, 1862; 
deceased September 14, 1868. 

MYERS, JACOB, born 1782, Springfield Township; elected to 
ministry 1833, Codorus; deceased November 12, 1849. 

MYERS, JACOB E., born January 25, 1890, Springfield Town- 
ship ; elected to ministry October 2, 1918, Hanover; or- 
dained December 18, 1929; Hanover. 

MYERS, JACOB M., born October 28, 1846, Hopewell Town- 
ship; elected to ministry May 4, 1890, Codorus; ordained 
June 14, 1909; deceased May 22, 1921. 

MYERS, JOHN M., born August 26, 1887, Adams County; 
elected to ministry February 6, 1937, Marsh Creek; or- 
dained ; Fairfield. 

MYERS, S. B., born October 11, 1862, York County; elected to 
ministry May 26, 1896, Codorus; ordained January 1. 
1919 ; Dallastown. 

NEDROW, J. LLOYD, born September 25, 1885, Westmore- 
land County; elected to ministry October 7, 1911; or- 
dained ; Mechanicsburg. 

NEIKIRK, DANIEL H., born May 15, 1854, Hagerstown, Mary- 
land ; elected to ministry October 4, 1900, Back Creek; 
installed October 22, 1904; deceased October 1922. 

NEWCOMER, AARON, born August 4, 1866, Ringgold, Mary- 
land ; elected to ministry November 9, 1913; Antietam; 
installed November 1915; deceased November 13, 1935. 

NEWCOMER, PAUL K., born August 20, 1896, Codorus 
Township; elected to ministry May 1926, Pleasant Hill; 
installed May 1927; Spring Grove. 

NISWANDER, A. M., ordained, Back Creek; Greencastle R. 1. 

NICARY, S. OMAR, born January 29, 1916, Chambersburg; 
elected to ministry May 13, 1938, Falling Springs; in- 
stalled May 13, 1939; Chambersburg R. 1. 

OELLIG, C. RUSH, born October 23, 1862, Upton; elected to 
ministry January 20, 1893, Antietam; ordained May 15, 
1910; Waynesboro. 

OLLER, JACOB F., born January 18, 1825, Waynesboro; 
elected to ministry August 1855, Antietam; ordained 
about 1883; deceased January 30, 1897. 

PFOUTZ, C. L., born in Maryland ; elected to ministry Sep- 
tember 21, 1872, Marsh Creek; ordained 1886; deceased 
November 13, 1919. 



Biographical List 429 

PRICE, BENJAMIN E., born June 19, 1827, Waynesboro; 
elected to ministry February 22, 1881, Antietam; in- 
stalled January 18, 1883; deceased June 5, 1896. 

PRICE, JACOB, born April 16, 1811; elected to ministry No- 
vember 16, 1845, Antietam; ordained October 22, 1863; 
went with Old Order Brethren October 1880; deceased 
October 19, 1883. 

RARICK, RALPH G., born February 18, 1893, Royerton, In- 
diana; elected to ministry January 1, 1914, Bethany; or- 
dained September 5, 1921; Chambersburg. 

RESSER, GEO. M., born November 17, 1866, East Berlin; 
elected to ministry April 29, 1905, Upper Conewago; or- 
dained January 1, 1921; Manchester, Maryland. 

RICE, WILLIS M., born February 6, 1892, Masonville; elected 
to ministry May 18, 1929, Antietam; installed 1930; 
Zullinger. 

RIDDLESBERGER, ISAAC, born April 5, 1844, Waynesboro; 

elected to ministry September 16, 1882, Falling Springs; 

ordained May 14, 1910; deceased August 15, 1917. 
ROHRER, JOSEPH FUNK, born January 31, 1810, Hagers- 

town, Maryland; elected to ministry January 16, 1850, 

Antietam; ordained October 22, 1866; deceased October 

9, 1873. 

ROWLAND, JOHN E., born February 16, 1882, Greencastle; 
elected to ministry March 16, 1907, Welsh Run; ordained 
September 14, 1925; New Paris. 

ROYER, CHARLES, born April 7, 1811, Lancaster County; 
elected to ministry 1847, Buffalo; ordained September 23, 
1874; deceased February 28, 1895. 

ROYER, CHESTER H., born April 13, 1896, Talmage, Penn- 
sylvania; elected to ministry April 1922, Elizabethtown ; 
ordained April 1922; served in York; Manchester, 
Maryland. 

ROYER, JOHN, born March 17, 1768, Lancaster County; 
elected to ministry 1828, Buffalo; ordained about 1837; 
deceased October 28, 1846. 

RUTHRAUFF, JOHN B., born October 18, 1855, Waterloo, 
Pennsylvania; elected to ministry August 6, 1892, Antie- 
tam; ordained August 9, 1902; deceased March 25, 1910. 

SCHROYER, ADAM, born July 17, 1840, Loganton; elected 
to ministry June 22, 1878, Sugar Valley; installed June 
8, 1880; deceased January 11, 1833. 

SCHROYER, CHESTER F., born August 2, 1890, Loganton; 
elected to ministry June 24, 1917, Sugar Valley; de- 
ceased January 29, 1938. 

SCHROYER, DANIEL, born 1836, Loganton; elected to minis- 
try June 8, 1880, Sugar Valley; installed June 4, 1883; 
deceased March 4, 1912. 



430 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

SCHWENK, CHARLES A., born January 18, 1883, Loganton; 
elected to ministry June 16, 1907, Sugar Valley; ordained 
June 1913; deceased 1942. 

SELLERS, JAMES C, installed Pleasant Hill; Spring Grove, 
R. 3. 

SELLERS, N. S., born December 31, 1890, York County; 
elected to ministry 1917, Upper Codorus; ordained 1936; 
Lineboro, Maryland. 

SHAMBERGER, JACOB, born April 10, 1819, Middletown, 
Maryland; elected to ministry June 5, 1857, Codorus; or- 
dained May 16, 1869; deceased June 13, 1894. 

SHANK, JOHN, born January 11, 1811; elected to ministry 
and built Shanks Church, Back Creek ; deceased Novem- 
ber 17, 1877. 

SHEAFFER, WM. IRA, born March 25, 1875, Cumberland 
County; elected to ministry before 1909; ordained Janu- 
ary 5, 1918, Upper Cumberland; deceased August 25, 
1925. 

SHEFFER, SALMON S., born June 8, 1873; elected to minis- 
try 1918, Lower Conewago; ordained 1925; deceased 
February 22, 1939. 

SHIVELY, GREENE, born December 23, 1870, Union County; 
elected to ministry October 26, 1894, Buffalo; ordained 
June 1, 1905; Millmont. 

SMITH, WELTY G., born May 7, 1864, Quincy; elected to 
ministry October 16, 1909, Falling Springs; ordained 
May 6, 1915; Waynesboro R. 1. 

SNADER, EARLE,, born April 1, 1920, Waynesboro; elected 
to ministry December 31, 1939, Waynesboro; installed; 
graduated Juniata College 1942; entered Bethany Bibli- 
cal Seminary 1942. 

SNAVELY, HARPER M., born January 15, 1892, Heilman- 
dale; elected to ministry December 22, 1923, Spring 
Creek; ordained August 23, 1931; Carlisle. 

SNIDER, DONALD M., born December 18, 1915, Akron, 
Ohio; elected to ministry December 27, 1938, Waynes- 
boro; installed September 6, 1939; graduated from Beth- 
any Biblical Seminary, 1942; Huntingdon. 

SNIDER, JACOB, born June 12, 1826, Germany; elected to 
ministry August 23, 1874, Antietam; ordained October 9, 
1900 ; deceased December 1900. 

SOLLENBERGER, CLARENCE B., born October 28, 1897, 
Clarlisle; elected to ministry May 1920, Carlisle; or- 
dained April 1931; Carlisle. 

STAROOK, SAMUEL S., born May 16, 1859, Mattawana; 
elected to ministry September 28, 1906, Buffalo ; installed 
October 2, 1907; Mifflinburg. 



Biographical List 431 

STEERMAN, CHARLES H., born August 23, 1876, Belington, 
West Virginia; elected to ministry 1898, West Virginia; 
ordained 1907, Broadwater, Missouri; served various 
points in Southern Pennsylvania for 16 years; Leesburg, 
Florida. 

STOUFFER, DANIEL EMMERT, born August 10, 1884, Tur- 
key Foot; elected to ministry March 16, 1926, Falling 
Springs; ordained 1936; Chambersburg. 

STOUFFER, J. M., born May 7, 1878, Adams County; elected 
to ministry October 2, 1918, Hanover; ordained Decem- 
ber 18, 1929; Hanover. 

STOUFFER, SAMUEL M., born 1854, Franklin County; 
elected to ministry, Huntsdale; ordained May 16, 1900; 
deceased December 27, 1930. 

STOVER, DANIEL, born 1757, Franklin County; ordained 
about 1800, Antietam; deceased October 6, 1822. 

STOVER, WILLIAM (Stober, Wilhelm), born about 1725, 
Switzerland; ordained Antietam; deceased 1800. 

STOVER, H. M., born April 22, 1870, Greencastle ; elected to 
ministry November 1, 1898, Antietam; ordained July 
1913; Waynesboro. 

STRAWSER, GEORGE, born August 18, 1861, Juniata 
County; elected to ministry 1895, Lost Creek; ordained 
October 23, 1908; Richfield. 

SWEITZER, HENRY Z., born November 5, 1900, New Free- 
dom; elected to ministry January 1, 1940, Codorus; in- 
stalled January 1, 1941; Glen Rock. 

THOMAS, J. IRWIN, born January 1, 1898, Williamstown, 
Ohio; elected to ministry 1918, Eagle Creek, Ohio; or- 
dained November 19, 1932; Smithsburg, Maryland. 

TRIMMER, CHAUNCEY E., born January 28, 1885, York 
County; elected to ministry December 21, 1920, York 
First Church ; installed ; York. 

TRIMMER, J. E., ordained ; 264 West South Street, Carlisle. 

VALENTINE, M. C, born September 28, 1889, Emmittsburg, 
Maryland; elected to ministry May 27, 1923, Antietam; 
ordained May 28, 1932 ; Waynesboro R. 4. 

WAGAMAN, B. F., born September 11, 1911, Elbrook ; elected 
to ministry March 6, 1937, Falling Springs; ordained 
1939 ; Chambersburg R. 6. 

WALLECK, JOHN S., born January 23, , Greencastle; 

elected to ministry March 21, 1908, Back Creek ; ordained 

March 15, 1919; gathered much of data for Back Creek 

Congregation; deceased June 7, 1935. 
WERTZ, W. CLAY, born August 2, 1882, Johnstown; elected 

to ministry June 1904, Johnstown; installed December 

1910 ; Waynesboro. 



432 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 

WEST, W. A., born November 11, 1894, Franklin County; 
elected to ministry May 18, 1920, Antietam; installed 
1921 ; Rouzerville. 

WILDASIN, MARK A., born April 5, 1906, Brodbecks; elect- 
ed to ministry December 24, 1934, Upper Codorus; in- 
stalled November 14, 1935; Lineboro, Maryland. 

WILSON, JEREMIAH D., born February 11, 1865, Franklin 
County; elected to ministry May 31, 1904, Back Creek; 
ordained November 29, 1917; deceased July 6, 1939. 

WINEMAN, DAVID B., born February 14, 1845, Spring Run; 
elected to ministry in Ridge Congregation; ordained 
1918; deceased November 23, 1930. 

WINGERT, EDWARD B., born March 19, 1896, Franklin 
County; elected to ministry August 25, 1934, Back Creek ; 
installed November 6, 1937 ; St. Thomas. 

ZOBLER, W. N., ordained ; Gettysburg. 

ZIEGLER, EDWARD K., missionary to India ; ordained ; 
pastor First Church, York ; York. 



Biographical List 



433 



MISSIONARIES SUPPORTED BY SOUTHERN 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Missionaries Supported by Missionary Association of 

Waynesboro : 




Mary Quinter 





Minor Myers 



Mrs. Nora Arnold Lichty 



434 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Missionary Supported by York Sunday School: 




J. M. Blough 



Missionaries Supported by Sunday Schools of Southern 

Pennsylvania : 




Adam Eby 




Mrs. Christina Kulp 



CHAPTER XVI 



LIST OF CONGREGATIONS, NUMBER OF MEMBERS, 

PRESIDING ELDERS AND MINISTERS, 

YEARBOOK 1941-1942 



Congregation 
Antietm (311) 



Back Creek (304) 



Boiling Springs (40) 
Buffalo (168) 

Carlisle (190) 

Chamber sburg (275) 
Codorus (400) 



Falling Springs (236) 



Greencastle (187) 
Hanover (226) 

Huntsdale (145) 
Lost Creek (453) 



Lower Conewago (135) 



Presiding Elder 
M. C. Valentine 



M. B. Mentzer 



Henry L. Miller 
Greene Shively, Pastor 

H. M. Snavely, Pastor 

Maurice B. Mentzer 
S. C. Godfrey 



Welty G. Smith 



C. E. Grapes, Pastor 
J. E. Myers 

O. J. Hassinger, Pastor 
H. D. Emmert, Pastor 



G. W. Harlacher 



Ministers 

*H. M. Stover 
Walter A. West 
Willis M. Rice 

*A. M. Niswander 

* Edgar Landis 

* Norman Dentler 
Edward Wingert 
Frank McCoy 

*J. Albert Cook, Pastor 

*Marvyn Mensch 
Samuel S. Starook 

*J. E. Trimmer 
*C. B. Sollenberger 
Wm. Burkholder 

*Ralph G. Rarick, Pastor 
Adam E. Forney 

*S. B. Myers 

* George H. Keeney 
*D. Edward Keeney 
*M. M. Hartman 
*Obed Frey 

Samuel Lerew 
Samuel K. Sweitzer 
George Fuhrman 

*D. Emmert Stouffer 
*B. Franklin Wagaman 
*C. Lowell Gearhart 
S. Omar Nicary 



*J. M. Stouffer 

*B. F. Kline 

*E. E. Baugher 



*George Strawser 
*Ira Brandt 
Robert L. Ditmer 

*C. H. Altland 
*J. Albert Cook 

Charles Eichelberger 

Melvin Jacobs 



436 History — Church of the Brethren — Southern Pennsylvania 



Congregation 
Lower Cumberland (91) 



Marsh Creek (198) 



Presiding Elder 
J. E. Trimmer 



Mechanicsburg (80) 
Mt. Olivet (60) 

New Fairview (330) 
Newville (103) 
Perry (100) 
Pleasant Hill (314) 



Ridge (124) 

Shippensburg (217) 
Sugar Valley (57) 

Upper Codorus (300) 



Upper Conewago (338) 



W. G. Group 



W. G. Group 

S. C. Godfrey 

Michael Markey 
H. M. Snavely 
S. C. Godfrey 
G. Howard Danner 



Samuel A. Myers 



Samuel A. Myers 



N. S. Sellers 



J. Monroe Danner 



Van Dyke Mission (57) Mission Board 



Waynesboro (830) 



George L. Detweiler, Pastor 



Ministers 
*Henry L. Miller 
♦Walter E. Cocklin 
Harold E. Kettering 

*B. F. Lightner 
*Chas. G. Flohr 
*W. N.Zobler 
*J. G. Miller 
*W. A. Keeney 
♦W. C. Hanawalt 
* John Myers 

*J. Lloyd Nedrow, Pastor 
Ira Hart 

*Earl S. Kipp, Pastor 
♦William Miller 

Jacob L. Miller 

J. A. Buffenmyer 

Cletus S. Myers, Pastor 

*Henry R. Miller 
* Jacob H. Keeney 
*S. M. Lehigh 

James C. Sellers 

Paul K. Newcomer 

David M. Lehigh 

*R. L. Cocklin, Pastor 
B. Frank Johns 
Joseph Burkhart 

*J. Linwood Eisenberg, Pastor 

John C. Boone 
B. F. Long 

*A. S. Baugher 
*G. M. Resser 

Mark A. Wildasin 

Raymond Bucher 

Henry E. Miller 

Daniel Mummert 

*S. S. Miller 
*W. G. Group 
♦D. B. Harlacher .* 
♦George W. Hull 

Paul Miller 

Bruce Anderson 

Truman Grogan 

Arthur R. Hess 

Robert L. Ditmer, Pastor 

♦C. R. Oellig 
*H. C. Muck 

W. C. Wertz 

Donald Snider 

Earl Snader 



Welty (197) 



•T. I. Thomas, Pastor 



List of Congregations and Present Presiding Elder 



437 



Congregation 
York, First (788) 



Presiding Elder 
J. J. Bowser 



York, Madison Avenue M. A. Jacobs, Pastor 

(393) 

Total Members, 7,647; Elders and Ministers. 118. 



Ministers 

*Edward K. Zie^ler, Pastor 
*L. Elmer Leas 

* Chester H. Royer 

* Joseph M. Baugher 
*Ralph B. Lehman 

John W. Barwick 
Jesse O. Jenkins 
Ernest W. Lefever 
J. Jack Melhorn 
Stanley S. Dotterer 

Chauncey Trimmer 
Robert S. Kraut 



* Elder.